Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas on October 10, 1974 · Page 4
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Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas · Page 4

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Thursday, October 10, 1974
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Page F (ARK.) SfAR Thursday, October Oakland vs. Los Angeles in World Series Dodgers pound out big win to take playoff series, 3-1 By RON ROACH AP Sports Writer LOS ANGELES (AP) - It's an All-California World Series for the first time, and Steve Garvcy said the Los Angeles Dodgers wanted it that way. "We said collectively that we want to play the best team," said Garvey, hitting star of the Dodgers' 12-1 victory over Pittsburgh Wednesday that gave Los Angeles its first National League pennant in eight years. "Oakland is the World Series champion and the American league champion again, so we have to beat them if we want to prove we are the best team in baseball." The Dodgers — behind Garvey's two home runs and two singles, and Don Sutton's masterful pitching — whipped the Pirates Wednesday, winning the series three games to one. The two-lime defending World Series champion A's eliminated Baltimore by the same margin in games for the American league crown. The A's are expected to pitch Ken Hollzman, who blanked Baltimore last Sunday, and Los Angeles will open the series with Andy Messersmith, who beat Pittsburgh Sunday, in Saturday afternoon's game at Dodger Stadium. Dodger Manager Walt Alston refused to draw a comparison between the Dodgers and A's because he hadn't studied scouting reports. "I don't know much about Oakland," he said. Alston, whose first pennant Baseball World Series at a Glance By The Associated Press Best-of-7 Series ... Saturday, Oct. 12 • ^Oakland at Los Angeles Sunday, Oct. 13 Oakland at Los Angeles Monday, Oct. 14 No game scheduled Tuesday, Oct. 15 Los Angeles at Oakland, N Wednesday, Oct. 16 Los Angeles at Oakland, N Thursday, Oct. 17 Los Angeles at Oakland, N, if necessary Friday, Oct. 18 No game scheduled Saturday, Oct. 19 Oakland at Los Angeles, if necessary Sunday, Oct. 20 Oakland at Los Angeles, if necessary Davidson says another injured JONESBORO, Ark. (AP) — Football Coach Bill Davidson of Arkansas State University said Wednesday that cornerback lister Washington had become the ninth Indian to be sidelined with, injuries. Davidson said Washington had hurt his hip. Davidson said offensive guard Bill Graff probably would fill the post normally held by the injured T. J. Humphreys on Saturday, when the Indians play Illinois State at Normal, 111., at 1:30 p.m. Davidson said he was unhappy about the Indians' 90-minute practice Wednesday. "We were not sharp or crisp at all," he said. "The longer we worked, the worse we looked. In fact, we got to looking so badn we cut practice short and omitted work on the kicking game." came in 1955 when the Brooklyn Dodgers won their first World Series, didn't even want to compare his youthful 1974 team with those of even a decade ago, when Sandy Koufax pitched the Dodgers to a World Series triumph over Minnesota, the last time Los Angeles won it all. "I'm so proud of this team with so many youngsters going so far as they have. This fella right here (Don Sutton) pitched outstanding ball for us." Sutton, however, said the Dodgers, with young players in their second or third seasons — Garvey, Ron Ccy, Dave Lopes and others — "are starting a dynasty." The 29-year-old pitcher, a rookie in 1966 when LA won its last pennant, said flatly that 1974's is the better team. The Pirates, who won the NL East title for the fourth time in the last five year, had no qualms about picking the Dodgers to win the World Series. "I pick the Dodgers," said Manager Danny Murtaugh. "I don't predict the number of games the series will go. I'll root just as hard as any Dodger fan for them in the series. It was a battle for the pennant up to now, and this is now a league vendetta." '"J'hey outhit us, outpitched us and just outplayed us, all the way around," said Pirate center fielder Al Oliver. "They deserve to go to the World Series." Hope Star Sports A's given 2-1 win by Birds to advance to World Series A comparison of the two teams Weaver blames loss on bad plate umpire By GORDON BEARD AP Sports Writer BALTIMORE (AP) — Manager Earl Weaver of Baltimore, always disconsolate in defeat, somehow managed a surprise joke after the Orioles lost the American League