Arizona Republic from Phoenix, Arizona on November 6, 1952 · Page 5
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Arizona Republic from Phoenix, Arizona · Page 5

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REPUBLIC MAIL REPUBLIC BULLDOG Page 12. .X The Arizona Republic, Phoenix, Arizona. .Thursday, November 6, 1952 Lam Gives m Attorney General e dslide1 IRepubhea rvii Late Returns Legislature Supervisor Latest Returns By States By The Associated Press - Indicated Ballot Measures Get Heavy Voter Approval Units Voting Units Popular Vote Elec. Vote .Stevenson Eisenhower Stv. Eis. Reprtg, State Ala. Ariz. Ark. Calif. Voters Also Triple GOP Members Of Legislature By BEN AVERY Arizonans returned Governor Pyle to the governor's chair for a second term with a thumping majority in Tuesday's Republican landslide, gave him a Republican attorney general, and tripled Republican membership of the state legislature. In addition, for the first time since 1920 they broke Democratic Party ranks in such a wave that other Democratic executive office holders and candidates pulled out with victory margins only in the last hours of vote counting. The final tabulation indicated they would win by nearly S j"!? proved an initiated law making picketing illegal except when a bona fide dispute over wages or working conditions exists between the management and a majority of employes of an establishment. Following is the latest tally on the ballot measures: PROHIBITING diversion of highway funds. (Constitutional Amendment) 100 Yes 104,752. 101 No 36,608 Retirement act repealer. (Referred by legislature) 300 Yes 91,152. 301 No 52,975. State department of finance. (Referred by legisture) 302 Yes 79,499. SOS No 60,540. State department of law. (Referred by legislature) S04 Yes 75,818. 305 No 59,808. State department of health and welfare. (Referred by legislature) 306 Yes 86,208. 307 No 53,738. Fair labor practices. (Initiated Act) 312 Yes 94,481. 313 No 51,189. Late returns yesterday from Tuesday's balloting added to the commanding totals by which Ari zona voters endorsed the five ref- erendums and one initiative on the ballot. They voted heaviest in favor of a constitutional amendment that will restrict the use of highway revenues solely for highway and street purposes and end recurrent efforts to divert this money. They also overwhelmingly approved the state legislature's proposition for repeal of the controversial state public employes' retirement act of 1948. By so doing they cleared the way for bringing the state's 5,000 public employes under the federal social security program. THEY GAVE heavy endorsement of the legislature's three state governmental reorganization propositions creation of the state departments of finance, law, and public health and welfare. Those actions cleared the way for the 1953 legislature to proceed with long-delayed plans to modernize and streamline the state's governmental structure. Over the intense opposition of labor groups, voters decisively ap L- ?f 2,505 2,229 .253,394 139,067 11 505 505 99,323 138,983 .. 4 2,382 1,726 167,758 133,146 8 20,746 15,532 1,458,504 1,891,693 .. 32 1,160 165,337 256,368 .. 6 169 481,482 610,989 8 240 62,228 65,770 .. 3 1,599 415,533 503,594 .. 10 1,309 348,392 160,614 12 827 93,559 177,841 .. 4 9,602 1,995,098 2,463,564 .. 27 4,155 794,040 1,115,644 .. 13 '2,367 423,720 761,147 .. 10 2,614 239,374 533,400 .. 8 3,601 443,516 434,326 10 1,676 286,508 261,092 10 617 118,545 232,275 .. 5 1,428 391.744 493.947 .. 9 1,967 1,085,821 1,293,800 .. 16 4,305 1.178,532 1,491,839 .. 20 2,800 444,882 583,631 . 11 1,448 147,265 100,468 8 .. 4,668 873,575 892,909 .. 13 726 66,960 93,750 .. 4 1,918 166,476 363,620 .. 6 315 22,602 43,706 .. 3 297 106,569 165,888 .. 4 3,840 1,009,195 1,365,243 .. 16 621 74,267 94,227 .. 4 10,348 3,070,622 3,934,069 .. 45 1,841 604,723 505,477 14 .. 1,439 54,203 129,852 .. 4 10,661 1,554,082 2,040,903 .. 25 3,792 423,003 504,458 .. s 8 1,491 141,660 238,007 .. 6 8,471 2,129,896 2,390.763 .. 32 284 200.209 206,351 .. 4 1,426 165,172 154,404 8 .. 1,819 84,165 187,757 .. 4 2,377 390,628 396,682 11 250 827,696 955,962 .. 