The Courier-Journal from Louisville, Kentucky on May 23, 1997 · Page 4
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The Courier-Journal from Louisville, Kentucky · Page 4

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Louisville, Kentucky
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Friday, May 23, 1997
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Page 4
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6Z. B2 THE COURIER-JOURNAL FRIDAY, MAY 23, 1997 OU1SV1 lie .Water tower will look like new 4 .ffTOiw-wwi'Www imwi wwp ynwp jpwuiimw ,miui.ii mp-w I T- fVf - f "I I ,w H 'I ' ' V' tt t ' '"' i . ji YtfSy :t V l h' , , - Ml P f Ms 4' I 1 J V"- : t of; - 'A ' - BY ARZA BARNETT, THE COURIER-JOURNAL Bill Snellen worked at restoring a window to Its original condition at the Louisville Water Co. Tower off River Road yesterday. The $1.1 million renovation of the building, which houses the Louisville Visual Arts Association, is scheduled to be completed this fall. State, county prosecutors join to fight rise in juvenile violence By KIM WESSEL The Courier-Journal Jefferson County Attorney Mike Conliffe and Commonwealth's Attorney Dave Stengel say they've come up with a way to prosecute violent juvenile and gang-related crimes more effectively: Together. They have created what they call a Unified Special Prosecutions Unit, a team made up of both assistant county attorneys and assistant commonwealth's attorneys who will be able to follow a case from beginning to end. "I believe we are making history in the Commonwealth of Kentucky," Conliffe said. "I believe this is the first time the county attorney's office and the commonwealth's attorney's office have united together as one." The idea is to allow one prosecuting attorney to handle a case of alleged violence from the moment a juvenile is arraigned' to the moment he or she is sentenced, even if the arraignment is in District Court and the sentencing in Circuit Court. Until now, that couldn't happen. All juveniles start in Juvenile Court, which is a part of District Court, and only the county attorney's office prosecutes cases there. The more violent cases are sent to Circuit Court, where the juvenile is tried as an adult, and only the commonwealth's attorney's office prosecutes cases there. So one office would have to pass a case off to the next, and that has been an impediment, Stengel said. "It's not that the ball is dropped," he said. "It's just that, now, it won't even be handed off." By law, the county attorney's office and the commonwealth's attorney's office can agree to share prosecutorial duties in both courts. Conliffe and Stengel signed such an agreement yesterday. They are targeting violent juvenile and gang-related crime, namely murders, rapes, assaults and robberies. "As you know, juvenile and gang-related crime has become an increasing problem throughout the United States," Conliffe said. "Unfortunately, Jefferson County is no exception." He gave some statistics: Between 1990 and 1996, the total number of felonies involving juveniles in Jefferson County rose 48 percent. In that same period, the number of juveniles prosecuted as adults more than doubled, from eight in 1990 to 18 in 1996. "The system, as it works today, is adequate, but it is not as effective as it could be," Conliffe said. It will be more effective, he said, if the prosecutor who first gets to know a case interviewing the witnesses, working with the victims gets to close it. The new unit will be