The Courier-Journal from Louisville, Kentucky on November 7, 2000 · Page 8
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The Courier-Journal from Louisville, Kentucky · Page 8

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Louisville, Kentucky
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Tuesday, November 7, 2000
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Louisville B4 THE COURIER-JOURNAL TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2000 EDITOR: Jean Porter porter - courier-journal.com PHONE: 582-4691 FAX: 582-4200 Neighbors dislike plan for 'breakout' house Man, 19, dies after falling from trestle 1 I Non-traditional materials called sub-par by group ft! REHL ROAD "-4!wV0-! I.. - ;, ..r. y . By MARTHA ELSON The Courier-Journal Ruth and Kevin Wyatt stress that the contemporary house they're building from non-traditional materials in the Lakeside area is designed by a nationally known architect. Samuel Mockbee, who runs the Rural Studio in Greensboro, Ala., and who designed the Wyatts' house as a pro bono project, was featured in the Oct. 2 issue of Time magazine for the "cheap, practical and unconventionally beautiful" housing he's built for Alabama's poor. And the latest Dwell Magazine features their house along with others in modest-sized cities as examples of dynamic "breakout" houses that could stir up excitement. It's certainly done that on Ravinia Avenue, in an area designed in 1920 by the Olmsted Bros, firm but not quite in the way Dwell Magazine had in mind. If the Wyatts proceed with plans to use galvanized metal and a layered plastic siding on their new home, other residents say they'll file suit to uphold deed restrictions for Lakeside. The Belknap Neighborhood Association will discuss the issue at its meeting tomorrow at 7 p.m. at Kinko's, 2226 Bards-town Road. The deed restrictions, from 1923, say that residences will be built from brick, brick veneer, stucco or stone. Residents began circulating a petition in the neighborhood over the weekend asking that the deed restrictions be upheld, and their attorney, Mike Maple, said he is prepared to file suit although he's still discussing possible compromises. John Carroll, the Wyatts' attorney, said he did not want to discuss the merits of the case but was still talking with Maple. The Wyatts, who now live in the Highlands-Douglass neighborhood with their two children, said last week they have already changed the color of rippled concrete tiling for one side of the house from grey to terra cotta. And Ruth Wyatt, By SHANNON TANGONAN The Courier-Journal A 19-year-old Mount Washington man died early yesterday after falling about 150 feet from the train trestle over South Pope Lick Road in southeastern Jefferson County, police said. Nicholas Ledman "Nick" Jewell, 19, of 115 Blackstone Trace, died of multiple injuries, Deputy Coroner Linda Knopp said. The fall occurred about 12:30 a.m., she said. Jewell was with four friends when he attempted to cross the tracks, said Officer Robert Bi-ven, a Jefferson County police spokesman. Jewell was about halfway across the span which stretches 772 feet when a freight train approached, Biven said. The conductor of the train, operated by Norfolk Southern Railway, said he saw Jewell move to the side, attempt to hold onto a railroad tie, then fall, Biven said. The train did not hit him, officials said. The vibration from the train is so intense that it causes the ground below to shake, Knopp . said. "If the ground is shaking, you can imagine what it's like up there," Knopp said. No other injuries were reported, and police do not think drugs or alcohol were involved. The trestle has attracted thrill-seekers over the years, despite an 8-foot-high fence meant to keep them away. There have been at least three deaths since the late 1980s. Many teen-agers consider crossing the trestle at night an initiation into adulthood. They are also drawn by the legend of the Pope Lick Monster, purportedly a half-man, half-sheep creature said to live near the trestle. Knopp, who interviewed PHOTOS BY MICHAEL HAYMAN, THE COURIER-JOURNAL Kevin and their son Urban, showed a sample