24 940 133,759 191,972 .. 4 246 . 43,220 109,239 .. 3 1,783 270,158 347,247 .. 12 3,254 332,031 398,719 .. 9 2,662 429,560 394,704 8 .. 3,182 609,637 958,173 .. 12 598 37,307 64,455 .. 3 24,964,967 31,059,560 89 442 ? r& 1 N. J. t t N. Y. jjz S Ohio I V , 14? F Defense, Tax, Controls Big New Congress Items WASHINGTON (AP) The newly chosen congress faces half a dozen major issues, including a thorough review of the nation's machinery for a half-war mobilization. The next session, beginning Jan. 3, may be stormy and probably will be of fundamental importance. ROSS F. JONES tion; William T. Brooks, member of the Arizona Corporation Commission and Chief Justice Levi S. Udall of the Arizona Supreme Court. Also elected to the high court was Judge Dudley W. Windes of Maricopa County Superior Court. Unions Expect GOP To Hamper Repeal Of T-H Law Race Still In Doubt Latest returns last night from Tuesday's election appear to have dissolved all doubt as to the out come of races for Maricopa Coun ts major public offices except m Supervisoral District No. 1. The ballot battle between incum bent Supervisor James E. Lindsay and his Republican opponent, Wil liam S. Porter of Mesa, continued to be a photo finish affair. A night tabulation gave Lindsay a slim 143 vote lead. The vote Lindsay 15,645; Porter 15,502. IN DISTRICT 2, James G. Hart Sr., Phoenix contractor, held an apparently insurmountable lead over his Democratic opponent, E. C (Doc) Stults, for election as su pervisor. The tally showed 30,073 votes for Hart to 21,738 for Stults. In the third supervisoral district. James T. O Neil held a command ing lead over his Republican opponent, Ralph Babel. The vote: O'Neil, 19,081; Babel 14,175. In the county's judicial contests, incumbent Superior Judge Charles C. Bernstein virtually was assured re-election with 68,074 ballots tucked away to his credit. Nicholas Udall, former Phoenix mayor, apparently had cinched the 'second seat on the superior bench with 58,026 votes. HENRY S. STEVENS, local at torney, was trailing with 43,404. Later figures continued to build up the once slim lead of William P. Mahoney Jr., Democrat, over James E. Hunter, Republican, in the county attorney s battle. The, night tally gave Mahoney 59,222 to 54,499 for Hunter. Also adding to his lead was incumbent Phil A. Isley, seeking reelection as county treasurer. He had 59,168 votes to 55,621 for his opponent, Walter A. Kimball, Republican. John II. Barry, county school su perintendent, had a comfortable 61,079 to 53,799 lead over Maxine Provost Brubaker, Republican. ROGER G. LA VEEN, county recorder, also continued to build up his edge over Republican Henry A. Barnes. The vote: Laveen 60,- 898; Barnes 54,628. C. L. Sparks, incumbent assessor, led Republican Dave Wick 61,771 to 53,048. Voters gave Sheriff Cal Boies, who had no Republican opposition, 69,225 complimentary ballots. Card Boosters Slate Dinner GLENDALE (Special) More than 100 members of Glendale High School's three football teams have been invited to attend a dinner at the school cafeteria next Tuesday. This outing will be sponsored by the Glendale Cardinal Boosters. The Boosters also have scheduled a regular club meeting for next Monday at which Glendale principal Robert Ashe and the GUHS board of trustees will be present. Purpose of the dinner is to acquaint members of the varsity, jayvees, and freshman teams with booster club members. ED HALLMARK, permanent chairman of the organization, pointed out that the club's fact finding committee has discovered three points which it believes are hurting athletics at the school. These are (1) the school has no official director at athletics. Bob Crouch, sometimes called athletic director, teaches six PE classes, and hasn't time to devote to a regular director's job, it was revealed. (2) Glendale High has far less full time PE coaches than many Class A schools: and (3) The fact-finding committee discovered promising young coaches have left the school to take other jobs where they can devote less time teaching and more time in physical education instruction. WHISKY AGED BY WAVES NEW YORK (UP) One of