headed by Assistant Commonwealth's Attorney McKay Chauvin. Chauvin has been the division chief of one of the office's two general trial units for four years. The unit will include two other assistant commonwealth's attorneys, Joan "Jodie" Riebel and Craig C. Dilger, and two assistant county attorneys, Amy Ellis Smith and Michelle Bullard Stengel. Riebel has been with the commonwealth's attorney's office for four years, and in the last year she has concentrated on violent juvenile offenders. Dilger has been with the commonwealth's attorney's office for two years and has been assigned to the office's general trial division during that time. Smith has been with the county attorney's office for four years, specializing in Juvenile Court. Michelle Stengel, Dave Stengel's wife, has spent the past five years in Juvenile Court as an assistant county attorney. Kentucky Kingdom's summer hours to begin The Courier-Journal The Kentucky Kingdom amusement park in Louisville will begin its daily summer schedule tomorrow. Gates to the park at the Kentucky Fair & Exposition Center will open at 10 a.m. daily. Until the Kentucky State Fair starts in August, the park's ride hours will be 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, in cluding Memorial Day. The Hurricane Bay water park will be open from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day, starting tomorrow. The general admission charge is $24.95, up $1 from last year. The gate price covers all rides all day, including the water park, except for two rides that have additional charges. People under 54 inches tall and senior citizens 55 and over get in for $14.80. Children age 3 and under get in free. Season passes are available for $39.95 at all area Kroger stores through Sunday night. There also is a special deal this year everyone can get in for $9.95 after 5 p.m. every day. In addition to Chang, a $12 million stand-up roller coaster, other new features are the Dino Island Thrill Park Theater and the Thrill Karts, a ride that costs an extra $5. Youngsters visit Kentucky Capitol Head Start group meets with governor The Courier-Journal Jane Deutsch loves to see the looks on her students' faces when they arrive at Kentucky's Capitol in Frankfort. They are only 4 and 5 years old, but they know what's going on, she said. "Their faces just light up," said Deutsch, Head Start instructor at Luhr Elementary School in Louisville. "Even though they are so young, they still understand the concept of the state, the city, the capital and the basic facts of Kentucky." For the past five years, Deutsch has taught her Head Start students about state government and has taken them to Frankfort for a tour. Head Start is a federally funded program that provides services to low-income preschool children and their families. Yesterday, Deutsch and her assistant, Alicia Salmon, took a group of 12 students, a student's mother and a student's grandfather on a tour that included a leisurely lunch next to the floral clock, a tour of the Governor's Mansion and a visit with Gov. Paul Patton. Deustch said one student's first words to the governor were, "I heard you have peppermints in your pocket." . "They just get so excited when they see him," Deutsch said. "After talking about him and seeing pictures of him, all of a sudden he's here and he's real." a.-.- .J.-.i k- I u Iff- t 1 u f i 1 i ,: J PHOTOS BY STEWART BOWMAN, THE COURIER-JOURNAL Gov. Paul Patton got a hug from 5-year-old Aryka Gathright after she and Head Start classmates gave the governor a coffee cup filled with candy. 