The Anniston Star from Anniston, Alabama on January 28, 1974 · Page 3
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The Anniston Star from Anniston, Alabama · Page 3

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Anniston, Alabama
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Monday, January 28, 1974
Page:
Page 3
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Ah'' i ; u is' r.' Injured girl critical Randolph begins storm cleanup From Staff, Wire Reports A six-year-old Randolph County girl remained in critical condition in the intensive care unit of University Hospital in Birmingham this morning after suffering injuries in a vicious tornado that killed her nine-month-old brother Saturday. Hospital officials said Cindy Sue Baldwin was critical although they would not elaborate on her injuries. They said the girl's father, Edwin Baldwin, 42, was in satisfactory condition. Meanwhile in Randolph County, a sheriff's office spokesman said volunteers from rescue squads in Randolph, Clay and Cleburne Counties and a group from LaGrange, Ga., were busy today continuing the cleanup operation. The spokesman said volunteers remained on the scene five miles east of U.S. 431 between Wedowee and Roanoke throughout the night to guard against looting but this morning "most everything valuable had been collected." The twister touched down Saturday afternoon near the Baldwin home and destroyed the structure. Bartlett Baldwin was killed and his father and sister were injured. Mrs. Getting there Of the Nation's 47.2 million Americans age 16 or older who work in metropolitan areas, most get to their jobs by car 36.2 million. But, according to Census Bureau figures, of the remaining workers, 3.8 million travel by streetcar or bus, 1.7 million by subway or railroad, 3 million walk, 1 million work at home, and 1.5 million use taxis, bicycles, and. motorbikes. m "D" ls For DESK ... And At Joe lie We've Got The Best! ConltrncDfk-76"r 8' ' ovtrhing on 3 f iM drivwr in top of Loft PedeitiU w JOEZIC & CO., INC. Office Equipment & Supplies Cor. 12th. and Noble Anniston Dial 236-6396 i. Bryan Hanson home completely destroyed ... roof Baldwin was at a laundromat when the tornado struck and she was not injured. The sheriffs office spokesman said at least five families were left homeless and the tornado took several trailer homes in its path. The spokesman said the twister touched down, "then just picked up and moved about five miles before it hit again in the Bethel community where it did some damage." Civil Defense and Red Cross workers from around the state were on hand Sunday to aid in the cleanup operation. The sheriff's office spokesman said the weather Sunday was sunny and warm. He added, "if you couldn't see the mess that thing left, you'd never know it was here. It just came with no warning whatsoever." Several other persons were injured in Randolph County and were taken to the Wedowee Hospital where most were treated and released with minor cuts and bruises, the spokesman said. In Covington and Coffee Counties in South Alabama, three persons were reported injured when a tornado struck there. Another 18 persons were injured when a tornado hit a trailer park near Columbus, Miss., and in Lafayette, La., a woman was hospitalized after a twister touched down and demolished her mobile home. Early this morning a storm accompanied by high winds was reported in Fayette in western Alabama where authorities said two homes were destroyed and power lines fell. No immediate injuries were reported there. Mild temperatures and some sunshine emerged over much of the Southeast Sunday, according to the National Weather Service. Cloudy to partly cloudy skies and mild temperatures are expected for today over much of north Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee and Mississippi. A weather service spokesman said a week cold front is expected in Louisiana late today. Call Joe Zic For Instant Delivery" ft i. ',.7 of his home lies in field in background 11: r-i if V ; r" V L j Mr r, if Hwk Part of mobile home around pole . . . evidence of tornado s force Simmons heads planning unit Calhoun County Commission Chairman Roscoe Simmons will have jurisdiction over two manpower planners in Calhoun County through a ! change in manpower revenue sharing funds grants. Simmons said today Calhoun County will receive federal revenue sharing funds through a six-month grant under the new Comprehensive Employment and Training Act. This is the first time a local elected official will serve as the prime sponsor for. the manpower grants, Simmons said. Prior to this, state governors, have been sponsors for the fundsr e The .new act will eliminate most of the categorical programs now operating and substitute special revenue sharing grants to states and