these days you may be drinking whisky that has matured for only a few minutes, instead of the usual period of years. Ultra-sonic waves will make It possible, says the N.Y. Journal of Commerce. Secretary of State State Auditor Gains GOP Strength Maricopa County will send two Republican senators to the 21st Arizona Legislature and possibly one or more Republicans to the house of representatives, late election tabulations indicated last night. The senate has been completely Democratic for nearly three decades. There are only 15 Republicans in the house of the current 20th Legislature from the whole state. Of these, seven are from this county. THE TALLY showed Elijah Allen (R) in the lead over Frank J. Popello (D) 2,223 to 1,361 for election as representative from District 2. In District 11, Al Lindsey, Incumbent representative and a Democrat, was trailing Republican Ruth Adams in one of the major upsets of the election legislative picture. The vote was 1,557 to 2,-787. W. W. Franklin, incumbent Democratic representative from District 13, was holding a slim 56-vote lead over his Republican opponent Ether H. Angell as counting progressed. And in District 12, Lewis R. Burch, incumbent Democratic house member, apparently had been beaten by Ruth C. Kuntz, Republican, by a vote of 1,270 to 1.335. IN DISTRICT 14, Mrs. Frank (Clara C.) Haberl (R) held a comfortable lead of 1.058 to 1,611 over Spencer D. Stewart . (D). Robert H. Wallace, Incumbent Republican representative from District 17, was out in front of his Democratic opponent. Ken Clarke, 2,184 to 1,728, as the climax of a lively campaign in that district. Wallace has been one of the leaders in the predominantly Democratic house. In District 18, Harold W. Tshudy, Republican, upset the dope sheet to apparently defeat Charles H. Abels 1,594 to 2,060. Abels is a former member of the house who was trying for a comeback. Richard G. Kleindienst (R) had an impressive lead of 1,740 to 650 votes over L. D. Hemman (D) for the job of representing District 25 in the house. IT APPEARED certain that L. S. (Dick) Adams, incumbent Democratic representative from District 22, had won re-election over his Republican opponent Joseph K. Wood, 1,142 to 873. Adams is a legislative minority leader and one of the! most controversial figures in the house. Derek Van Dyke, an incumbent Republican house member who wields some influence in that body, ; seemed a certainty to return to. the 21st Legislature from District 26. He was leading G. N. Baker, Democrat, 2,229 to 1,001. Similarly, it appeared that Robert L. Myers, incumbent Republican house member and likewise influential, had wen re-election over Democrat Hanna G. Shaw 2,941 to 1,189. Myers represents District 27. WALTER HmSCH (R) was out in front of Daniel W. Bumstead (D) 1,847 to 1.584, for election from District 32. Jack D. H. Hays appeared to have easily trounced Virginia Smoot (D) in District 34. The vote was 2,578 to 1.31L Another major upset was In District 35 where incumbent Democrat Cal Estes appeared to have gone down in defeat before Isabel Burgess (R) by a vote of 2,592 to 1,867. Sam Joy (R) was well in the lead of Robert E. Miller, in District 36. The vote was 2,125 to 1,255. AND ROBERT Brewer, Republican, held a small lead over S. Earl Pugh in District 37. The vote: 2,320 to 2,138. Probably the biggest political surprise of the election in the county races, was the conclusive victory wen by the two Republican candidates for state senator O. D. Miller and William R. Pyper. They defeated incumbent Democratic Sens. John E. Hunt and Roy D. Stone. The vote: Miller 62,864, Pyper 58,857, Stone 53,143, Hunt 53,009. , DIGGING WORMS PAYS WEST SULLIVAN, Me. (UP) A lucrative industry hereabout is ter-ribellidae-digging. Those who dig the$e worms sometimes make as much as $16 a day. The worms are shipped to New York and sold to salt water fishermen in that area. Tax Commissioner Long Term Short Term Colo. Conn. Dela. Fla. Ga. Ida. 111. Ind. Iowa Kans. Ky. La. Me. Md. Mass. Mich. Minn. Miss. Mo. Mont. Neb. Nev. N. H. Tenn. Tex. Utah Vt. Va. Wash. V. Va. Wis. Wyo. TOTALS making peace and freedom