of the glass substitute they plan to use. 4' ' -Mr l J Mi, and appalled at the prospect of living the rest of our lives across from a house covered in transparent plastic and corrugated galvanized metal." Allison said he plans to ask the city law department about deed restrictions this week. Although the Wyatts were granted a building permit after they reduced the length of a roof overhang, some residents say the house also looks too big for the lot. The Wyatts say the square footage is no bigger than other homes that have basements which theirs does not. They also say the street already has an eclectic mix of styles. The Wyatts further say the deed restrictions are outdated (noting that they also exclude African Americans from the neighborhood). They also say that newer materials have been used on other houses. But Maple said those are minor violations, such as use of aluminum trim, and are not of the character or scale of the Wyatts'. "The house is massive," said neighbor Robin Conner. "It should not be on this little court with smaller homes." 4T Ruth Wyatt, with her husband an art therapist, said the steel will weather and eventually take on a more natural look, like a tree trunk, to fit into the environment. They say they also plan extensive planting and landscaping and will create a wildlife sanctuary in back. The neighbors are ''ignoring the fact that we have rights, too," said Kevin Wyatt, a graphic designer. "It could get ugly," he added, referring to the possible legal action by the neighbors. "I don't think they have a strong enough case to win." Although the Wyatts say they're spending $250,000 to $300,000 on the 4,500-square-foot house, some residents say the materials they plan to use are cheap and out of character. Neighbor Gina Boswell said she would like to work out a compromise, but when she saw samples the Wyatts showed the neighbors "I felt they were very sub-par. . . . This area is meant to have a certain integrity of building quality, and they don't meet that. They have a right to build a house there. But this sticks out." The Wyatts say brick would announce at a private reception tomorrow night that the figure has climbed to $23.9 million, said Logan McCulIoch, center development director. A charity watch sale held at Christie's Auction House in New York on Oct. 23 brought in $562,500 for the cause. The watches were donated by Au-demars Piguet, a manufacturer of fine Swiss watches. The auction was co-hosted by Ali and actor Arnold Schwarzenegger. About 1,200 people are expected to attend a Nov. 16 celebrity roast of Ali at the Century Plaza Hotel in Los Angel The house, still under construction, was designed by Samuel Mockbee, who runs the Rural Studio in Greensboro, Ala. be too expensive and would But Ravinia Avenue resident make the house heavier and Brenda Burchett said in a let-more obtrusive-looking. "It ter last week to 3rd Ward would be a solid monolith," Alderman Bill Allison that she Ruth Wyatt said. and her family "are horrified Man found in Louisville alley likely died of natural causes 7 It hits $23.9 The center recently received $1 million from Internet entrepreneur Peter Paul of Los Angeles and $1 million from an anonymous Kentuckian. An additional $400,000 has come from individuals and corporations since June. McCulIoch said the center expects to receive more than $50,000 from the Breeders' Cup charity gala held Friday night at the Kentucky International Convention Center. Louisville Mayor Dave Armstrong said he expects the response to fund raising to be overwhelming when word gets out. "People fondly remember RN Ram Fund raising for Ali Center The Courier-Journal A man found dead in a Louisville alley Sunday night was identified as James Lemay King, 65, of Logan Street, by the Jefferson County coroner's office. King probably died of natural causes, Deputy Coroner Sam south' Vfc,J ..... ic hi an "r 1 1 i i i i m ww BY STEVE DURBIN. THE C-J Jewell's friends, said they told her that they were looking for an adventure, "a point of excitement for the night." Biven said two members of the group had tried to discourage the others from crossing. About