cities and counties over 100,000 population to offer comprehensive manpower services tailored to local needs. Simmons said thetwo. manpower planners will work out of the Alabama Employment Service office. The size of the grant is not yet, known, Simmons said. -, The grants should make possible- such .se.rviceS. as recruitment, counseling, testing, placement and follow-up; classroom instruction in' remedial education; on the job training; work experience and transitional public service employment; child care and medical services. . Simmons said he was notified by the U.S. Department of v Labor Friday to contact the regional manpower staff immediately if Calhoun County intends to apply for funding as a prime sponsor of the program. He said today he contacted the regional office in Atlanta to indicate the county's desire to participate. Nixon seeks more funds for vets WASHINGTON (AP) - President Nixon today proposed cost-of-living increases in veteranspensions and an eight per cent boost in GI benefits as part of a $13.6 billion legislative package for veterans. Nixon also urged that Congress restore Nov. 11 as Veterans Day, repealing part of a 1968 law which switched the holiday to the fourth Monday in October. The proposals were contained in a special message to Congress, one of ajeries Nixon is sending to CapitoT Hill' Before his State of the Union address Wednesday, night. : The President said his administration is preparing legislation to grant the 2.4 million persons receiving veterans pensions the same type of automatic cost-of-living increases available to Social Security recipients. .wrL i fyji Vietnam vets 'People forget9 MI As NEW YORK (AP) - Dennis P. Sullivan, an alumnus of Rice High School, '65, and Vietnam's Central Highlands, '67, put his beer on the table and leaned forward. "I mean if somebody's an MIA, and the North Vietnamese know, why not say so and put the py's family out of their grief. It's got to be better than going to bed every night hoping you're going to hear something." It's a Sunday not quite like the others at Capt. Edward L. Grant American Legion Post No. 1225. National MIA Awareness Day, one year after the cease-fire. The war is over and done with, like a lousy summer job, with some missing men among the reminders. Denny Sullivan, a 25-year-old policeman, and four of his buddies are shooting the breeze in the tiny barroom of the post, located in a tired old neighbor- City on list for sewer funding Anniston's Water Works and Sewer Board is midway on a priority list for federal funds now available for construction of waste treatment facilities. According to Gary Owen, general manager at the water department, Anniston has been assigned number 58 on a priority list of municipalities for waste treatment grant assistance for fiscal year 1975. Montgomery is first on the list with number 98, Owen said. Approximately $17,788,000 in federal funds is now available, the. Alabama Water Improvement Commission (AWIC) has announced. The money distributed will be based on the seriousness of pollution problems of the various cities and the urgency of need for correctional facilities. AWIC plans a public hearing on municipal grant priorities at 9 a.m: Monday, Feb. 4 in Montgomery. Commission attorney R. Craig Kneisel will serve as hearing officer. The hearing will be in Room 200 of the State Office Building. MOST OF the funds available will be used for "municipal applications already certified and the new list of priorities will be for 1975 funds, AWIC said. Owen said the Anniston water department might use any money received for doubling the present Choccolocco Creek treatment plant and review of . all - sewer lines to determine infiltration and repair needs. Municipalities applying for grant money may receive 75 per cent of the eligible cost of the projects, AWIC said. In addition to Montgomery other municipalities--witl-topried-signs--sayihg Laird "is no priority include Samson, humanitarian." Childersburg-Bon Air, Ashville, - The award, presented at a Cullman, Mobile, Troy, Dothan, fund-raising dinner for the Opelika, Sylacauga, Town mentally retarded, is named in Creek, Auburn, AndalusiaJ tonor of the late Rep. John E. Monroeville and Jasper. Fogarty of Rhode Island. For 20 Others on the priority list years he was chairman of the include Talladega, Gadsden and House appropriations sub-East Alabama Water, Sewer committee for health, and Fire Protection Authority, education and welfare. Elliot Hanner inspects pile of rubble . . . once was his talk of lost hood of the Bronx called High-bridge. There's Jack Conway and his younger brother Jim, Dickie Morrison, and Glenn Amlung. All are under 30, graduates of the same Catholic grammar school, products of the neighborhood, veterans of the Army. While a basketball