The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on June 19, 1939 · Page 6
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June 19, 1939

The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 6

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, June 19, 1939
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Page 6
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PAGE Peiil Of Beigs In June Causes Lineis To Change Route WASHINGTON (UP)—The annual seasonal irmement of iceberg ' caused trans-Atlantic shipping routes In early June to be mo^ec' fiO miles south, Coast- Guard sources revealed here. Within a week, however, the lanes were moved back to tliclr original positions skit ling ,0ie tail of-the Grand Banks. Soon, after the Dessau, a ficr man \cssel, reported 13 Icebergs approximately 200 miles south ot the tall of the bnnks, the following cryptic message v»as ladloed by the hjdrographic sen Ice of tlie navy: "Information received from Norlli Atlantic Track Agicement that effective Immediately Track A eastbound shift to cross lonj,Hu<le 47 in,-latitude 38-45. Track: A westbound slilft south to cros, longlt ide 47 in latitude 40 until June 4, then shift 'outh to cross longitude 47 in latitude 39 30' Daily Bulletins Sent Neither the liydrographu, sen Ice nor: : the : Coast Guard alters the lanes, the Coabt Guild, notified 1» ships in the Iceberg aiea of an> Ice floes, lelajs Hie information to the Iljdiographic Service, which in turn ad\lses shipping bj menus of a daily bulletin When bergs (ire located repicsentatues of steamship companies confer In New York through an organization Jno\\n as the Track Agreement Steamship heartquarteis in north ern Euiopean ports are notified of the daiigei and the proposed rerouting, and the) in turn advise Tnrnadn Plavs Ne» York of their acqulerancc lornaQO rla yS /lutomntieallj the new lotilmgs go ihto./'effeel/.follcnving lines that have already been set and are used legularly during such emer- Eencics. l The original lanes were followed again on June 6 nftcr the Coast BLYTHEVILLE, '(ARK,)-; COURIER NEWS Stars In Jewelry Drama r.Tmr'" ~vau**'&:.~'*& r '"^\ '. >i >, ! 4fi Vhilc perspiring deckhands loaded, unloaded and reloaded the baggage fAlnrlone Dietrich and the officials of the liner Normandle bit their nails .impatiently; Ln Dietrich struggled to" disentagle herself from 24,000 woith of Income lax trouble', which Uncle Snm -suddenly diop- jed on hei ns she was about to sail foi nance Abo\e, Mailui" ligns 100,000 woith of jewcliy om to the government so she could get way. Internal Revenue Agent J. B. McN'omara waits calmly behind her. Guaid ice-patrol reported Ik fall- me to locate tlie Ice-masses le- poiled by the German ship. This incident brought to light the annual service of the International Ice Patrol, a group of three Coast Guard .: cutters whose ex- coast Guam : cutters whose ex- K * .'«I»"B. some umoers were penses are shared by 13 countries. ?" rrietl ns high «=> 300 feet lii'o RM-ro 4 V»arv nu "'5 air" Entering tlie town, Miss Brant saw ..'druggists...passing out (Inlaid kits without chnige, men and Bergs 1 Years Old Icebergs found menacing Gulf Stream shipping during the spiing f and early aummei are 4-year-old ; monsters which broke off of a 1 Newfoundland glacier soon after their second birthday, drifted through Baffin Bay, huddled alone the coast of the. Davis Straits through the summer nnd winter, nnd weie then canied into the shipping zone by tlie Labrador current. . Trip bergs range in size fiom •what Is known as field ice to the Slant once seen by the ice patrol, which was 1,700 feet long by 00 feet high and containing approximately 38,000,000 tons of glacial Ice. They are a menace iinlll they gel Into the Giijf SUcarn pro|>cr where the 72 degree water quickly melts them. The large berg described was a little .'unusual, officials said, inasmuch as, the* average berg towers to a height ol some .250 to 450 feet. The name, ice patiol, would seem to Indicate lhat the purpose of the group Is to locate ice. Another piincipal function Is lo act as a general clearing house for Information concerning Icebergs. Patrol Lasts 15 Days Two vessels are dispatched to the ice region each spiing, arid, .bating