The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on May 13, 1942 · Page 2
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 2

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Wednesday, May 13, 1942
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Page 2
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BLYTHEVILLE, (ARK.) COURIER NEWS WEDNESDAY, MAY 13/1942 EDSON IN WASHINGTON By KTEB fcBSON News Correspondent • f \Some oUti^, lovgUesMiglits in tWashingtdri Soh't 'get in the pa- fpers. Ma|be it'a just as well, for r the hardest limits >$re apt to be -the longest **|hts "ind, *he- longest £ fights hafe a "tendency 'to 1 develop chess^ mattes, .where a 'move to be made only-' once every Jialf bout; or a British cricket linatch, where the spectators stand Jfsround in; gray toppers, leaning on ""their canes for days at a time without any more signs of life than ?^»rS?o?i!9 occasionally opening his moutn.to say "Haw"!" Among i the bitter and bitterer I' battles tl|at have been ; fought in 'Washington this :past Winter have teen sonie of "; t)»e 'closed session hearings Before' panels of the War Labcr Board. Clarence 33. Randall ,«cf Chicago, Inland .Steel vice president who^ presented, his company's case before 'the WL23 -recently, told -about a "few of .the fast rounds maintenance issue, or decide that his issue should be frozen for he duration of the war. The unions might go on outlaw ,trike if the decision went against ,hem, in spite Collects Autographs On Her Handkerchiefs agreement. The union members of the War Labor Board might withdraw from the board, as they did in the coal case, and thereby wreck it. In all these alternatives you have the War "Labor Board's great weakness?**'. It can be wrecked. There is no act of Congress, no specific law giving it clear-cut'gun's ambition i.s to obtain the sig- jurisdiction or standing before the (natures of President Roosevelt and courts. poiieht. Murray's rich Scotch burr, his sense of the dramatic and his timing make him an extremely forceful speaker. In, one session he talked 'for more than three hours without stopping, beginning at .noon and so making everyone miss lunch. ; In another session, Murray, in objecting to a ruling of Chairman Meyer's, said bitterly, '1 do hot think you are fit to preside over this panel!" It threw the session into an uproar', though a week, later, Meyer and Murra> were laughing about it when Murray had occasion to remark with mock meekness and sugary humility, "May I enter my usua mild objections?" Murray and Randall had one o their hottest rounds when Murraj at one stage '-in the proceeding demanded the right to audit th Inland books. Randall countered with a demand to audit the unioi books ancl charges that there were plenty of things in the union rec- : they may represent all that ord which would not stand the I good, but regardless oi" latitudes MCLEAN3BORO , 111. 'UP)— Mrs. of the no-strike j George . w H oyan, McLeansboro, boasts an autograph collection of more than 2,GU(J names—all of them on individual handkerchiefs. Most of the signatures are in pencil and the handkles are dipped in a' vinegar solution to perserve the writing. Thr.n they are placed n cellophane envelopes to prevent hem from getting dirty. Mrs. Ho- •HIGHLIGHTS FROM LATEST BOOKS Jie King and Queen of England. She has been colh'cUny for eight years. Life and Times Of A Big Business Giant corporations may be the curse of modern life to you, or . fought 'intthis case; and they make [, an interesting chap'ter on one phase of "/the-war effort that isn't generally vknown. " ' : 5 Much to-do was made over the announcement that WLB was to make-its yfull board meetings open to the public, but this does not apply to the panel meetings, where the- real ^arguments' are presented before ..tbiee :inembers, one representing the public, one .labor, one .management. In the Inland Steel case, --Arthur S. Meyer, 'chairman of the New York : state mediation board, presided as 'panel -chair. man,, and at its opening session '• en Feb. 26, ft was agreed that no one would talk until after the hearings Twere concluded. At first .that was considered a gag rule, [• but^as'tfie "hearings progressed it became apparent that this gag was probably for the best interests, for •if: the two. sides had been permitted to spout openly there would have been; daily gran'dstanding and attempts * to grab headlines that would have made this controversial dispute over closed shop or light of publicity. Thiy called Die round a draw. Those are just samples of what goes on in session after session as these labor disputes are argued out. The Inland Steel negotiations have been going on eight months. There were 17 sessions of direct company-SWOC negotiations from September- through December, disposing of all questions but closed shop and check-off. In mid-January. SWOC asked for $1 a day increases: In February the cose was certified to War Labor Board. Panel hearings WE re concluded toward the end of April. The panel—Meyer, Cyrus Ching and Richard Franken- steen—has since then been reviewing the record. They will call back the union and management representatives for questioning. Thej will make their findings. Then wil come sessions before the full Wai Labor Board—public sessions ii which there will be oratory and legal arguing to tire the patience of the gods themselves. It will be June or July by then, and the end will not yet be in sight. he story of bhj business belongs NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION Letters of administration on the estate of Elijah Monroe Terry, deceased, ware granted to the undersigned on, the 8th day of April, 1942, by the Probate Court of Mississippi County. Any persons having claims against said astute are required to exhibit (.hem, properly imthenticated, for allowance, to the undersigned as administrator of said estate, before end of one year from the date is much in 'the story of America j of the granting of letters of ad- is do Valley Forge, the Louisiana Purchase or the dust bowl. Du Pont growth from a small union maintenance exceedingly dirty. > RESPECTS