Carrol Daily Times Herald from Carroll, Iowa on April 5, 1976 · Page 1
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Carrol Daily Times Herald from Carroll, Iowa · Page 1

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Carroll, Iowa
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Monday, April 5, 1976
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Iowa a place to grow Carroll Daily Times Herald Vol. 107 — No. 67 Carroll, Iowa, Monday, April 5, 1976 — Ten Pages Dflncrt'd h> Carrier Kach Kvi'inriK fur HOc I'cr Week 15c Copy Lawyer Says Massacre Figure Will Be Paroled Refuse Calley Conviction Review -Statf Photo Cleanup Slot — Spec. 4 Dennis Trecker, Templeton, carried branches to an Army Reserve truck Saturday morning as part of the Carroll spring clean-up campaign. The local reserve unit picked up trash and discards residents placed by the street in North Carroll Saturday. City employes staged a pick up in South Carroll Friday. Four trucks and 11 reservists worked Saturday, hauling more than 20 loads to the landfill. Republicans Elect, Draft Platforms _ By The Associated Press Nearly 3,500 Iowa Republicans met at district caucuses Saturday to elect party officials and draft platforms. In a break from tradition, the district platforms will be used as the basis for the state platform this summer. Previous state platforms were written by a committee of party faithful. In the 1st District caucus held at Iowa City, land use and agriculturaltax values were the platform planks that stirred the most debate. A measure calling for adoption of farm land valuation entirely on productivity was overwhelmingly defeated. A resolution calling for adoption of a state land use Inside Tornado season arrives in Iowa — Page 10. Whole family involved in Jaycee activities — Page 5. Women's news — Page 4. Editorials —Page 3. Deaths, daily record, markets, late news — Page 2. Sports CHS girls comparable to last year's team, Friedman, Gradoville lead Knights; Richard Astros' opening _ choice — Pages 6 and 7. . plan with local control subject to state guidelines narrowly remained in the platform. In northeast Iowa's 2nd District, 'delegates approved a proposal favoring reduction of criminal penalties for possession of small amounts of marijuana. They also voted in favor of supporting stricter penalties for persons convicted of selling drugs. The 3rd District caucus was held at Waverly where delegates defeated a suggested plank that would have raised the drinking age to 19. Unlike 2nd District Republicans, they shouted down resolutions opposing criminal penalties for possession of marijuana. Delegates to the 4th District met in Des Moines and registered their opposition to allowing 65-foot, twin-trailer trucks on the state's highways. When Atty. Gen. Richard Turner attempted to introduce a resolution favoring reinstatement of the death penalty for premeditated murder he was ruled out of order. Meanwhile, Republicans at the 5th District caucus at Harlan approved a platform plank reinstating the death penalty for premeditated murder. They also voted in favor of repealing the motorcycle hel- Caucuses, See Page Z WASHINGTON (AP) -The Supreme Court today refused to review the conviction of former Army Lt. William L. Calley Jr. for the murder of civilians in the Vietnamese hamlet of My Lai in March, 1968. An attorney,for Calley said he has been told by the secretary of the Army that Calley will be placed on immediate parole. "The secretary of the Army has stated and I have been assured by the counsel for the secretary of the Army, the general counsel, that Calley will be placed upon parole and will continue to live the life that he is presently living," Arrest 11 in D.M. Vice Raid DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Police vice officers arrested 11 people and seized more than $30,000 in what authorities described as the largest gambling raid here in recent years. Authorities said they had received anonymous calls from women who said their husbands had lost considerable money in dice games at a club in the central parfof the city. Lt. Lawrence Carpe, head of the vice unit, said three plainclothes officers were examined through a peephole at the club Sunday night, then were admitted after one man inside thought an officer looked like a friend. Officers identified themselves once inside and began making arrests. Carpe said there was a large craps'table in the club,"a~ fully" • stocked bar and a buffet table laid out with chicken and other food. A second room contained a small lounge and coolers in which beer was kept, he said. . Carpe said the building