Championship to the Oakland A's. After blaming umpire Dave Phillips for contributing to Baltimore's 2-1 defeat on Wednesday, Weaver dropped what sounded like a true bomb. "We play 162 games to get here," Weaver said, "and then we get a bad report from our scouts." Newsmen gasped, while reaching for pencils and microphones. But it was only a mammoth curve ball, even bigger than those thrown in vain by losing pitcher Mike Cuellar, who was lifted in the fifth inning while still hurling a no-hitter — after walking four batters to force in Oakland's first run. "I was only kidding," said Weaver, who was suddenly very much out of character in such a situation. Standing just behind the circle of newsmen was Bill Werle, who had scouted the A's. Actually, not much scouting was necessary for the two foes, who have played each other for the league championship in three of the past four seasons — Oakland winning the last two years. Except for his brief attempt at humor, Weaver was very much in form while complaining that the failure by Phillips to call a third strike on three Oakland batters had ruined the day. "With the stuff Cuellar had," Weaver said, "I think he would have pitched a no-hitter if it hadn't been for Phillips. The guy wouldn't raise his right hand on close ones." One near-miss, Weaver contended, was on a 3-2 pitch to Sal Bando with two outs and none on in the fifth. Three more walks followed, and the A's had their first run. The Orioles, who won their first World Series in 1966 when BASKETBALL BOSTON - All-star center Dave Cowens of tfie Boston Celtics suffered a broken bone in his right foot Tuesday night and will be lost to the team until the end of November. TENNIS DURBAN, South Africa — Basil Reay, secretary of the Davis Cup Nations committee, warned Indian tennis officials that India would risk expulsion from Cup competition if it failed to meet South Africa in the 1974 final. Solunar Tables The schedule of Solunar Periods, as printed below, has been taken from Richard Alden Knight's SOLUNAR TABLES. Plan your days so that you will be fishing in good territory or hunting in good cover during these times, if you wish to find the best sport that each day has to offer. A.M. Date Day Major Miuor 10 Thursday 12:40 7:20 11 Friday 1:30 8:10 12 Saturday 2:20 g : oo 13 Sunday 3:10 9:45 3:40 10:15 their pitchers blanked the Los Angeles Dodgers over the final 33 innings, almost matched that futility against the A's. Baltimore had failed to score for 30 consecutive innings before Boog Powell singled home a run in the ninth inning Wednesday. During one stretch, they went 15 innings without advancing a runner beyond first base. Following Powell's run-producing single, Don Baylor came to the plate with runners on first and third. After moving into position for a possible two- out squeeze bunt on the first pitch from reliever Rollie Fingers, Baylor fanned to end the game. "There's not that much difference between our clubs," said Baltimore third baseman Brooks Robinson. "We're pretty evenly matched. I hope the A's go: out now and_beat up on the Dodgers." By DICK JOYCE AP Sports Writer Horace Greeley said something about young men seeking their fortunes in the West, and the Los Angeles Dodgers and Oakland A's did just that. But when they put the baseball championship of California and the world on the line, it'll be very evident that more than 400 miles separate these teams, their styles, and their people. Item: Charley Finley,nattily-attired and overbearing, walks into the Oakland A's dugout before game time and checks Man-*- ager Alvin Dark's lineup card. If Finley doesn't like it, he just might order a change or two. Walter O'Malley, chomping on a big cigar, sits in his private box seat, minding his own business, leaving the running of the Los Angeles Dodgers to Walter Alston, <who has had the job for 21 years — all on one- year contracts. Item: Vida Blue, the A's pitcher who's been sullen for two years because of his 1972 contract dispute with Finley, is asked if there is any joy in the game of baseball. "There's joy at payday," says the 25-year-old Blue. "Baseball is just a job." Dodger pitchers don't talk like that. Dodger players don't Jlsoun'd to cynics and Charley, act like Oakland players. They f^Finley, will heip'krt'oc'k' (fie 'A's don't have clubhouse fights like '"''off their controversial pedestal. the A's, whose superstar Reggie Jackson and young outfielder Bill North got into a brawl this year. The Dodgers are mostly