se- cure." The AFL leaders wished Eisen hower success and said they were confident "you will do your utmost to carry out your pledge to be fair and just to Americans in all walks of life." Green and Meany also wired Stevenson, the unsuccessful Demo cratic nominee, saying "we are proud that we supported you the fight for the principles you espoused and which we supported will go on." Jack Kroll, director of the CIO's Political Action Committee, said in a statement that Eisenhower had been "selected as the presi dent of all the American people he is entitled to their support in carrying out the duties and obli gations of that high office." UNION political strategists claimed that most union members voted Democratic on Tuesday as their leaders had urged. But this appeared at least debatable on the basis of the Eisenhower sweep. The vote count in many industrial centers suggested that millions of union members disregarded their leaders again, just as ap parently happened in 1950 when the unions' all-out fight to defeat Sen. Robert A. Taft in his bid for a new senate term in Ohio failed completely. The CIO-PAC disclosed that it had a private poll taken at seven ClO-organized factories In the week of Oct. 6-13. The sampling Congress District No. 2 Judge of Supreme Court 1,650 169 278 1.684 1.828 865 9,680 4,202 2,481 2,851 4.135 2,118 625 1,428 1,967 4,480 3,793 1,790 4,771 1,137 3.067 ' 353 297 3.840 894 10,348 2,036 2,299 10,877 3,859 2,269 8,472 284 1,563 1,950 2,495 254 969 246 1,795 4,381 2.841 3,225 677 146,361 131,498 20,000 votes. The Democratic nominees won without trouble, however, in the races for judicial offices, and the state tax commission, which are placed on the ballot without party designation. THE OUTCOME left no doubt about the personal popularity of Governor Pyle and Dwight D. Eisenhower, Republican presidential candidate. This, plus determination or fank and file voters that it was time for a change nationally, inspired the great outpouring of votes a new record for the state. The governor, in unofficial returns compiled by The Arizona Republic-Associated Press Central Election Bureau late Wednesday, was leading the Republican surge in Arizona by nearly 50,000 votes over his Democratic opponent, Joe C. Haldiman. Pyle 142,029. Haldiman 94,221. HALDIMAN conceded the election at 11 p.m. Tuesday, and went to his Insurance firm office yesterday morning with a statement that he already had forgotten his defeat. "I hope the Republicans can fulfill their promises to the people," he commented. Though happy at the outcome, the governor restrained any show of jubiliation, declaring that the responsibility that the tremendous vote carried with it was too great. Apparently the voters singled out Fred O. Wilson, Democratic attorney general, for defeat as a result of the criminal charges and counter-charges that marked his primary election battle with Robert O. Morrison, Pima County attorney. WTLSOVS OPPONENT, Ross F. Jones, Phoenix attorney, held an ever-widening lead that came almost entirely from the voters of Maricopa and Pima counties from the time the first ballots were counted. The final tabulation gave: Jones 121.730. Wilson 102,847. Jones will be Arizona's second Republican attorney general since statehood. That office was won in the 1920 Harding landslide by W. H. Galbraith. FOR HOURS, in fact until returns began pouring in from out-state yesterday morning, it looked as if the Eisenhower-Pyle landslide would sweep Democrats out of the executive state offices in the fashion of 1920. In that year only the state treasurer, the tax commission, and judicial offices remained Democratic. In Tuesday's voting, however, two Democratic executive officers remained in the lead throughout the vote counting. They were Wesley Bolin, secretary of state, and Mrs. Jewel W. Jordan, state auditor. All of the other Democrats were incumbents seeking re - election, except J. W. Kelly, candidate for state treasurer; William E. Stanford, candidate for a short term on the tax commission, and Ed TVTnssev. candidate for state mine inspector. IRONICALLY, the only Repub-Viran executive office