is owned by Donald Butcher, 42, Des Moines., and rented to George R. Likens, 38, Des Moines and Jack A. Taylor, 22. Indianola. The police officer said , Likens and Taylor ran gambling games at Broadway Frank's Little Vegas, a tavern north of here, before the Iowa Legislature tightened up the gambling statute last year. Butcher was charged with operating a disorderly house where gambling is permitted and Likens and Taylor were each charged with operating an illegal gambling house and frequenting a disorderly house. Others arrested and charged with frequenting a disorderly house were: James Palmas, 40, Ames; Voula Palmas, 25, Ames; and several Des Moines men — John J. Listen, 45; Ronald D. McDowell, 38; Peter P. Spilling 41; James Scott, 51; James D. Howe, 33 and Glen A. Syverson,46. Area Forecast Clear Monday night, lows in lower 40s. Some increase in cloudiness Tuesday, highs in mid 60s. said the attorney, J. Houston Gordon, contacted in Covington, Tenn. "He (Calley) will not be returned to prison, for which we are quite grateful. He will be placed on immediate parole." The justices let stand an 8-5 decision of the U.S. Circuit Court in New Orleans reinstating Galley's 1971 court martial conviction. Calley. 32, who is free on bail, appealed his conviction on two principal grounds: —That he was denied a fair tfial because of "worldwide and all-pervasive" publicity in which he was "labeled ... as a ghoul who had wantonly mas- sacred hundreds of innocent civilians." —That Congress should have been compelled to release confidential information for use in his trial just as former President Nixon was required to do in the Watergate scandal. Calley has been living as a civilian in Columbus, Ga., since his conviction was overturned on Sept. 25. 1974. by U.S. District Judge J. Robert Elliott of Columbus. Although the circuit court reversed this decision the Army released Calley on bail in 1974 and has said it does not plan to return him to prison. Calley was accused of killing 102 Vietnamese civilians in a sweep through My Lai. He was convicted of murdering at least 22 and was sentenced to a life term. Subsequent appeals reduced the term to 10 years before he was freed on bail. J. Houston Gordon of Covington, Tenn.. Galley's attorney, told the justices that Congress denied Calley his constitutional rights by withholding potential evidence. The House Armed Services Committee refused to let the defense look at the results of its My Lai hearings, comprising 3,045 pages of testimony by 151 witnesses. The government asked the high court to let the conviction stand, saying Calley "was not tried in an atmosphere of persecution" and release of the Congressional data would not have affected the outcome of his trial. Gordon argued that the privilege claimed by Congress was similar to Nixon's claim of executive privilege to withhold tapes and documents wanted by the prosecution in the Watergate cover-up trial. The Supreme Court, by an 8-0 vote, ordered Nixon to yield the material. On the issue of publicity. Gordon argued that "legal Demos Scramble for 2 States' Votes James Callaghan By The Associated Press Democrats Jimmy Carter and Morris K. Udall, each pre- •dicting victory in Wisconsin's presidential primary, scrambled for support there today, while Washington Sen. Henry M. Jackson concentrated on New York. Voters in both states decide Tuesday on distribution of 274 delegates to this summer's Democratic National Convention — 206 in New York Callaghan Named as Prime Minister LONDON (AP) — Foreign. Secretary James Callaghan was named to succeed Harold Wilson today as prime minister and leader of Britain's ruling Labor party. He is a strong advocate of improved relations betwe'en Western Europe and the United States. Callag'han, 64. who represented his party's center-right majority, Defeated Employment Secretary Michael Foot, 62, a left-winger, in a vote by Labor members of Parliament. He got 176 votes to 137 for Foot. The new Labor party leader was assured of an early evening summons to Buckingham Palace from Queen Elizabeth II. Her royal assent, a formality, is needed to make him prime minister. Wilson. 