young and hungry athletes — & throwback to Branch Rickey's days in Brooklyn. Their stretch- drive flop last year was blamed on immaturity. This year, the front office came up with two big needs — a power hitting outfielder and a relief ace in the persons of Jimmy Wynn and Mike Marshall — to go along with such young standouts as Garvey, Ron Cey, Bill Russell, Bill Buckner, Davey Lopes, Don Sutton and Andy Messersmith. And Saturday .at Los Angeles, for the first time since 1966, the Dodgers — Dem Bums for you oldtimers — are in the World Series. They meet the rowdy A's, a somewhat modern day Gas House Gangn reminiscent of the St. Louis Cardinals of the 1930s. The A's have been there before. They have wfn the past two World Series and are cocky and confident that the championship banner will be flying over the Oakland Coliseum again. But the Dodgers hope their all-for-one and one-for-all atti- rah-rah as it may By GORDON BEARD AP Sports Writer BALTIMORE (AP) - The Oakland A's go after their third straight World Series championship with ailing Reggie Jackson and the team's other erstwhile sluggers in a slump. But the resourceful A's manage somehow to score, and they still have magnificent pitching to use against the Los Angeles Dodgers. Both were apparent Wednesday in the 2-1 victory over the Baltimore Orioles which gave Oakland the American League pennant, three games to one. The A's scored their first run on four consecutive walks in the fifth inning and .another in the seventh on their lone hit, a double by Jackson following another of the 11 walks off Mike Cuellar and Ross Grimsley. Winning pitcher Jim "Catfish" Hunter and reliever Rollie Fingers held the Orioles to five hits, with Baltimore finally end- series opener, the Orioles scored only one more run. Through the fifth inning of the final game, they had gone 15 innings without advancing a rurtrier ing a 30-inning scoring drought beyond first base... on Boog Powell's ninth inning hit. The A's pitching is what impressed Earl Weaver, the Balti; more manager. He predicted it would enable Oakland to join the 1936-39 and the 1949-53 New York Yankees as the only teams ever to win three World Series in a row. "Pitching dominate' the playoffs," Weaver said. "But that's the way we got into it, the way they got nte it, and the way they're going to win the World Series." After banging three home runs to beat Hun,ter 6-3 in the Pirates leave quietly with their bats silent as By MIKE RUBIN AP Sports Writer LOS ANGELES (AP) - In the end the Pittsburgh Pirates went quietly. They came into the National League playoffs with the league's best batting average at .274 but Dodger pitching held them to .194 in the four games. Don Sutton, who shut out the Pirates in the series opener, allowed only Willie Stargell's home run Wednesday as the Dodgers beat the Pirates 12-1 and won the NL pennant three games to one. The Pirates, who thrived on their power during the season, mustered only three hits off Sutton and relief mainstay Mike Marshall, who pitched the final inning and ended the game striking out Richie Hebner. Sutton had seven .'strikeouts, getting Stargell swinging twice ' and Hebner two times. Charges fly over Woodman PJM. Major Minor 1:10 7:50 2:05 8:35 2:50 9:25 3:40 LITTLE ROCK (AP) — The resignation of Dave Woodman as sports director of KARK-TV to accept a similar position at KATV touched off charges Wednesday that he was "pressured" to accept the KATV position in order to obtain the job as play-by-play man for the University of Arkansas Sports Network. At KATV, Woodman will replace Bud Campbell, who died last week in an automobile accident. David Jones, president and general manager of KARK-TV, said Woodman would be in charge of handling the "entire Razorback broacast package which includes play - by - play football and basketball on radio, (Arkansas) Scouting Report and the Frank Broyles Show on televison." Broyles, the UA athletic director and head football coach, said a play-by-play announcer had not been hired by the UA. He said Woodman was his first choice for the position. He said he hoped a decision would be made by Thursday. He also said that he would work through an Arkansas Broadcasters Association advisory committee. Radio station KARN reported Wednesday that the committee had met and recommended that Bill Johnson of Conway be given the play-by-play job. The station also said Broyles had told the committee that he was 99 per cent certain that Woodman would be his choice