at Halifax, put to sea cvi'ry two weeks for a 15-day tour of duty and then a 15-day lay-over in port for replenishing fuel and supplies. A third vessel, the General Green, based at St. Johns, is equipped with oceanograplilc equipment for permanent ice observation work. ,' . Efficiency of the palrol is increased by assigning a special ice- patrol officer every four years; he •spends his flrit year understudying his predecessor and tiie three subsequent years alternating be- ,,t«een full-time service during the ice season and instruction at Harvard- and Massachusetts Institute of Technology during the winter. The officer changes patrol cutters at .sea. The duty of the ice observation officer is to keep a minute check on Ice movements, cold .--- --•- • --••w«. 1 o t i,Liivt CUlitifl-5 salinity of the water, temperature tc Icebergs are often hard to lo- In Minnesota Town; 11 Killed; 200 Hurt (Continued from Page One! night at us, and he started driv- IIB fast. , Then we siw 11 would nitss us, and we slopped. "I saw the funnel strike Ih'e edge of town 'nricl then sweep fin through. It moved with . terrific speed. - I could .see timbers being Uncivil into the air, nnd buildings falling. Some timbers were women seeking fianllcally for missing relatives the injuied oe- Ing laken to the hospital by do/.- 1 The streets were full of broken glass, trees blown down, wires hanging In tangles," she said. ''It was an. awful sight. I'll never forget it ' Dell Student Given Danforth Fellowship John Mndhon Stevens of Dell a student'in tlie University of Arkansas college of nnilcnllurt nl KayeUeville, has received n Danforth summer fellowship In lend : ership training, it 1ms been announced by Dean Dim T. Gray of the University. Yoimg Stevens, the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Stevens, had been named an alternate to Lafayette Riitledge, who was unable to take the fellowship. > Recipients of the Danforlh fellowship' ; are selected by faculty committees on a basis of physical, mental, social and religions development and are chosen only from students in stule colleges of •igrlculturc, it is said. . After leaving Fort Lcavemvorlh, <ans., where he is in an R. o. T. C. training camp at present, he will leave on Ihe 30 ilay free trip .0 which the winning of Ihe fc'l- owship entitles him. He will spent! two weeks in si. Louis before going lo Ihe American Youths' Foundation cnmp in Michigan. Canary Comes Home; Absent Nearly Year MARION, III. <UP)—The old adage, "leave 'em alone and they'll came home," holds good even in the case of missing canaries, according to Mrs. Charles Lance. Her canary escaped in June 1938, when a cat, springing against "-- cage, knocked open the small British General Visits Finland Visit of Gen. Sir Waller Kirkc, above, inspector general of British home forces, to Finland, is viewed ns. highly important in light of the general's known friendship for Finland ant] Finland's apprehension thai western powers may support Soviet demands in the Baltic. <• trouble at all In coaxing It bad: Into its cage. AKRON, O. (UP)—Sirens shrick- ud, brakes groaned, as Fire engines responded to an alarm from an apartment here. The fire: A steak burning on ti slovc. ,' door. The bird disappeared. After an absence of 11 months, the can- cate, it was said, because dense foe J" 7 reUmlcd "'"1 Perched on the common to the area make* vW. nce m Iront of tnc Lfln cc home. common to the area makes bility difficult. I In addition to the General Green, the cutters Champlaln and .. Clielan are on duty this season. Expense of their upkeep is divided , proportionately among Belgium Canada, Denmark, Prance, Germany, Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Russia and the United States. Mrs. Lance said she The Morning AfterTaking Carter's little Liver Pills Attend Funeral Sunday Of Mrs. George W. Reed f A' number of Blylheville men .were In Heber Springs yesterday , afternoon for the funeral of Mrs George W. Reed, mother of Nelll R«ed. • . '.' ; Among these who made the trip W?:,,P3n, Edwards, Bryant s'tew- art, J6hn Nolen, G. B.' Carter, Ross Stevens, B. A. Bice, Harvey Mori Is. They, were .accompanied by James CosUrtiiof Osceola. (PLUS I WANTED TO BOY SURPLUS COTTON SEED & SOYBEANS Full Market Prices Briny to Our Blytlieville or Gosnell Gin . 