The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on April 16, 1942 · Page 10
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 10

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Thursday, April 16, 1942
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Page 10
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ilPlGETEN BLYTHEV1LLE, (ARK.) COURIER NEWS THURSDAY, APRIL 1C, 1942 BY PETER EDSON NBA Service Washington \ s .._ • Correspondent >/WASHINGTON, April 16.^Jock- eyihg for post-war positions by the international airlines is going on •with intense 'rivalryin spite of the •war;' and with the 'wartime boom iii'aviation, this unquestionably will be :ohe of the bigest battles, for commercial supremacy after peace is ;declared. Imperial Airways, the British monopoly, is watching hawklike arid, jealous over the advances which the'u: S. -Army Air Force Ferrying Command has made in establishing bases in Africa, the Near East and India. Pan-American 'Airways is aiding the Ferrying Command in this-development, and that's what makes .imperial Airways nervous, fearing establishment' <tf •competitive routes. In America, • Northwest Airlines wants, to establish a route to Alaska across Canada i'rom Chicago. It A Cordial Welcome Awaits You at Beauty Bar One of the finest, most •modern. shops in Northeast Ar- lunsas. Phone 3202 Glencoe Bid?. would compete with Trans-Canada Airways, and there is much feuding behind the scenes. A decision is expected soon from the Civil Aeronautics Board on American Airlines' ^petition to establish a route from El- Paso to Mexico City, which would compete •with the Pan American Airways routes from Brownsville, Laredo, Los Angeles to Mexico City. i Another threat to P. A. A.'s leadership! is American Export, which wants to get into the business with a route to Lisbon, or any place in Europe. German and Italian lines have been kicked out of South America, but all this international competition of the Dig flying companies will get hotter as the war goes on. . * * * This is the way Civil Service employment boi)s down. Thirty million information circulars were distributed to prospects last year. Seven million communications were received. Four million people came into the central and 13 district Civil Service offices. Two and a half million persons took the competitive examinations for jobs. But only 250,000 were appointed to positions in the classified service# * * SEEKING A SEER The married or single status of new workers coming to Washington has been completely reversed since the war began. Before the war, the ratio was 60 per cent married. That has further complicated Washington's housing shortage. How many of taese new govern- Just Received a Carload of FLORENCE OIL RANGES :TMs Beautiful Florence Table-Top-Range Love, It Seems, Is Also in Bloom m EMPLOYES L. Blossoming cherry trees from the land these boys soon may fight form the frame for their romantic \ interlude. Soldiers and girls gaze across Washington's tidal basin at the Jefferson Memorial. [Like Stove above except with ; black sides. ment workers are going to stay in Washington is another puzzler. Be fore the first World War, the .government employes numbered about 35,000. By November, 1938, the figure had lumped to 118,000, but many people thought that was a mere temporary high and that the new workers would all go home. Instead, most of them stayed. Today, the government has about 235,000 workers in Washington, and the number may go to 400,000 before the war's over. Will they all have to stay in the capital after peace is declared? Anyone who knows the answer can help decide how much of Washington's new housing wili have to be perma- ment, and how much can be temporary barracks. T- * * Another factor complicating Washington's housing problem is that so many of the new workers come from small towns and have the walk-to-work habit. They insist on getting a room within easy walking distance of their job. That throws a big load of roomers in the already overcrowded downtown area, while nearly 5000 rooms are reported for rent within 30 or 45 minutes commuting distance Notice of Sale—Notice is hereby given tliat the undersigned mort- gagee in a mortgage executed by Ernest Winston to the United States on the 9th day of April, 1941 and duly filed in the office of the Recorder in and for Mississippi County, Arkansas; the said Ernest Winston having waived all rights of appraisement, sale and redemption under the