3 1 1 1 Kayla Goodlett, 5, left, and Andrea Mack, 4, Joined others for lunch near the floral clock. rmwrmww-m - . -Mm m-'-mw- jujii hui ihwujum ttM iw wi vwm wwg a . . i , '' it 1 1 1 f 1 f --I 5 3 i If bh ; -v ; , 'i (I i - f .1 i , ill If 1 J 'M fi 4 t s ...... a 4 V itfiBiyft1rTTfnli it in. ?v Tf fftf irf1Mr-J The energetic youngsters Inspected the Inside Dwayne McCauley Jr., 4, right, and Alan of the Capitol from every angle during their visit Lawson, 5, led classmates from the Capitol after to Frankfort. the tour, skipping as they went. A T UC D From ,he National Weather Service, W H f I nillA Ap and Accu-Weather LOUISVILLE FORECAST Milder temperatures today with a southeast wind at 5-10 mph. TODAY MOSTLY SUNNY SATURDAY M0STIY CLOUDY ' SUNDAY MONDAY , CHANCE OF SHOWERS CHANCE OF SHOWERS "5 100- 5 90" 70 r 50 11 40- rg 80 " 77 79" 67 605 S39 SO! REGIONAL OUTLOOK Temperatures are for today's high and tonight's low 9 PADUCAH 80-6: INDIANAPOLIS I 74-55 I I CINCINNATI I - f O mm LOUISVILLE Vrwv 7557 1 7S.65 V LONDON O J 75-55 BLOOMINGT0N 7555 EVANSVILLE 8-60 BOWLING GREEN 80-60 SUN AND MOON SUNRISE 6:26 a.m. SUNSET 8:54 p.m. M00NRISE 10:14 p.m. M00NSET 7:41a.m. LASTQTR. May 29 NEW MOON June S : FIRST QTR. June 12 FULL MOON ' ., June 20 YESTERDAY High: 68, low: 41. Year ago: high 80, low 55 Records: 94 in 1941, 37 in 1883 Precipitation: None Month: 3.20 inches, 0.17 inches belownormal Year: 30.27 inches, 1 1 .85 inches above normal. AIR POLLUTION YESTERDAY'S HIGHEST READING Pollutant: ; 150 Ozone bne: rem ureeK jgg Time: 5 p.m. Reading: X H2 parts, per million For today's itaJings. can oi-jjis u Internet: www.crhnwsn noaa gowtnik : UNHEALTHY : 52 -MODERATE 11 QCJ0 :Ui ULTRAVIOLET INDEX 8 HIGH INDEX SCALE QTQ 15 TIM1 TTAKFS i0 BUrtNAI MIUDAr 7 to 40 minutes POLLEN COUNT TREES HIGH GRASSES MODERATE WEEDS LOW MOLDS LOW Drs. Stephen Polljid and James Sublet! NATIONAL WEATHER CL-Clear CY-Cloudy Temperatures and precipitation for 24 hours ending City HI La Pree. Fartast Albany, N.Y 57 43 66 44 CL Albuquerque ... 65 49 .07 79 54 CY Anchorage 58 40 62 43 CY Atlanta 74 51 80 61 CY Atlantic City .... 68 39 67 55 CL Baltimore 67 43 71 46 CL Billings 74 49 80 50 CY Birmingham .... 72 47 79 62 CY Boise 81 49 75 50 CY Boston 62 47 .06 63 50 CY Brownsville 87 74 86 72 CY Buffalo 56 41 64 46 CL Charleston. S.C. 80 59 80 61 CL Charleston, W.Va. 65 38 74 49 CL Charlotte, N.C. .. 75 53 80 57 CL Cheyenne 69 50 .04 71 45 CY Chicago 58 37 73 53 CY Cincinnati 63 40 73 55 CL Cleveland 56 43 66 48 CY Columbia, S C. . 80 54 81 56 CL Columbus, Ohio 61 39 72 50 CL Dallas-Ft. Worth . 67 63 78 67 CY Dayton 59 40 73 52 CL Denver 76 50 .18 79 46 CY Des Moines .... 67 46 72 56 CY Detroit 60 40 71 50 CY Duluth 57 37 64 47 RN El Paso 83 56 89 60 CY Fairbanks 58 35 62 37 CY Fargo 76 44 .12 70 52 CY Flagstaff 62 38 71 37 CY Hartford, Conn. , 61 45 64 44 CY Honolulu 83 74 80 70 RN Houston 86 66 2 85 68 CY Indianapolis .... 62 39 74 55 CL Jackson, Miss. . . 67 62 1.11 82 64 CY Jacksonville .... 88 70 85 69 CY Juneau 73 49 67 48 CL Kansas City .... 70 51 75 60 CY RN Rain SN - Snow at 7 a.m. EST yesterday. Forecasts are for today, City HI to Prtc. Forced Las Vegas 91 71 . 91 65 CL Little Rock 77 53 80 63 CY Los Angeles.... 76 64 76 62 CL Memphis 74 52 79 65 CY Miami Beach ... 91 78 88 78 CY Milwaukee 51 34 68 51 CY MiravSL Paul .. 66 47 72 55 CY Mobite Nashville' ".'.'.'.'.'." 69 47 77 61 CY Orleans 84 69 1.55 85 70 RN New York City ,. 