for the job. Broyles, in an interview Tuesday night, denied making the statement. Johnson had served as Campbell's "color man" and did the play-by-play of the TCU game last Saturday night. Eric Nelson, general manager of KATV, confirmed that Woodman would be sports director and would serve as host for Broyles' show and the UA Scouting Report — a look at the Razorbacks' next opponent. Robert L. Brown, former general manager of KARK-TV and now general manager of KARK-TV's sister station in Phoenix, Ariz., brought Woodman to Little Rock more than four years ago. Brown said he had "full knowledge" that the job at KATV was presented to Woodman on an "all or nothing basis." He said this meant Woodman would have to join KATV to obtain the position with the UA Sports Network. He said the situation resulted "due to the fact that the other television station is in complete control of the athletic program at the University of Arkansas." "The only thing Channel 7 has done is hire a sports director," Nelson said. "We have nothing to do with the radio. We can't offer it because it doesn't belong to us." Brown said Woodman was contacted by Robert Doubleday, president of Leake TV, owner of KATV, Friday evening and that a second meeting was held Sunday in Doubleday's office. Brown said the meeting involved Woodman, Doubleday, Broyles and ABC sports announcer Chris Schenkel, who was in Little Rock Sunday to host the Broyles show in place of Campbell. Broyles denied that he attended such a meeting. , Concerning Brown's charge that Woodman was offered the job at KATV on an "all or nothing basis," Woodman denied the inference and said, "I think the 'package deal' (a term Brown used in a radio interview) was an assumption he made. I never used that expression in talking to him." Woodman said he and his wife decided he should join the KATV staff after he told her of the effect the new job would have on their weekends during football season. "It was a joint decision and an emotional thing," he said. "But I feel that, to best pursue my career as a sportscaster, I must take the best position available. As far as my career is concerned, I feel I will have a better opportunity with Channel 7." On succeeding Campbell, Woodman said, "I don't plan to replace Bud Campbell, but merely to succeed him. He established a goal for all of us in our profession to aim for. He had high ideals. I hope mine are as high and that I am as successful in reaching them as he was." Brown said Woodman told Jones that he was being "pressured" to ( give Doubleday an answer prior to the Broyles show on Sunday. "There is definitely a conflict of interest when a commercial televison station can run the entire broadcast sports program for the Univerity of Arkansas and the Razorbacks," Brown said. "It seems to me that something is terribly wrong." Brown charged that the hiring of Woodman was the second incident of KATV "pirating" talent developed by KARK-TV. He pointed out that Campbell worked for KARK-TV prior to taking the position with KATV. "It appears that Channel 4 is the official employment and sports talent development agency for the University of Arkansas and Channel 7," Brown said. Brown denied that his charges were "sour grapes." Broyles' show was moved from KARK-TV, an NBC affiliate, to KATV, an ABC station, several years ago. Broyles said the show was moved because NBC and CBS carried profes- sional football on Sunday and that he could not be assured that his show would be seen on what che called prime time. The hour show is seen each Sunday at 4:30 p.m. Broyles said the shows of other coaches are sometimes televised late at night or on weekdays, Broyles said he talked with Woodman about the position with the UA Sports Network before Broyles talked with Doubleday about who would replace Campbell at KATV. Broyles said he believed the jobs of play-by-play announcer and host of his show were interrelated. Broyles said profits from football broadcats via the UA Sports Network are split between the nine Southwest Conference schools. He said the UA Network lost money on basketball broadcasts. Broyles said Campbell was receiving $300 for each football game and $150 for each basketball game. Al Oliver, the No. 2 batter in the league with a .321 regular season average, was O-for-3 Wednesday-'artd managed only four hits daring the series. The somber mood of the Pirate locker room contrasted to the rowdy champagne celebration of the Dodgers. The Pirates finally clinched the NL