60, announced his resignation March 16. saying he wanted to retire at that age. He said he also wanted to give his successor at least two years in office before the next election, which must come by 1979. Wilson said in an interview today that he feels 20 years younger now that he is stepping down but that he has two great disappointments — his failure to settle the Rhodesian problem and the strife in Northern Ireland. Wilson was due to go to Buckingham Palace shortly to recommend that the queen name Callaghan as his successor. Callaghan was due to arrive an hour later and kiss the queen's hand on being asked to form a government. Callaghan is a personal friend of Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger. The two men consult regularly by telephone. As prime minister he is expected to urge closer ties between the United States and the nine-nation European Common Market. ' Callaghan will come to No. 10 Downing Street with more experience in office than many of his predecessors. He has already held the three top cabinet posts besides prime minister — foreign secretary, home secretary and chancellor of the exchequer. Under the British system, when the prime minister resigns, the party with the most seats in the House of Commons, in this case Labor, chooses a new leader and he automatically becomes prime minister. A total of 313 Labor members of Parliament voted today out of 317 eligible to cast ballots. It took three ballots to find a successor to Wilson. Six candidates took part, all of them cabinet ministers. One was knocked out after the first ballot — Environment Secretary Anthony Crosland. Two others — Home Secretary Roy Jenkins and Energy Secretary Tony Benn — withdrew. The second ballot eliminated Chancellor of the Exchequer Denis Healey. and 68 in Wisconsin. Jackson has spent less time in Wisconsin than Carter or Udall, concentrating his efforts in New York. He has said he will win more than half the New York delegates, although his campaign manager in the state. Donald Manes, predicted recently that the senator would get only 35 to 40 per cent of the vote. President Ford is expected to get a large share of the Republican delegates at stake Tuesday in both states. Ronald Reagan, the former California governor challenging Ford for the GOP nomination, spent little time in Wisconsin and listed delegate slates in only four of New York's 39 congressional districts. Reagan was due in Texas today for a 72-hour visit aimed at rounding up backing for the state's May 1 primary..He scheduled appearances in Dallas today and Tuesday, followed by stops in Wichita Falls, Abilene, Lubbock and Longview. The White House said Ford would visit Texas at week's end. Strong showings in Wisconsin and New York are considered crucial to Udall. yet to win a primary election, and the Arizona congressman didn't hedge Sunday when asked for a forecast. "Mo Udall's going to win in Wisconsin and we're going to give Scoop Jackson a real run for his money in New York." he said on NBC's "Meet the Press." Carter, speaking Sunday at the University of Wisconsin's LaCrosse campus, said flatly he would win the state. Traffic Deaths DES MOINES, Iowa (AP)The Iowa highway death count through midnight Sunday as prepared by the Iowa Department of Public Safety: This year to date —141 Last year to date—129 Lt. William Calley Jr. Sue to Bar Insurance Payment A lawsuit has been filed alleging the Oct. 20 fire which destroyed Sir Patrick's Restaurant and Lounge in Carroll was caused by arson, thus the loss is not covered by insurance. The suit, filed in Carroll County District Court Friday by A.I.D. Insurance Co. and Mutual and Grinnell Reinsurance Co., was brought against Sir Patrick's. Inc. Dennis Heuton of Glidden owned and operated the restaurant. The suit says that the insurance companies have been "informed and believe . . . that arson of the insured's (Sir Patrick's) premises . . . was caused by the acts of the defendant's agents, officers or employes and whatever rights (the) defendant had under the fire policies were thereby forfeited." Heuton's attorneys are preparing a suit against the insurance companies asking to be paid for the fire loss, according to Raymond Snook. Glidden, an attorney for Heuton. Heuton's suit is expected to be filed sometime this week. Snook said. Michael R. Mundt of Raun. Insurance, See Page 2 trials are to determine guilt or innocence, not popularity." "Never before in American history has an accused encountered such intense and continuous prejudicial publicity" as Calley did, Gordon told the court. He also argued that Calley should have been granted the right to call high Defense Department officials, including then Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird as a witness. He said their testimony was needed to rebut denials by Army officers that they had been influenced by their superiors to press charges against Calley. Clashes Reported in Peking TOKYO (AP) — Tens of thousands of angry Chinese milled through Peking's Tien An Men Square today, setting fire to three motor vehicles in protest against the removal