63 50 68 53 CY Norfolk, Va 70 54 72 55 CL Oklahoma City . , 74 62 72 62 CY Omaha 75 73 57 RN Orlando 93 70 87 70 CY Philadelphia .... 65 48 71 52 CL Phoenix 94 71 96 71 CL Pittsburgh 57 37 64 46 CL Portland, Maine . 63 41 65 44 CY Portland, Ore. .. 69 48 65 51 RN Providence 62 46 65 47 CY Raleigh-Durham , 75 45 77 54 CL Rapid City 77 55 .02 74 49 CY Reno 78 48 70 45 CY Richmond 73 44 74 49 CL Sacramento .... 81 58 78 54 CY St Louis 69 46 79 61 CY Salt Lake City .. 77 55 79 54 CY San Antonio .... 79 68 .07 80 67 CY San Diego 73 65 1 71 64 CY San Francisco . . 72 56 67 54 CY St Ste Marie ... 49 32 60 44 CY Seattle 64 45 " 64 49 CY Syracuse 54 43 .01 64 45 CL Tampa-St Ptrsbg 90 73 88 70 CY Topeka 72 49 73 60 CY Tucson 90 62 94 61 CL Tulsa 78 57 79 66 CY Washington, D.C. 68 48 72 54 CL THE WORLD City HI Lo Sky" Amsterdam ..60 50 CY Athens 96 66 CL Bangkok 96 80 CL Barbados .... 87 77 RN Barcelona 78 60 CL Beijing 82 57 CL Beirut 78 64 CL Berlin 55 46 RN Bermuda .... 77 64 RN Brussels 59 50 CY Budapest .... 80 57 RN Buenos Aires . f2 53 RN Cairo 89 60 CL Copenhagen . 42 41 CY Dublin 55 48 CY Frankfurt 56 50 RN Geneva 62 rii RN The following weather observations were compiled yesterday, paseo on me previous oay s weainer. City HI Lo Sky City Havana 87 73 CL Helsinki 50 33 CL Hong Kong . . 75 73 CY Istanbul 77 59 CL Jerusalem ... 77 53 CL Johannesburg 68 44 CL Lima 77 68 CY Lisbon 71 57 CY London 57 46 CY Madnd 78 53 CY Manila 96 73 CY Mexico City ..77 53 CY Montreal 57 42 CL Moscow 53 35 CY Nairobi 73 50 CY Nassau 89 71 CL New Delhi .. 105 80 CL HI Lo Sky Oslo Pans Rio Rome San Juan .... Seoul ... Singapore . . . Stockholm . . . Sydney Taipei Tel Aviv Tokyo Toronto Vancouver . . . Vienna Warsaw . Zurich 57 41 CY 62 48 CY CL CY CY CL 91 78 CL 51 35 CY 62 55 RN 78 71 RN 77 60 CL 66 53 CY 55 39 CL 60 48 CY 64 53 RN 62 53 RN 59 50 RN 86 73 51 84 73 73 51 TODAY IN THE NATION Forecast for noon today STATIONARY FRONT . f 1 COLD FRONT WARM FRONT YESTERDAY'S EXTREMES High: 102 at Lake Havasu, Ariz. Low: 26 at Iron Mountain, Mich. WARM SEAS, MORE HURRICANES Abnormally warm seas probably spawned 1995's unusual number of Atlantic hurricanes, scientists report. Eleven hurricanes developed from 19 tropical storms that formed over extra-warm seas directly west of Africa. That was double the 50-year average. "The fact that sea surface temperature affects the number of hurricanes each year is new," said meteorologist Mark Saunders of University College in London. In 1995, he said, the sea surface temperatures were the highest on record 0.7 degree Celsius above the 50-year average. This small increase could pump huge amounts of extra energy into storm systems. In contrast, records show that during the 1970s and 1980s sea temperatures were lower than average, and there were fewer hurricanes. With more research, meteorologists may be able to predict, at least roughly, how many hurricanes to expect in a given year. OHIO RIVER Readings taken at or forecast for 7 a m. (in feet). (L) Lower gauge. (U) - Upper gauge Flood Yester- Tomor- Next Location stsge day Today row day Cincinnati 52 Markland (L) 51 Louisville (U) 23 Louisville (L) 55 29.7 220 20.7 12.6 303 228 21.9 12.3 29 4 28 6 22.0 20.4 21.8 19.8 12.1 12.1 Flood Yester- Tomor- Next Location stage day Today row day Cannelton(L) 42 17.1 17,7 182 174 Newburgh(LI....,...38 19.8 20.8 21.6 208 Evansville 42 18.1 19.2 19.9 19.2 Uniontown(L) 37 184 18.8 19.5 19.1 V

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