East championship the final night of the season, coming from behind, and hoped to do the same in the playoffs after getting behind the Dodgers two games to one. Instead, Los Angeles made certain of its first league title in eight years with a 12-hit attack that included two homers by Steve Garvey. A few reporters gathered around Stargell's locker at the end of the clubhouse and could barely hear him say, "You, , can,'t say .what iy pji really think .and feel" at a time'like'this. "Its been a lon&y_ear." While Los Angeles pitching stopped the strong Pirate hitting, the No. 1 Pittsburgh pitcher became a quick victim of Dodger batters in the final game. Jerry Reuss, 16-11 during the season, allowed only one run while Los Angeles won the series opener 3-0 but Wednesday Jimmy Wynn doubled in one run off him in the first inning and Garvey slammed a two-run homer in the third. "That's the way it goes," Reuss said. "They got me but they got a lot of other guys, too." BASEBALL CINCINNATI (AP) — The coaching staff of the Cincinnati Reds will remain intact next year, President Bob Howsam announced Wednesday. Joining Manager George "Sparky" Anderson for the 1975 season will be third base coach Alex Grammas, batting coach Ted Kluszewski, first base coach George Scherger and pitching coach Larry Shepard. ANAHEIM (AP) — James M, Peters, a part owner of the California Sun of the World Football League, on Wednesday was named the team's chairman of the board and will act as chief executive officer. Larry Hatfield will continue to serve in as the Sun's presi- denL GOLF POINT CLEAR, Ala. — Defending champion Gwenn Hibbs of Long Beach, Calif, fired a 77 for a share of the first-round lead with Justine Gushing of New York in the 13th annual Senior Women's Amateur Championship, sponsored by the United States Golf Association. The A's weren't much better at the plate as they battled a Baltimore pitching staff which Oakland owner Charles 0. Finley had feared would be tough to beat. Jackson, playing the final three games as a designated hitter while hobbled with a pulled hamstring muscle in his right leg, had two hits in the four games. Oakland's other three top run-producers, all of whom knocked in 73 funs or more during the regular season, didn't fare much better. Sal Bando did have two homers among his three hits, and his first homer won the third game 1-0. Joe Rudi was limited to two hits and Gene Tenace went 0-for-ll. Ironically, it was the hitless Tenace who drew the fifth-inning walk off Cuellar which forced home the first run Wednesday. Just before the game, Manager Alvin Dark had observed: "The thing about our ball club, is that some way, some how, we're going to find a way to score." The A's, who return home today, held a victory dinner in Baltimore Wednesday night after a relatively mild clubhouse celebration. "You don't have the hoopla you had before," Jackson said of the post-game scene. "Maybe it's because we were expected to win. If we don't, we're bums." But he added: "If we win the World Series again, then we'll howl an hour or so." Sport Shorts CINCINNATI.(AP) — Horst Muhlmann, the Cincinnati Ben- gals West German placekicker, had his own idea on what it meant to beat the Washington Redskins 18-17 last Sunday. "Just shows you," said Muh- lmann, "You beat Washington and right away they sock that five per cent surtax on you." ST. LOUIS (AP) — A morning rush on tickets Wednesday brought about a sellout for Sunday's Dallas Cowboys-St. Louis Cardinals National Football league game, a Cardinals spokesman said. The sellout of 51,392 at Busch Stadium set the contest up for a first home telecast since the Cards played host to the Oakland Raiders in the early part of the 1973 season. St. Louis takes a 4-0 record into the National Conference East Division game, while Dallas is 1-3. The Cardinals' home attendance record is 50,845. EVANSTON, 111. (AP) Walter Pen-in, a former Northern Illinois basketball star, was named as assistant coach at Northwestern University Wednesday. WRESTLING HOPE'S FAIR PARK COLISEUM (Incase of cold weather, matches will be held in Exhibit Building) FRIDAY NIGHT, OCT. 11th , 8:30 P.M. MAIN EVENT COWBOY STAN HANSEN VS. SCANDORAKBAR „ FIRST BOUT TONIRUSSO VS. BOB GARCIA SEMI-FINAL EVENT CHIEF THUNDERCLOUD VS. FRANK DALTON Tickets on sale now at the 7-11 store on West Third and Washington St. in Hope. Ringside,' 2 50 ; General admission, »2°°; Children under 11, «1°°

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