laws of .the State of Arkansas; pursuant to the powers granted under 'the terms of the aforementioned mortgage, and by the laws of the State of Arkansas, will on the 23rd day of April, 1942. between the hours of 1 o'clock in the afternoon and 2 o'clock in the afternoon of said date, at Bill Hard in's farm, RFD No. 1, Box No. 8$, Osccola, in the County of Mississippi, State of Arkansas, offer for sale to the highest and best bidder for cash, 1 Bay Horse Mule. 1 Yellow Horse Mule, 2 sets harness; and, will on the 23rd day of April, 1942. between the hours of 2 o'clock in the afternoon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon of said date, at C. E. Scoggins Farm, RFD No. 1, Manila, in the County of Mississippi, State of Arkansas, offer for sale to the highest and best bidder for cash, 1 Yellow Jersey Cow, 1 Middle Buster, quarters Barn at Missco Project, in the County of Mississippi, State of Arkansas, offer for sale to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property, to-wit: I Dark Bay Horse Mule, 1 Light Bay Mare Mule, 1 Harrow, 1 Cultivator, 1 Planter, 1 Middle Buster, 1 Turning Plow, 1 Wagon, 2 sets harness. Witness my hand this the 15th day of April, 1942, United States of America, By David C. Neal, County Supervisor. of the government offices concen- 1 Turning Plow, 1 Cultivator, 1 Planter. 1 Harrow, 1 Wagon. Wit- TJiis 'pleasing range has all the features of more expensive rang- esl. Its features include five burn- ersy roomy oven with insulation in lop and door and porcelain side linings. It is finished in white and baked-on enamel. Model TL 5 FLORENCE CONSOLE OIL RANGE A practical open front range ai an extra low price. Five burners, three beneath cooking top, two under oven. Roomy cooking top. Only $3995 tration area. NO STEEL-SO NO RUDDER Big catch on the possibilities of making more synthetic rubber so that civilians can ride in 1944 is, strangely enough, lack of steel. Before you can have a synthetic rubber, you must build a synthetic rubber plant. That takes steel, and with all the demands for steel for ships, railroad cars, tanks and munitions, there isn't enough steel for more rubber plants. Enough has been allocated to build plants that will maxe synthetic rubber at the rate of 700,000 tons a year. But all that will go to war. Only hope lor more synthetic rubber plants is the discovery of some "way to reallocate steel. * * * Letting down his hair at a press conference, WPB boss Donald M. Nelson explained his philosophy of operation. ID is, briefly, to get free expression on the widest possible differences of opinion on all matters of policy. College economists, labor leaders and industrialist are all invited to present a broad range of ideas and from a balanced point of view obtained. The job of looking at the war pro- ness my hand this the 15th day of April. 1942. United States of America, By David C. Neal, County Supervisor. Notice of Sale—Notice is hereby given that the undersigned mort- gagee in a mortgage executed by C. N. Sandusky to the United States on the 25th day of March, 1940 and duly filed in the office of the Recorder in and for Mississippi County, Arkansas; the said C. N. Sandusky having waived all rights of appraisement, sale and redemption under the laws of .the State of LOS ANGELES. (UP)—The "suggestion box", that often neglected but long ^established institution in many American offices and factories, has come into its own in Southern California's aircraft idustry. . Aware that many a time-saving plan lurks in the back of a skilled employe's head, the major aircraft factories in this area are expanding programs to encourage em- ploye suggestions for increased efficiency. A survey by the Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce .shows that the various airplane companies are paying bonuses ranging from 25 cents in defense stamps to $1,500 in cash for every workable idea submitted. During the month of March, the survey disclosed, the companies spent more than $10,000 on suggestions and improvements submitted by employes. Ideas Compete on Merit Although the "suggestion box" accent is on speeding-up produ- tion, rewards are also being paid for ideas which might help to Improve methods, conserve material, reduce handling, combine operations, conserve energy and increase safety. All of these- ideas iare solicited by the suggestion box method. Placed in convient locations throughout, ine plants, these boxes are equipped with blanks on which