The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on April 11, 1951 · Page 9
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 9

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Wednesday, April 11, 1951
Page:
Page 9
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JFEENTCSOAY, APRIL It, 1951 BLrrmvn,LE, (ARK.)' COURIER NEWS PAGE KTKB Dramatic AA'Arthur Firing Announced As President Slept Kj ERNEST B. VACCAKO WASHINGTON, April 11. <AP> — President Truman's ouster of Gen. o pougtas MacArthur was disclosed, %-in typically matter-of-fact lashion, after the President had gone to bed. The White House scene—at 1 ajn.—gave his dramatic and politically explosive action Its visible touch of driima. The meetings with military leaders which preceded It—Including that last, night—were surrounded with utmost secrecy. Once his mind was made up. the language of the dismissal order and his exularrtory statement, agreed upon, the President called it a day It was bedtime for him. Word was circulated by the White House shortly before mid- nli>ril that an announcement would be forthcoming at, once from Presidential Secretary Joseph H. Short, j That, was all. Reporters, speculating for d°ys on what Mr. Truman m!"ht do about the outspoken general, went in droves to the White rcom. And they ran. race they did, shouting as Short had gone home by the time they finished their stories. In the Blair House diagonally across the street from the While Rouse, the lights were off in the aed rooms. News of Men In the Service House Ion? hefore the time of rendezvous. appointed They crowded in the doorway of a corridor leading to Short's office. tense and impatient, anil still spec- Short, as tense as any of them, cautioned that no one could leave For this Item, it's "News of Worn. en in the Service" — Miss Jean Baker of BlyUievllli has enlisted in the WAVES and i, reporting to New Orleans for as slgnment. She is believed to be Hi only Blythevillc girl to enlist In women's branch of the armed force since the start of the Korean war. A former employe o! Arkansas Missouri Power Co.. Miss Baker al so was choir organist for the I Street Methodist Church. She i and the daughter of Mr. and Luke Baker, 120 North Lockarc PROBLEM IN ARITHMETIC HOMEWORK—"Name 'cm? I can't even count 'em!" exclaims five-year-old Donald Sandier, Jr., of Crcve Coenr, Mo,, while the causes of his predicament blandly go about their business. They Eire H pups born to the Sandlcrs' German short-haired pointer "Aid- winkles Skyacre Mel)a." known around the house as "Wally/ 1 Besides trying to think up names, Don helps bo tilt?-feed the newcomers three times a day. an," April s—Secretary of the Army ace spent two hours \vlth Mac- rtlnir In Tokyo prior to Pace's In- spectlon of the Korean front. The general reportedly asked a freer hnnd in prosecuting the war, April 11—White House Tress Sec- retary Joseph H. Short announced (hat Mr. Truman had relieve* MacArthur of all his commands, effective at, once. Winter-Weary Cars Need 66 Service! Here's Chronology oi Events \Leading to M'Arthur's Firing '2, Oseeola. is currently stationed at Burtwood. England. A veteran of three "ears service in World War II. the room until after lie had ampli- pvt Edwards re-enlisted last year fied some of the points in a series i [or a f olir _ycar period. of mimeographed statements. He said these handout included pfc Larry D an i e l. son of Mr. and. " hitherto secret messages exchanged Mrs lirad n a m e i of Blytheville. has i Truman immediately between MacArthur and the Joint i lieen tra[]s f erlc d from Barksdale Arthur commander which led up to President Trtnnan's uese Reds across the Manchurlan border was "an enormous handicap, without, precedent in military opera- chiefs of staff which the President had reclassified last night. Air Force Base at Shreveport, La.. to Omaha, Nebr.. where he will at- 'Several instances nave occurred tend an Atr Force physical educa- recently which Indicate that it is | lion school. questionable whether General Mac- j Arthur is in full sympathy with the i Mrs. Hugh Parrish of Blythevillc government's policy," the secretary j has been notified that her hu: said, clearing his throat. He wentjSgt. Parrish. has arrived In Japan on to refer to a December directive I with the 730th Division. calling for official clearance by all! government personnel _ a special I Pvt j immie w . Goskins of Blythe- copy went lo MacArthur—ol all vi i] c |,as been assigned to the 82nd statements and speeches on foreign dismissal of General early today: July 13—The United Nations Security Council authorized the United States to establish a unified command of U.K. forces in Korea. Mr. named Viac- of all U.N. forces Aug. 28 — President Truman ordered MacArthur to withdraw a statement on Formosa which Mac MacArthur lions." Ilcc. .1—MacArthur called pletely false" reports that he had opposed U.S. assurance to the Red Chlne.se that their Manchurian bonier was completely safe. Feb. 8—The President said he had not seen a reported recommendation from MacArthur for the use of Chinese Nationalist troops In Doth Korea and China itself. Feb. 13 — MacArthur said that and military policy. The reporters scribbled furiously even as they braved themselves tor a break for the door and the race for waiting telephones in the press Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, N.C.. following coni[>lction of basic training with the Fifth Armored Division at Camp Chaffee. Ark. He Is the grandson of C. W. Glenn. 301 South Lake. Arthur had sent to the Veterans of military and not political factors Foreign Wars. The message got out 1 would keep his U.N. troops south of (he 38th parallel. Fch. 15—President Truman indicated to his news conference that n , , 1 any way. In It the general said Fnr- " S T._"_'|mosa was vital to America's Far East defenses and that it must remain In non-.Communlst hands. He] the entire strategy ol the Korean called it. an unsinkable aircraft car- war was in MscArthur's hands. Feb. 18—Gen. Omar N. Bradley. mate. Mjreh '.13—MacArthur said he was "ready at any time lo confer In tht*. fieJd with tile commnnder-in-chief of tile enemy forces in tile earnest effort' to settle the war. He also said he believed the Chinese Communists could be defeated by expanding the war to include allied air attacks and Chinese Nationalist amphibious landings on the Chinese mainland. March 24--A statement was '.s- stierl, following a meeting between the President and Secretary of State Acheson. which said Washington had nothing to tin with MacArthur's "ready lo confer" slatemcnt. April n — A letlcr MacArthur wrote Rep. Jne Martin (R-Massi on March 20 was made public. In It. the general applauded Martin's demand for the use of Nationalist forces to open a second front : the Communists in Asia. April G—A cable from MacArLhnr that demobilization of 120,000 Soul! Koreans "involves basic [wlltieal de rier. The President said the message confused the American position, Ocl. 12 — The President flew to Wake Island to confer with Mnc- Arthur. Dec. I- -MacArthur said his lack of authoritv to strike at the Chi- chairman ol the joint chiefs fvf j staff, told a reporter MacAiihnr "is' in full command In Korea." March 7 — MacArthur said continued "limitations upon our field of counlcroffensive action" means the Korean war will end In stale- cisions beyond my control" wai made public by the magazine "Free • How IOHR lias it been since your car was checked at all the |MMnls listed above? They need special attention, especially before hoi weather sets in. 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