incumbent besides Governor Pyle was defeated. He was George Hillier, who was serving out the remainder of the term of Joe Hunt, who resigned, as an appointee of the governor. Hiller opposed Thad M. Moore, veteran tax commissioner, for a 6-year term, while Ed Ilolderness opposed Stanford, a commission employe, for the short term. Other Democrats winning reelection were M. L. Brooks, state superintendent of public inStrUC- GIRLS TO VISIT JAILS MACON, Ga. (UP) A group of 125 high school girls here has undertaken a project which will take them inside every jail in the county. Girls of Macon's Miller High School Tri-Hi-Y Club are buying magazines, books and newspapers with thier pocket money and distributing them personally to prisoner in the county's jails. President By NORMAN WALKER WASHINGTON (AP) The Re publican landslide victory in Tues day's election was regarded by some observers as a probable sign of an abrupt waning of organized labor's influence in government. , Labor has held high place in the councils during the 20-year Democratic regime. There is every expectation that some of them will still be invited in, but none of them really expects to speak now with anything like the authority they had before the votes were counfed. Union bosses conceded privately that their hopes for repealing the Taft-Hartley Labor Law and achieving other union aims had been practically buried under the GOP's avalanche of votes. Virtually all the labor organi zation leaders had backed the Democrats but both the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations came cut yesterday with pledges of sup port for the Republican presidentelect. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower. Both big groups had been all-out supporters of Gov. Adlai Steven son. WILLIAM GREEN, AFL president, and George Meany, secre tary-treasurer, sent a congratula tory messaee to Eisenhower sav ing: "The AFL accepts the verdict of the American people'. We call upon our 8 million members to give you every possible support In re sisting Communist aggression and In addition to major interna tional and military problems, the legislators must decide whether to continue the present high tax rates and what to do about wag and price controls. They probably will consider changes in the controversial Taft-Hartley Act. The senate may argue about altering its rules to allow civil rights legislation. Congressional investigations are likely to be stepped up, with heavy emphasis on uncovering waste in military expenditures and exploring Communist activity. A new probe of tax-free institutions is expected to begin next year. THE ENTIRE house and a third of the senate will come back with fresh support from the polls. Holdovers will consider re-election an endorsement of their previous policies. Newcomers will push their own ideas. The last congress, by its control over appropriations, exerc ised strong influence over foreign policy. It told military officials that requests for fresh billions would be scanned more sharply in the future. The 83rd congress will show whether this stand was taken largely for election year purposes or in earnest. .These are the main issues: Military expenditures the administration last March requested $51 million which was cut to $46,-600,000,000 for one year's rearmament. Pentagon officials are talking now of asking between $41 and $46 billion for next year. Congress is expected to contend, as in the past that the buildup can be accomplished more economically. Two house and two senate committees are due to continue exploring alleged waste and to insist on administrative changes. FOREIGN ASSISTANCE congress reduced President Truman's foreign aid program for this year from $7,900,000,000 to $6,031,000,-000. Officials say the new budget will approximate ' the 1952 requests. Taxes All major tax increases voted in 1951 to help finance defense will expire by law in 1953 and -1954. These include the boost of 11 per cent and more in personal income taxes, now effective until Dec. 31, 1953. The 83rd congress must take action if these increased rates are to remain in effect. Price controls wage, price and rent controls are on the books until April 30, 1953, and the rest of the Defense Production Act, including the allocation of strategic materials, until June 30. - State Treasurer Supt. Pub. Instruction Santa Cruz County Gives Demos Siveep NOG ALES (AP) Santa Cruz County voters gave Democratic candidates a sweeping majority in all county offices. Not a single Republican was elected. Final returns, although unoffi cial, from the six precmcts showed: Sheriff J. J. Lowe re-elected over J. C. Moore. 