the employes can sketch or outline their sugestions. Filled-in forms are picked up at regular intervals, and, at some plants, pick-ups are made daily with all suggestions promptly acknowledged. All ideas of the employes compete on their merits alone and axe submitted anonymously before an impartial committee of experts before they are discarded or accepted. Suggestions Increase After each suggestion is accepted, the company's Time Study Department studies the amount of time the device or idea might conceivably save. It is then forwarded to the (Production Research Division for active production ' evalu- the motor and propeller design of the engines they were putting on their planes,. even .though their company old not produce the engines. One employe suggested that i\ Red Crass mobile unit be asked to stop by to collert blood at the various plants, while another, in an effort to streamline the suggestion box itself, offered a new type of blank designed to reduce to a minimum tne amount of time and trouble required to make a suggestion. This idea won him $10. MIND YOUR MANNERS M. *!• v. t. »AT. Test your knowledge of correct social usage by answering the following questions, then checking against the authoritative answers below: 1. If you have a dog should you feel responsible for keeping him in his own yard instead of letting him run loose over the neighborhood? 2. If a neighbor complains youi dog has ruined her flowers, should you consider her a crank and do nothing about it? 3. Should a person who stil drives an automobile be more generous than ever in giving others a lift, if it doesn't mean he wil have to go out of his way to do so? 4. is it gracious for a hostes to refuse to give a guest a recip for a dish the hostess has served her? 5. Is it good manners for a mat to say to his wife, "Why don't w ever have coffee tMs good a home?" in an effort to please hi hostess? What would you do if— You bump into a friend that you lave neglected for some time— (a) Say, "I'm just ashamed to face you; I've neglected you so shamefully"? (b) Act delighted to see tho friend? Answers 1. Yes. 2. No. Do what you can to marf^t up for the damage, and keep your* dog at home. 3. Yes. 4. No. it.looks small and selfish. 5. No. His first loyalty is to his wife. Better "What solution—(b). Would You Do" Law Says Curb Your Chicks RIDGHFIELD, Wash. (UP)—The city council here has adopted an ordinance which provides a $50 fine for owners who permit their chickens to scratch up gardens or flower beds of their neighbors. There are more than 40 square miles of glaciers on Mount Ranier. Start The Day With— 7-DAY COFFEE A Maxwell House product, blended by MaxWll llousc. Regular Trice 1 lb. 25c 3 Ibs. 69c (Watch for week-end Special) Exclusive at— Pickard's Grocery 1044 Chickasau-ba Ffc. 2U« Arkansas; pursuant to the powers granted under the terms of the aforementioned mortgage, and by the laws of the State of Arkansas, will on the 23rd clay of April, 1942, between the hours of 3 o'clock in the afternoon and 4 'o'clock in the afternoon of said date, at John Foster's Farm, Keissr, in the County ation, such as: how much material the idea might save; how much time it might save, or whatever oter advantages it might offer. •Since Dec. 7, the survey shows, suggestions have been pouring in at a record rate. One Southern California plant alone- received m/ove than 1,000 ideas in I've of Mississippi, State of Arkansas, \ "weeks from its employes, while nearly every company reports a Notice of Sak—Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, mort- gagee in a mortgage executed by Raymond L. Batey to the United States on the 7th day of March, 1940, and duly filed in the office of the Recorder in and for Mississippi County, Arkansas; the said Raymond L. Batey having waived offer for sale to the highest and best bidder for cash, 1 Bay Mare Mule. 1 Bay Horse, 2 sets harness; and, "will on the 23rd day of April, 1942, between the hours of 4 o'clock in the afternoon and 5 o'clock in the afternoon of said date, at W. T. Floyd's Farm, Keiser. in the County of Mississippi, State of Arkansas, offer for sale to the highest and best bidder for cash, 1 Middle Buster, 1 Turning Plow, 1 Cultivator, 1 Harrow, 1 Wagon. Witness my hand this the 15th day of April, 1942, United States of America, By 15 per cent increase in employes' suggestions. Workers at one aircraft plant became so enthhsiastic over "idea bonuses" .they . submitted a number of sugegstions