game blares from the television and old Tom Flynn keeps his counsel at the end of the bar, they talk about the Vietnam war and America's 1,100-plus men still missing in action. "Everyone remembers, but it's no big deal anymore," says Sullivan. "Like at a family gathering, someone will say, 'Hey, what do you think about the POW-MIA situation.' And someone else will say, 'Yeah, it's a bitch. Pass the roast beef.'" Jack Conway served 11 months in Vietnam. Now a salesman for a beer company, he doubts a full-scale effort is under way to account for the MIAs to whom President Nixon has dedicated the day. "It was a big thing in the beginning and now they're just phasing it out," he says. "There's no pressure from the public. When the war was on, there was the film on TV every night, the body counts. Now it's over and people forget." Jim Conway, an electrician who joined the Army three years after his brother, feels the MIAs are no longer an issue Jhat politicians will bring up. Not enough drawing power, he says. "Everyone used to be on the bandwagon. Now the band Laird, Ford get mixed reception PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) -Demonstrators hurled eggs and tomatoes at presidential adviser Melvin R. Laird when he arrived with Vice President Gerald R. Ford to receive an award. Neither Laird nor Ford was hit by the approximately 15 eggs, tomatoes and other objects that were thrown by about a dozen of the estimated 150 demonstrators chanting anti-Laird slogans Sunday on the Providence College campus. Laird and Ford expressed no reaction to the incident and made no mention of it later in speeches. Moments after the throwing incident, another group of about 100 warmly applauded the two just outside the college's Alumni Hall. Both groups were made up mostly of Providence students, campus spokesmen said. Laird, former secretary of defense, came here to receive the John E. Fogarty Foundation's humanitarian award. Some of the demonstrators car- 3 2U AmiWmt 0fttT comrades wagon is in the barn and they're off on something else," he says. "The politicans won't pull rank because everytime they bring it up, the liberals start their warmonger routine,". Sullivan says. '"Don't get involved, don't mention it. Just shut your eyes and the bogeyman will go away.' That's the way they feel." All five say they have been driving with their headlights on to show support for the MIAs, and Jack Conway thinks the idea of a special day is good. "You've got to remember the families on Memorial Day and Veterans Day and so forth,' it's a way of showing them respect. You don't want to say it wasn't worth it." Sullivan: "I don't feel sorry for the guys so much what the hell, they're gone but for their families. Because I know how my family would feel every year if I'd given my life." The talk turns to the war. They say it could have been won if America-Turned on the power. But you do what you have to do. They remember experiences. The time one unit found a patch of what they thought was marijuana and wound up trying to smoke something tasting like crabgrass. The movie interrupted by howitzer fire. The media heavy who got stuck in the rice paddy. "I'd go again," says Amlung, a bartender, and everyone agrees. "About 40 guys hang around here, and if you ever need any help, you ask someone," says Jim. Conway, gesturing around the barroom ana its plaque-cov Praising Laird, Ford told the dinner crowd, "We will miss him because of what he contributed to the country." Laird is leaving his Nixon administration post to join the Readers' Digest. Count on your pharmacist . . . because he's always ready to help you. Remember that helping is his business. Consult, him . . . seek his advice. That's why he's there. WIKLE DRUG CO. 1010 Noble St. Downtown Monday, January 28, 1974 carport and a barn ered walls. "We're made that way. If we were asked to go back again, we would. I don't think anyone would back out." "Let's face it, nobody says it was the greatest two years of his life," adds Morrison, a court officer. "But it's something you've got to do, so you do it." And the cease-fire? Will the date Jan. 27 mean something in the future? "I'll tell you something," says Sullivan, leaning forward once more. "This time last year I went downtown to St. Patrick's Cathedral and attended Mass) I wenfto Mass again this morning and I'll go again next year. And I'm not a church-going man." OLDS CUTLASS Poy only for th got you mm. CALL 238-1165 Wt htnor Amtncin Eipriti, Dlntrf. Cirtt ilnch, tonkAmtrtcirtf and Milr Chrjt plui tur own crodll card. WE FEATURE GENERAL MOTORS CARS! tent a Car i i located At C Street And Quintard Ave. - A IICMMt II IiNm! RiM-Aff CW. lliiifp0 Efficient Service, Friendly Interest mm

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