2,396 to 626. R. T. Frazier won another term as supervisor of District 1, 918 to 392, defeating Clayton V. Smale. Gilbert C. Soto re-elected super visor in District 2 over J. A. Mc- Gimsey, 641 to 408. Blain Lewis finished ahead of K. William Holbrook for super visor of District 3. The vote was 427 to 270. Mary Bettwy won re-election as county recorder, by a 1,872-1,201 vote over Ada Jones. Re-elected without opposition were State Sen. Hubert O. Merry- weather (D); Rep. Neilson Brown (D) 2,241; County Attorney Ruffo Espinosa (D) 2,252; County Treasurer George Lowe (D) 2,349; School Superintendent Cora Everhart, 2,329; and County Assessor Pierre S. Baffert (D) 2,337. Electronics' Finger In Pie PHILADELPHIA (NANA) Planes, projectiles and peach pie now have one thing in common electronic? The iame instruments used to test jet engines and rockets have been successfully applied to the more peaceful pursuits of assuring consistent home-made flavors in mass-produced pies. According to engineers from Minneapolis-Honeywell's industrial division .each pie flavor has its own specific temperature and cooking time. They point out that the temperature setting dials on some commercial ovens do not carry degrees, but Sre graduated in terms of fapple," "peach," or "cherry." The electronic devices automatically control temperatures and cooking times for pie flavors. This control function, they explain, is basically the same job the instruments perform when applied to research work in atomic applications or Jet-engine test work. State Mine Inspector Corporation Commission Landslide was said to show 70 per cent for Stevenson and 30 per cent for Eisenhower. The CIO-PAC said this may have been indicative of how union members voted. IT APPEARED a sure bet that the Taft-Hartley Law would stay on the law books. Eisenhower has promised to make needed changes, including revision or some nrovi- sions which the president-elect said could be used for "union busting." But Senator Taft, the law's prin cipal author, who will be a power iui iigure in tne new congress. nKeiy win can tne tune on any labor law changes. Taft himself has backed some revisions. Eisenhower never mentioned the T-H law's injunction provisions. one of the features the union leaders hate most. The chances are these injunction provisions will stay in the law even though other features may be changed. Where President Truman has often avoided invoking the injunction provisions to stop big strikes as in the two-month steel industry walkout this past summer union men consider Eisenhower likely to be less prone to ignore this method of handling major walkouts. Philanthropist Dies In Chicago CHICAGO (INS) Max Adler, 86-year-old Beverly Hills, Calif., resident, renowned for his philanthropic activities, died in his Chicago home Tuesday night. Adler and his wife, Sophie, the sister of the late Julius Rosenwald, were best known for their gift of the world-famous Adler Planetarium to Chicago. Besides his widow, Adler leaves two sons, Cyrus and Robert; two daughters, Mrs. Leonard Sperry and Mrs. Bernard Mayers, both of Los Angeles; 12 grandchildren and one great-grandchild. f RED UTOPIA FANTASTIC PITTSBURGH (AP) The Communist Utopia never has existed and cannot exist, says Fr. John R. Schlict of Duquesne University. The idea that the inequalities between men .can be wiped out is false, he tells his students, because "it not only accepts authority in economic life but also uses this authority ... in telling a man what he wants to do or is best fitted to do." Attorney General Governor I Vote May Top 60 Million WASHINGTON (AP) The total popular vote In this year's presidential election may reach 60 million, by far the largest figure ever. Also General Eisenhower easily won the championship on individual vote getting, outdoing the previous record set by Franklin D. Roosevelt 16 years ago. When returns had been counted from 131,498 of the nation's 146.