on ways to improve 'Special to Housewives' We Repair— Girdles, Baby Pants, Hot Water Bottles, Ice Bags, Rubber Boots or anything made out of rubber. Call us. Phone 2201 Highway 61 North duction problems sinner point of from the view has con been all rights of appraisement, sale and' David C. Neal, county Supervisor, redemption under the laws of the State of Arkansas; pursuant to the jowers granted under the terms of the aforementioned mortgage, and by the laws of the State of Arkansas, will on the 24th day of April, 1942, between the hours of 1 o'clock in the afternoon and 2 o'clock in the afternoon of said date, at Head- PRESCRIPTIONS Freshest Stock Guaranteed Best Prices Kirfay Drug Stores EASTERN STATE it. HUBBARD FURNITURE CO, turned over to Leon Henderson Nelson al.so indicates that he ! is looking at the problem of aiding the small businessman and the little manufacturer not as any social issue, but as a practical necessity. Bclore rhe war production effort reaches its full capacity, the output of every machine in the country Is going to be needed. The idea is to put every one of these machines to work, even if its only a small lathe in a plant I maintenance tool room. The saxophone was invented in 1840 by Adoiphe Sac, and introduced into French army bands in 1845. m BUT THE SLOW WAY WINS m. HORIZONTAL 1 Depicted state- 9 Reveres. 10 Symbol for gold. 11 Early English (abbr.). L2 Female saint (abbr.). 13 Cuckoo. H Beret. 16 Transactions (abbr.). 13 Compass point 19 Make clear. 22 Notary public (abbr.)/ 24 Frozen desserts. 25 Postscript (abbr.). 26 Bird. 29 Organ of hearing. 32 Sardinia (abbr.)- 33 Puffed/ 34 Greece (abbr.). 35 Weaving machine. 38 Railway (abbr.). Answer to Previous Puzzle ..•Especially In Making Whiskey! It's no fable that the "slow" way wins. In whiskey— if$ a Joel! You have to let your whiskey age to just the right richness—just the right smoothness. That's why we still make T. W. Samuels the "oid- ' fashioned slow" way we started 100 years ago. Yes! That's why T. W. Samuels— Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, every drop —is a favorite with men wholknow their bourbon best. Try some, yourself. See if you don't agree: "Drop for drop—drink for drink—this-whiskey is a winner!" ... Product of .Country Distillers Products, Inc. Dcatsville, Kentucky. SrtH mode rf» "OW-Fo$Wof»d Stow" Way, f/>i/s: iCOSTS MGRfTO MAKE-YET NOT TO DRINK! 39 Triteness, 41 One who provides food. 44 Sister (abbr,). 45 Altitude (abbr.). 48 It was one of the 13 colonies. 49 Nine and one. 51 Dawn (comb, iorm). 52 Comfort?. 53 Fire fighters. 55 Natives of Sweden. 15 Part of "I." 17 Severe blows 20 Chinese measure. v 21 Bitter vetch. 22 Pen point 23 Chum. 27 Rowing implement. 28 Twisted. 30 Snake. 31 Awakeners. 34 Gleans, 36 Inflammation of the ear. 37 Medical doo 5.6 Sweets served tor (abbr.). at'the end o£ 39 Cost a meal. 40 Babylonian; Vr-RTIPAT <*eity. VERTICAL 41 Measure. -: 1 Encounter. 42 In a row 1 . 2 At sea- 43 Minced oath". '3 Right (abbr.) 46 List of 4 Affirmative. candidates 5 Leafy (Scot), vegetable. 47.2000 pounds Getting Service that Conserves Your Car? Come in for service by Authorized Factory-trained Mechanics who • know how to make cars last longer \ 6 To" mulct. 7 Nova Scotia (abbr.). 8 Stills. 10 Its capital" is . (Pi.). 50 Born. 53 Symbol ior iron. 54 Written form of mister. T HERE'S a big difference between servicing a car and 22 25 41 52 55 30 ZO 43 t m LflM 56 B 25 35 44 53 I 36 26 1 21 32 37 50 if 40 54 38 46 47 5) 16 The first simply takes care of needed matters — the second attends to them in a way that prolongs car-life. For example—now's the time to change to spring and summer oil and lubricants. But if you want longest car-life, it's also the time to check up on motor efficiency, gas mileage, wheel alignment, clutch and brake condition, battery condition and general tightness. Buick Spring Servicing includes many of those things — then goes farther. Every car brought to dBuick dealer for regular seasonal service also gets a complete check-up by a factory- trained mechanic ABSOLUTELY WITHOUT COST. This check-up helps Conserve Your Car by showing its exact condition, and uncovering any special attention it may need in the near future. Why not get Spring Servicing that includes this EXTRA safeguard of long life at no extra charge? Better Buy Buick SERVICE LAHGSTOH-WltOTEN CO Walnut & Broadway. Phone 553, Blvthevillc

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