Garden City Telegram from Garden City, Kansas on October 31, 1962 · Page 7
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

Garden City Telegram from Garden City, Kansas · Page 7

Publication:
Location:
Garden City, Kansas
Issue Date:
Wednesday, October 31, 1962
Page:
Page 7
Start Free Trial
Cancel

Contracts for KU Stadium Project to Be Let Tomorrow LAWRENCE — Going onto the, final week of October, the Uni- j versity . f Kansas Stadium Ex-| pansion Fund drive is 65 oer cent toward its 8200,000 toal. In divulging this figure, which amounts to approximately $130,000 in cash, or pledges, Gene Morgan, Kansas City, chairman of this private solicitations campaign said: "Some regions are beyond their goals already. Oth-, er are behind. If we had set a schedule for ourselves you'd have to say we have followed it up to now. We are confident that all regions will meet their goals or come close enough to have the slight differences covered by ov- ersubscription in other regions." Morgan heads a corps of 12 regional chairmen who are work- Harrier Returns Home in Taxi ARCATA, Calif. (AP) - Jerry Blueford, a freshman from Oakland, Calif., decided to give up football and joined the cross country squad at Humboldt State College. He went out for a run Tuesday —and got lost. Blueford ended up in Arcata's residential area about 11 blocks from the campus. The youngster wasn't nonplussed, however. He called a cab. Four bits (fifty cents) worth later he was back on campus, reoriented, if somewhat heckled ing throughout the State. Regional chairman for Southwest Kansas is Paul Masoner, Garden Ci«y. Morgan also said seats in the new area, which will extend the west stadium upward 27 rows, already are being assigned'as contributions are recorded. The campaign opened September 24, two days after the original Athletic Board proposal had been okayed by the State Board of Regents. The $200,000 solicitation fund will handle approximately one- third of the anticipated $600,000 cost for the project. Another $200,000 will be drawn from Athletic Department reserves; a third $200,000 from a 20-year loan. Contracts for the project will be let November 1, with construction to begin soon afterward. Cuban Crisis Hassle Flares THIS IS AN architect's drawing of enlarged Memorial Stadium at Kansas University. The view looks north with tha planned addition on the west side. It will add 6,500 seats from end line to end line along the west straightaway, plus a 3-tiered press box. Paul Masoner of Garden City is one of the regional chairman for the expansion fund. Completion is scheduled comfortably ahead of the home opener next season, September "8, against Syracuse. The addition will add 6,500 seats from end line to end line along the west straightaway, plus a three-tiered, press box, which will include facilities for press, radio and television. Ex; insion thus wili increase stadium capacity to 4-!.300. WASHINGTON (AP) - Political argument over the Cuban crisis flared up again today after a Democratic spokesman's suggestion that Gen. Dwight r Eisenhower bow out of Hit campaign. Indignant Republicans found no validity in a complaint by Sen. Vance Hartke, D-Ind., that some of Eisenhower's barnstorming statements might be misleading because they indicated "there is room for criticism of th c position taken by the President" in the Cuban missile threat. At Gettysburg! Pa., a spokesman said Eisenhower was not available for comment Hartke told a news conference Tuesday He was speaking only for the Democratic senatorial campaign committee he heads and not for the White House when he suggested Eisenhower give erious consideration to cancc ; n; future campaign appearances. Hartke was vague about the i\ Page 7 Garden City ^Wednesday, Oct. 31, 1962 rv specific Eisenhower statements to which he objected He said that among other things the former Republican president had left "the clear implication that this crisis is no different from any other one." -He said this could be interpret-, ed abroad as indicating that there was not solid support for President Kennedy's action i... f derin;£ the quarantine of offensive arr^sT shipments and demanding the dis-' mantling of missile bases. !'. Albert Einstein predicted that one of the proofs of his theory of relativity would be an apparent shift in the position of stars whose light rays passed through the sun's field of gravity. Photographs during a 1952 eclipse of the sun tend to bear him out. t I The worsted double knit suit at its worldliest making its own 3- piece costume. It circles the clock, the calendar or the continent with superb sophistication and versatility. by Bettijean LEFT: Bettijean's .worsted double-knit suit, edited in Italia, has the world on a string! It circles the clock, the calendar or the continent with equal versatility. Remove the demi-jack-et, dashed with antique brass buttons to reveal a provocative tri-color blouson top! $69.95 RIGHT: A trend setting suit in the best Chanel manner. Smart cardigan and contrast- banded jacket covers a happy, wearable matching top. Imported, worsted double- knit in a quality used by the best couturier lines of Europe. Skirt and jacket fully lined. $69.95 \ LEFT: Nothing is newer and smarter than the young, feminine look of the defined waistline. This style in lovely Unique fits this category. Carefully fitted, delightfully double-toned, belted and bowed with leather. $49.95 RIGHT: The secret of this luscious Heritage collar is darting and pleating. The soft pleat intensifies its extravagant beauty. The fabric does the rest . . . exciting Mellora wool with a velvety touch. $779.95 $75.00 Double-knits are doubly smart when , Carlye uses color on color, gives you the great look of a cutaway taillcuf newly enlivened by touches of embroidery. Stop and Shop With Us... You're Always Welcome! ^ * JOIN THE CROWD! LEARN THE WAY! IN GARDEN £ITY IT'S NOW . . . The Shop EARLIEST WITH THE LATEST $49.95 A cowled neck, a buttoned tab, a sun» burst of tucks on a double-knit... all add up to this-niinuta news in the Carlya Make this your favorite tliis Fall!

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,200+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free