of wreaths honoring the late Premier Chou En-lai, a resident of the Chinese capital reported by telephone. Clashes between demonstrators and police also were reported. A report published in Vienna and Budapest from the Hungarian news agency's reporter in Peking said Chou apparently has become a rallying point for the "moderates" in the Chinese Communist party and that the wreaths were removed apparently because the demonstrators, in speeches and posters, attacked Chairman Mao Tse- tung'wife. Chiang Ching. The Peking resident reached by telephone from Tokyo said there were clashes between some of the crowd and militiamen earlier in the day. Other sources reached by telephone from Hong Kong said there were a few fist fights, and no serious injuries were reported. The Peking resident contacted from Tokyo estimated the size of the crowd at 30,000, but the Peking correspondent of the Japan Broadcasting Corp. said the crowds reached 100.000 during the day. the most turbulent since the violence of the Cultural Revolution a decade ago. The informant reached from Tokyo said the crowd was still in the square at 5 p.m. and seemed restless. But he said it was orderly. The source added that the spontaneous outpouring of so many people, which he called "a very unusual thing." could be a reaction against the radical campaign against First Vice Premier Teng Hsiao-ping, the moderate Chinese, Sec Page 2 Iowa Farmers Can Handle Any Soviet Bids Prospects for Grain Exports 'Good' DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — If the Soviet Union tries again this year to tap America's grain harvest, Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Robert Lounsberry believes the nation can handle the business easily. "Now the prospects look reasonably good for continued export demand," says Lounsberry, "especially with the Soviet Union predicting 30 per cent fewer crops." The Russians are also producing more livestock, he said, and that will boost the Soviet demand for feed grain. He said the Russians "had to liquidate some livestock because they didn't have enough grain'' to feed them. But the secretary said that with predictions of increased planting this spring, farmers can handle any Russian requests for grain and not denude the nation's grain bins and drive up domestic prices. In Iowa, farmers indicate they will plant 12 million acres to corn, up 2 per cent from last year, and seven to eight million acres in soybeans, down 3 per cent from 1975. Lounsberry said that there is "a tremendous carryover" in supplies of corn and soybeans ''that the government didn't know about" because it was stored in private facilities. A considerable amount of it came into country elevators for storage just before the last embargo on grain sales to Russia, he added. Lounsberry will have a chance later this summer to check on Russian farming problems first hand. He says he will lead a delegation of at least 23 lowans to the Soviet Union as part of the international People To People program. He said the group will visit European Common Market headquarters in Brussels, then travel to The Netherlands-; Finland and, finally, Moscow. The group will visit another Russian city to be determined later by the Soviets, he said. "The idea is to exchange ideas -with different people," said Lounsberry. He explained that People To People tours are formed by trade or profession, with the participants being from the same type of work — in this case farming. "It's not a vacation or junket." said Lounsberry, "It's intended to promote good will." Although Iowa has been drenched with enough rain to alleviate the topsoil loss crisis of recent weeks, Lounsberry is not satisfied that the ground has enough moisture to see farmers through the growing season. "We are still going to need a substantial amount of rain for the subsoil," he explains. He said the critical period is during the hot, dry July and August when crops that are pollinating need plenty of moisture stored beneath the surface. Doing it the Old Way — Ed Bruch of Carroll planted oats with his team of Belgians Friday morning north of Carroll. Bruch held the reins in one hand and scooped oats into the planter with the other hand. It takes him about two and one-half hours to plant the 23 acres with his team. Cherry and Kay. A tractor -Stall Photo can't go any faster planting oats, he said. The farmer has used horses all his life. His horses are used for planting oats and hauling manure. Working and raising draft horses is a hobby, he said. He owns six horses, four Belgians and two Perchcrons.

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