two dozen trains cross the trestle each day, Knopp said. Sizable gaps between the slats on the trestle add to the danger of crossing it on foot, Knopp said. "It's an absolute zero, no-win situation," Knopp said. Jewell was a 1999 graduate of Bullitt East High School, a student at the University of Louisville and a service technician for E&H Integrated Systems. He is survived by his parents, Leddy and Dianne Jewell; his fiancee, Jennifer Flood; a brother, Brett Jewell; and three grandparents, Lucille Tuell and Mr. & Mrs. Ledman Jewell Jr. The funeral will be at 11 a.m. Thursday at Foreman's in Jef-fersontown. Burial will be in Valley Cemetery in Taylorsville. Visitation will be 2-8 p.m. today and tomorrow. Weakley said yesterday. There were no signs of trauma, and the results of toxicology tests were not yet available, Weakley said. A graveside service for King will be tomorrow at River Valley Cemetery. Commonwealth-Stony Brook Funeral Home is handling arrangements. Sam Weakley said. The death has been ruled a homicide. Officer Robert Biven, a county police spokesman, said Smithers' girlfriend arrived home about 9.T5 p.m. Sunday and found him in bed, wounded. He was pronounced dead at University of Louisville Hospital. No arrest had been made. 40s.: 40s-, c ' rV FRONTS: E O C i- Snow to Bunny Pt Cloudy Cloudy Low: 6 at Cut Bank, Mont. OUTLOOK NORMAL 1 " awvl ! MUPiVtAL " 'iwe? qj), jf- - l Pre Flood Yester- Tornor- Next ( TAYLORSVILLE V R0AD f& Floyds Fork Park -3k NORMAL IILLC V Fatally wounded man identified es. Comedian Billy Crystal, a member of the Ali Center's national advisory board, will be master of ceremonies. Roasters will include Schwarzenegger, actress Sharon Stone and entertainers Red Buttons, Sinbad and John Lo-vitz. About $800,000 from the early sale of tickets is included in the $23.9 million capital-campaign total. At least $1.2 million more is expected to be raised from the roast, McCulIoch said. An anonymous donor is underwriting the event, so all proceeds can go to the center. Celebrity roast, sale of watches will aid effort By SHELDON S.SHAFER The Courier-Journal Charity events are helping raise money for the Muhammad Ali Center, which will honor the three-time heavyweight boxing champion and humanitarian from Louisville. In June, officials of the proposed center said they had raised $19.6 million. They will WEATHER: For current weather updates see From AP The Courier-Journal A 19-year-old man found shot to deatn in his apartment Sunday night was Deandre Smithers, the Jefferson County coroner's office said yesterday. Smithers, of 4200 Medallion Court, died of a gunshot wound in the head, Deputy Coroner TODAY IN THE NATION NATIONAL WEATHER CL Clear CY Cloudy Bands separate high temperature zones tor the day the National Weather Service, and Accu-Weather Temperatures indicate previous day's high TOsiITrV?rr--, . ji 40s ,- wvrw.courier-Journal.com LOUISVILLE FORECAST National Weather Service forecast; call 968-6025 munouMi j, V 3niA bos -;s t TODAY i PARTLY i ' CHANCE' SUNNY OF RAIN i wturuouHT million Muhammad Ali as ... a person who stands up for the right things in life, and he is recognized around the world as a peacemaker." Ali will not be able to attend tomorrow night's reception. But a new promotional video on the center narrated by Oprah Winfrey and including comments by former President Jimmy Carter and retired Gen. Colin Powell will be screened. The center seeks $60 million to build and $20 million to endow the center. The goal is to open in 2003. The center also has a Web site www.alicenter.org. SN Snow to 8 p m. Eastern time. Hi Lo Prec. Forecast 64 50 57 44 CL 71 55 72 50 CL 71 64 1,38 67 58 CY 81 68 84 68 CY 52 50 .03 56 48 CY 47 47 1.52 48 43 RN 82 69 .32 79 67 CY 63 49 .37 71 57 CY 79 72 .62 80 67 CY 58 43 59 42 CL 59 42 62 43 CY 50 50 .35 45 34 CY 41 41 1.82 34 30 SN 84 59 84 63 CY 57 38 60 37 CL 59 54 .49 62 49 CY 55 27 61 40 RN 47 42 .02 54 37 CY 54 .47 .24 53 39 CY 54 40 .02 56 38 CL 66 32 65 44 CY 29 25 22 15 SN 52 42 51 27 CY 60 33 62 39 CY 68 45 69 45 CL 67 47 .49 54 47 CY 39 32 .03 40 25 CY 75 59 1.32 71 50 CY 65 61 69 55 CL 65 53 70 50 CL 48 38 50 41 CY 51 45 .16 50 40 CY 50 27 55 30 CY 80 60 82 64 CY 84 67 84 66 CY 59 58 1 15 40 29 CY 63 48 57 42 CY 62 59 .36 49 35 CY 58 37 59 39 CY HI Lo City Hi Lo 53 51 66 33 70 60 67 56 52 46 56 49 68 8 91 77 73 50 47 33 4fi 37 80 60 81 59 Panama Pans Rio Rome San Jose San Juan Sant-aqo Sao Fauio San Salvador Seoul . . Singapore StockPOlm Sydney .. . Te: Avi. 91 91 .54 49 .79 73 66 53 78 65 84 71 72 52 82 67 84 68 69 44 90 76 45 36 66 6' 79 5b i; 4!J ;-j High High: FRIDAY CHANCE OF SHOWERS t " -.. T'-f" t -45 FAIR t f, . ji- f QQ-r . -.imjii nf AWiAjiwt.. i i wqgiMaBwan :i . 