MURRAY , Randall'; himself is never at a loss for -a word, and he pays full respects to Phil Murray, president of the Steel Workers Organizing Corhmittee who presented the case fpr the union, as his op- For all Kinds G. G; CaniMU Af ency Glencolnotel 3*3*. „ >PH. 2182 The record of the Labor Board in the Walker-Turner, International Harvester and Kearn'y shipyards decisions might lead anyone to -believe that Inland and the other "Little Steel" companies— Republic, Youngs town and Bethlehem—are in for a licking on 'this union maintenance or closed shop issue. Four things might happen then: The companies can comply gracefully. The companies can comply" and yell. The companies can refuse to accept the decision, which would lead naturally to a takeover by the government. The companies might decide to take 1 the issue to court, on the principle ' of equity that the courts have the power to review the 'findings of the War Labor Board. No such ] Expert Tractor Tire r! manufacturer of explosives to a corporation producing more than 10,000 separate items, forms the basis for William S. Button's book, "Du Pont — One Hundred am! Forty Years" (Scribner. $3), the story of a firm which changed our material way of life. From its earliest days until the post-World War I period, tin; Du. Pont family made munitions and explosives. World War 1 revealed Du Pont had the know-how fur production of munitions, ancl on their shoulders was placed a large share of the burden of arming the 'allies. World War I also revealed the dependence of American industry upon Germany for many of its essential chemicals, chiefly for dyes. When Du Pont undertook to fill the nation's needs for domestically producing dyes, a far-reaching change in the corporation had its | beginnings. In 1913,'Du Pont employed G222 men and women, had $75,000,001) in assets, and. derived 97 per cent of its income from explosives. At the end of 1939, Du Pont employed 54.800, owned assets in excess of $850,000;000, and more than 90 pel- cent of its income came from sources other than explosives. "Most important," the author comments, is the creation of "new industries and new employment, and providing the United States with a newly found security in the forui of a dependable domestic supply of many essential materials, formerly obtained abroad. Lacking this supply, following the momentous events of December, 1941, America would have been ministration upon said estate, and if such claims be not .so presented, they will be forever barred. JAMES TERRY, Administrator of the estate of E. M. Terry, deceased. Frank C. Douglas, Atty. A8-15-22-29-MG-13 The Courier News has been authorized to announce the following candidacies, subject to the Democratic primary In August. For State Senate L. H. AUTRY For Representative W. F. "CRIP" WELLS W, J. "BILL" WUNDERLICH JAMES G. COSTON J. LEE BEARDEN (for re-election) County Treasurer JACK FINLEY ROBINSON (for re-election) County Judge ROLAND GREEN (for re-election) County Clerk T. W. POTTER (for re-election) Tax Assessor W. W. "BUDDY" WATSON (for re-election) Sheriff and Collector HALE JACKSON (for re-election) Circuit Clerk HARVEY MORRIS (for re-election) fight is admitted in the Presi r 'deht's ' executive order . se.tting up. the War Labor r /Board under the war emergency powers ~*~ rf acts. If the courts should accept jurisdiction, a legal battle longer than the fighttn' war itself might ensue. TKIKE POSSIBLE There are two further outcomes if you care to consider the long- shot : V>ossibility that the War Labor Board would decide against the uniciiB on the closed shop or union Don't wafth until the last to have yopr Tires Repaired—Coin* in NOW > - Materials lUmited! Rlytheville Tire Co, Highway <ji Nona — Phone 2201 hopelessly lost." Kcmeiribers Wistaria in VV5H PASADENA. Col. (UP)—The late Mrs. Carrie Ida Lawless, owner of a giant wistaria vine which has become a veritable shrine for flower lovers, made provision 'in her will for its continued maintenance "as long as it Is practical." The wistaria vine was brought from China 49 years ago. Kill Bed Bugs <To Relieve distress from MONTHLY) FEMALE WEAKNESS Try Lydla E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound to help relieve monthly pain with its weak, nervous feelings —due to monthly functional disturbances. It helps build up resistance against such distress of "difficult days." Follow label directions. DEFE Chas S. Lemons PRESENTS PERFECT SOLUTION FOR GIFTS Make defense against heat and friction your first thought when you buy motor oil. Buy Sinclair Opaline. Opaline contains no "5th Columnist" wax and petroleum jelly—non-lubricating substances that thin out in heat and cut down on "oil's lubricating ability. Wax and petroleum jelly are removed from Opaline by an extra refining process. Play safe. Use Sinclair Opaline Motor Oil. It lasts so long it saves you money. •>•. * • Matching Cases Midget Overnight $ 6.50 Ladies' Overnight 7.50 Men's Overnight 7.50 Ladies' Packalot ~ 11.00 Family Wardrobe ,19.00 Portable Wardrobe....-20.00 B. I. ALLEN I Chas. S. Lemons — Agant — Blytheville, Ark. !/ $29.95 $49.50 LOOKS LIKE-REGULAR DAVENPORT CUILT \V!Til-':•;£ FAMOUS KROEKLEit NON-SAG CONSTRUCTION •^ ***;:?*•«* r 1 * **»s £Kr*wWK£| .-.^ •* / MhK. v^k ' ItV •/<&i*Ja*t1St4t* CARVED FRAME 'SOFA-BED . Some of live Davenports shown arc not Kroehle Built, hut have the same dependable construction. • »*'?£*;? °^S?y nr %L^ MAKE HER THE HAPPIEST GRADUATE OF 1942! WITH A HOPE CHEST As Advertised In Esqnire. Today an ancient tradition is glorified by America** most popular flift for %\i\ graduates— the LANE Be sure the Hope Chest that will hold your wedding trousseau is a Genuine LANE, with exclusive and patented features that giv* GUARANTEED MOTH PROTECTION. Priced $22.95 to $49.50 As shown $39.50 CONVENIENT TERMS Spray infested rooms — walls — beds — mattresses — bedding with Bee Brand Insect Spray. Kills moths, roaches, ants, flies, mosquitoes, too. "irs A KILLER 4 Women's Wordrtb* Hangtr Cat* or M*n'i 7-SuIt Hana«r Cat* "Home Furnishings Moderately Priced"

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