0. HUGHES GIN CO Before the Lewises came there were Howard Games and Aubrey Smith to inspire the boys and ilrls of tilts little school which was itnrted in a single room taught by >ne teacher. And all the time there have been men and women n this community who through the school board nmf the farm niieau have been interested in forwarding this educational, enterprise. It's not an easy thing for Hie eighth grade graduates to go on o high school but the school dis- lict encourages their doing so by mylng a fiat rate tuition at both lie ivfanlla and Dell school and by arranging transportation. When the school opens In July, there will be one of the most up to late of school buses to carry pupils o high school. The bus meefe the 3ell bus at Rtseland In order hat Uic'jc who wish to go to the Dell schcol niny make connections and their it carries the other group on to Manila. The modern bus, CO, I ••••B Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Lewis And Daughter Entire Staff ' One of tho most progressive communities In (he county boasts one of the most progressive eighth grade schools In the county and as far as the teachers In that schcol are concerned, if s strictly a family affair. : For Mr. and Mrs. W. A Lewis and daughter, Miss Willie Unvls are the only teachers In the l.osi Onne school which has an eju-il- ment of 240 with nn average attendance of HO. 'Hie Lewis family for the past few years has guided the education of the l/jst Cane students with remarkable success. Of this year's graduating class of nine students eight .will go on to high school at (.Ither Manila or Dell. The average of pupils who sceli higher education is unusually high In nils'fann- ing community. last year there were 23 Lost Jane students in hfsjh school, and five of the 13 students, wlb gradu- MONDAY, JUNE 19, 1939 Lost Caiic TeachingJStaff I.o.vt Cant's family le.icliliif; .stall': (left (o rtgtit)-M£ss Willie Lewis, W. A. Lewis and Mrs. W. A. Lewis. _ '. —Courier News pljoto a ten cent.admission fee have seen ilctures ranging Ir'om Hie life of Bdison through the Him version of the novel "Little Men." Other plans for the year include the buying of more playground Arkansas State college nt -Jones- bought two weeks ago, lelivered July 10. be The new bus Is only one of several improvements planned for the icxt school term. A sound movie projector will bo nirohnsed by the school board for he purpose cl Introducing- educn- lonal niins Into the classroom district In .which there are two more while schools'and one negro school. The Installation of electric fans will] make the Lost Cane building the first rural, school in the conn-, ty to be equipped with fans. The appropriation Includes the adding of a stage and two dressing rooms to the three reom building. Another building project of..Die group was completed in '37 when the tcacherage was erected. Tills year.will mark the completion of another project. When concrete walks are laid on the school ground, It will mean another step forward in the campus beau- tiftcation project. About $300 has been spent In filling in the campus to eliminate a muddy playground. Among the extra curricula!' activities of Lost Cane students are two trips to Memphis eacli year. This past year the Lewis trio accompanied them to Memphis during the cation carnival season and also at the end of school. Each year, they arc cxc\ised from the classrooms to attend county club and farm bureau rallies here. Transportation for these trips is arranged by the scl^ol board and fnrm bureau members. Perhaps the secrets behind the progressivencss of this group are Hie facts that a large number- ol winiTof i , "'""'""MM ""-' 'acts mat a large number- ol idea of moving pictures has the 100 families in the commn exi " commu- — .,,„ , ... o i**ui,im^ iiiia >een experimented with In the com- inmity since January when the school board made arrangements vlth Mr. and Mrs. T. I. Ivy to show movies . with their projector each Wednesday. night. Members of, the 'community'far nity own their own land and that they all work, together. They cooperate in working far their school just as they worked for their electric