-361 voting units, Eisenhower had 31,024,749 votes and Adlai Stevenson had 24,943,441 for a combined total of 55.937,290. If the remaining precincts cast votes at the same rate as those which have reported, the grand total would soar to 63,295,000. However, the last precincts to come in are traditionally the isolated, smaller ones. On thether hand, there are votes yet to be counted among the absentee returns. The largest popular vote for president in any previous year was the 49,820,312 total piled up in 1940 whert Roosevelt defeated Wendell L. Willkie. The ereatest vote cast for any one candidate heretofore was 27,751,597 for Roosevelt in his 1936 triumph over Alf M. Landon. Incidentally, losing Democratic Stevenson got more votes Tuesday than any Republican ever did. The highest for a Republican candidate was 22,395,198, for Willkie in 1940. Latest Tabulation Of County Returns In Major Arizona Election Contests Representative in District I No. 1 U. S. Senator ' S S S - e s o 5 s 5 S I S Z B $ 8 o S ? e g - B S S o e c e I 2 g t 3 S S 1 I I 1 J 3 III 1 S l 11 1 1 I I J J 3 J s 2 jg g - ti fri. b ? m SS 6 fi W 5 P sS P3 63 g.5 (S B O Z - to m Apache i il54j 1550 1325 1331 ; 1400 1084 1572 1157 704 1192 1563 1511 1044 1403 1242 1404 1018 1311 1050 1481 1098 1465 1029 1454 1073 1037 667 1225 527 Cochise . 4S51 ! 5645"( 5517 ( 3S83 I 5843 4095 5467 4404 2452 4508 5103 6233 2642 4821 4007 - 6594 2714 6117 2695 . 5877 1 2801 6222 f 2489 j 6090 3368 4762 1890 4560 1957 Coconino ; Jogs" 3i82l 2241 2767- 2515 2194 2996 2298 1464 1815 3337 2817 j 1872 ,2466 2344 2888 1940 2665 j 1987 f 2694 2054 2696 1916 2692-1 1925 2434 1233 2235 1249 TjTf j 3245j 2780 '3225 f 2716 1 3184.1-' 2619 3596 3207 2166 3128 3008 3887 2297 3504 2770 3946 2126 3502 L. 2208 3644 2905 ( 3741 2482 3819 23971 3642 ( 1698 3563 t 1776 ijraham 1 3200 2lin 2475 I 1722 2529 1364 2612 1882 1004 2114 , 1376 3388 1 764 3196 1573 ) 3048 1124 2761 1141 2716 1232 2626 1183 2672 1206 1837 1038 1869 940 Greenlee 1 3019 I 13771 3128 1114 - 3200 875 2331 1773 ( 952 2976 2308 j 2844 1091 2474 975 3395 789 3339 878 3389 1 772 ( 3343 766 3344 758 2151 1 570 1960 658 Maricopa 1 4S506 73982 515S2 66961 54210 1 64094 1 69071 61921 36406 j 46329 3167 3075 1761 t 2674 64377 63749 53115 j 57361 56987. 56115 54683 55369 54664 55601 j 59195 j 52675 35674 57288 30206 Mohave 1 2104 30971 2482 2636 1 2540 2180 3312 2468 2202 2055 75251 64069 52887 51626 2246 3157 1814 2934 1908 2972 -1911 2897 ) 1831 t 2993 1849 2653 1301 2552 1330 Xavajo j 25l 1314 . 1139 928 ( . 1132 t 795 1141 982 586 985 1139 1250 - 671 .1154 772 1293 708 1196 j , 696 j 1239 692 1211 688 1213 665 1091 472 999 1 512 p- 1 19323 1 284S0 21793 25555 I 23203 ( 23018- 25040 13452 19307 17398 30235 1- 22892 21698 16289 29178 22952 J 23861 13117 23861 23117 21652 21977 21991 j 21518 1 22682 19540 11178 j 16350 14326 "Pii j 3952I 4199 4137 3117 4674 2640 ( 4424 3753 ) 1875 ( 3541 4207 4986 2294 t 4089 3146 5199 2371 4719 2559 4636 2668 4653 2582 4606 2714 t 3610 1822 2557 1645 Santa Crux 1365 17161 155Tij 1370 . 1776 1076 1649 1135 1044 j 1308 1812 1826 - 947 1 1398 t 1484 1866 938 f . 1823 - 968 1823 951 1805 - 958 1783 977 1359 681 1349 t 717 Yayapai ( 3162 ! 5670 1 4159 4755 1 - 4256 j ' 4175 5695 4871 ) 3174 ( 3067 5378 5048 3315 4046 4361 5330 3276 f 4677 j 3603 4774 t 3625 4728 j 3514 1 4621 3691 .4345 t 2825 4572 , 2344 Yum 1 1 363I 3SQ5 4466 2850 4460 j 2511 ) 4444 3632 2124 j. 3265 ) 4145 4820 2022 3707 3251 1 4600 2292 j 4642 f 2163 4562 2284 j 4435 2241 4320 2322 3921 1 1725 3735 1 1632 - TOTALS 99325 138988 112220 121705 54810 64094 6071S t 8826 I ls85a t 1P6835 75455 84281 14209 128644 f 9530S t 102847 121730 180160 81177 119396 10618 119039 117168 j 9&S34 116786 t 104832 105063 62774 105814 j 59818

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