70 i R90 eeo z u 70 r-i -62- 5- ' 570 Or and overnight low lo Prec Forecast 32 54 33 CL 34 42 30 SN 22 33 21 CY 35 62 50 CY 57 65 55 RN 30 61 39 CL 29 58 38 CY 18 .02 29 13 CY 62 .19 76 61 CY 32 47 24 CL 41 .04 55 39 CL 70 85 62 CL 28 61 31 CY 48 76 58 CY 28 69 53 RN 39 60 50 CY 18 33 16 CY 45. .03 57 52 CY 36 .19 68 56 CY 31 61 46 RN 41 66 55 CY 36 65 52 CY 58 .79 56 46 CY 35 .01 65 52 CY 13 31 10 CY 52 .76 40 37 CY 37 59 45 CY 44 .83 44 42 RN 51 50 42 RN -9 10 -10 CY 42 .42 38 36 SN 28 .10 36 18 CY 36 58 36 CL 75 85 74 CL 61 1.33 72 53 CY 40 .36 60 45 CY 66 .19 75 57 CY 56 82 64 CY 33 .08 41 35 RN 57 1.42 43 34 CY City Las Vegas Los Angeles Memphis Miami Beach Milwaukee MplS-St Paul Mobile Nashville New Orleans New York City Norfolk.Va Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland.Mame Portland, Ore Providence Raleigh-Durham Rapid City Reno Richmond Sacramento St Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco St Ste Marie Seattle Syracuse Tallahassee Tampa-St Ptrsbg Topeka Tucson Tulsa Washington, D.C CHy W Albany, N.Y 52 Albuquerque 44 Anchorage 29 Asheville 61 Atlanta 60 Atlantic City 68 Baltimore 59 Billings 25 Birmingham 68 Boise 49 Boston 52 Brownsville 86 Buffalo 51 Charleston, S.C 71 Charleston, W.Va. ...70 Charlotte 66 Cheyenne 24 Chicago 53 Cincinnati 59 Cleveland 56 Columbia, SC 67 Columbus, Ohio 59 Dallas-Ft Worth 62 Davton 57 Denver 31 Des Moines 53 Detroit 56 Duluth 44 El Paso 58 Fairbanks 11 Fargo 47 Flagstaff 37 Hartford Spgfld 51 Honolulu 82 Houston 77 Indianapolis 54 Jackson, Miss 75 Jacksonville 80 Juneau 37 Kansas City 58 SUN ANQ MOON ' i SUNRISE 7.15 .m. I SUNSET 'J ; 5 38 p.m. I M00NRISE . 3:45 p.m. MODNSET: t 2 33 fin vi FULL MOON , i November 11 ' November 18 NEW MOON s -50- 30"- z REGIONAL OUTLOOK ED Ell 113 EID Low Shamrt Rain lutmt Fkiiriw YESTERDAYS EXTREMES 86 at McAllen and Brownville, Texas; Temperatures are for today's high and tonight's INDIANAPOLIS 57-44 low BL00MINGT0N O 60:45 EVANSVILLE LOUISVILLE nuvmnuGi Lit ' t FIRST OrR y . r " i Dcmbe' 3 , YESTERDAY High: 54; Low: 41 Normals: 61 and 40 Year ago: High: 76; Low: 52 Records: 79 in 1895; 24 in 1982 Precipitation: 0.27 inch. Month: 0.29 inch, 0.36 inch below normal. Year: 42.26 inches, 4.69 inches above normal. 70-50 CINCINNATI 63-54 LONDON 0 69-51 POLLEN A LEXINGTON 63-50 30 DAY TEMPERATURE For November M uiiru Ap.nit . U NORMAL rn ABOVE t NORMAL 'NORMAL " BELOW NORMAL 0 N0RMAL ri BELOW I I NORMAL I I MUCH BELOW I I NORMAL The following weather observations were compiled yesterday, based on the previous day s weather THE WORLD 64-47 PADUCAH ( BOWLING GREEN 72-52 O AIR POLLUTION YL-SIERDAY S HitMST READING Pollutant: Caibon monoxide Site: Downtown ' Time: 4 p.m. ; . Reading: 1.3 parts pnr m;;'.on City HI Lo Amsterdam 50 44 Athens 73 64 Auckland 63 57 Bangkok 86 65 COUNT BarOados 83 75 Barcelona 63 57 Beijing 68 40 Beirut 77 63 Belgrade 65 41 Berlin Bermuda Bogota ... Bnsbane . Budapest BA.ies 50 37 76 65 68 44 80 64 M 45 56 37 City Hi Lo City Cairo 79 6) Calgary 26 0 Caracas 81 68 Kiev La Paz Lima LisDon London . . Madrid . Managua Manna Mexico Cty Montreal Moscow N-a-iobi Nassau . 4t.v Deihi t s 1) . . Copenhagen .. 48 38 Uhahran Dublin ... F'anHurt 82 70 47 43 51 39 51 38 73 63 64 63 79 64 50 -11 79 72 b4 56 t-3 4" 79 Geneva Guatemala Hanci Havana Helsinki . Hong Kong Istanbul jeiuSnr' n wG burg UNHEALTHY MODERATE 15 GOOD OHIO RIVER TREES ; ABSENT GHASSES ABSENT WEEDS ABSENT MOLDS MODERATE lis r,ni P jsa. tow St rj liT.vny iser tomor- lexl 2h i :t 1 ?fi 1

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