lights and their gravel road executive secretary. So when the Lewises return from (heir vacation In. Izard county this Slimmer to continue their work, they will find many new improvements accomplished and others contemplated. The biggest change how- over will be that Miss Lewis won't be there—she plans to teacli at Milligau Ridge this year—but nevertheless, the new teacher, whoever it may be, will probably fall in with Mr. and Mrs. Lewis and the Community's scheme of things. Cooperation is the keynote of the community ahd It's difficult to imagine anyone's going to Lost Cane without becoming imbued with that quality. Farmers' Increased Use Of Electricity Revealed Use of electricity on the farm as a work-saver increases as the income of the farmer increases, ac- ccrding to D. S. Lantrip, county agent of North Mississippi county. When tlie farm income is low, use of electricity is low and when farm income is high more farmers use electricity. In 1D32 figures compiled by the Electric Institute show that there were 2,5BV Arkansas farm.? served by electricity. This figure increased to 7.5CD In 1937. Tlie number of domestic consumers in the state, both farm and residential advanced from 88.S13 on' December 31, 1932 to 108,386 at the same lime in 1037. Sale ot household mcdel electric refrigerators als^. reflected an increase when iarm income'was increasing. In 1932 as reported by the Edison Electric institute 2,992 electric refrigerators were purchased while in 103C, 11,907 were purchased and in 1937, 12,789 were purchased. Consumption of electricity on tlie farm shows 'big increases as farm Income rose. In 1938, 1,936,000 kllo- ' watt hours of electricity were used on farms while in 193G farmers used '4,260,000 kilowatts and in 1937 they vised 5,523,000 kilowatts. Total electric consumption for the'state Increased from 265.415,000 kilowatts in 1933 to 372,900,000 kilowatts in 1930 and to 438,013,0000 kilowatts in 1931. were released. Judge Doyle Hehder- scn ruled that because the prisoner escaped from an out of slate prison that the defendants could not be held on those charges. * Jim Andrews was fined $15. on™ a charge ot disturbing the peace. WlH Simpson was fined ten dollars on a charge of disturbing the peace. W. O. Campbell was fined $25 on a charge ol reckless driving bul ten dollars of the fine was suspended. The case of Frank Ilaywood, charged with assault ("id battery, was continued. , t i In the case of Agnes Bailey, charged with selling liquor without a license, the defendant failed to appear and forfeiture on the bond was declared and the clerk directed to cite bondsmen. The same thing happened in the case of C. E. Gaylord who illso forfeited his bond on a similar charge, both of which are old cases, officers said. Kenneth Clark was fined ten dcllars after entering a plea of guilty (6 a charge of violation of the fish and game laws. TOLEDO. O. (UP)—Three banks* i liquidation here have had n netT •• COURTS The 13 men arrested uy county officers over the weekend for minor charges will be given hearings in municipal court tomorrow. Saturday's court session was taken up with several public drunkenness, reckless driving and disturbing the peace cases. The case of W. S. "Pete" Barnes, charged, with leaving the scene of an accident, driving while under the influence of liquor, and operating a car without a license, was continued. The accident was a miner trine one, it is said. Ira Freels and Mrs. Agnes Kennel, who were charged with accessory after the fact of burglary and grand, larceny in connection with the alleged harboring of an escaped In gain of Income over expenses of $4,337,515 since they were taken over by the state in 1931. THIS BOOK EXPLAINS ALL ABOUT PIUS A new edition of an Illustrated book has just been published by the Thornton & Minor Clinic— the world's oldest institution specializing in the treatment of piles and other recial afflictions. This book explains why rectal disorders fre- suently cause such common ailments as headaches, nervousness, stomach and liver troubles. It points out the danger of neglecting even a minor case of piles . . . shows how malignant and incurable conditions may result. 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