Globe-Gazette from Mason City, Iowa on October 1, 1949 · Page 4
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Globe-Gazette from Mason City, Iowa · Page 4

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Mason City, Iowa
Issue Date:
Saturday, October 1, 1949
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Page 4
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Sept. 30, 1949 Mtiion Cily G!o*.-G»i»t»«, Mnon City, U. — Nursing Noblest Profession for Women" Taught in Hospital Her CAPPED AND ROBED IN WHITE—Student nurses training at Mercy hospital come from many different towns. Here they are offered a variety of training under careful supervision. Pictured at the left is Margaret Niess, • Stacyville, waking up Mavis Olson, Mason City, for duty. Next, classwork 3-Year Course Trains Girls for Future Did you ever stop to think that not just anyone can be a nurse? A nurse has to be a special kind of girl. The royal road of travel, adventure and gl?.mor all her own added to monthly pay checks averaging $200 a month for general duty beckons right into the field of nursing. And as the jobs get more exciting and different, and enjoyable, figures on the pay checks go higher and higher. She can join the army or navy, she can join the American Red Cross, or the Indian service. She can go on to hospital administration, hospital staff seryice, nursing administration, supervision, or private duty. She can work for the takes in the study of the eye chart with Student Nurse Thersa Lamm and instructor, Mrs. Ruth Cooper, explaining it to the-nurses. Since sterilization of surgical instruments is of the utmost importance in hospital work, it is one of the first things a girl is taught. The picture shows Doris Lillibridge, New Hampton, and Reta McCormick, Garner, at the huge sterilizer. Each meal is planned with special attention to the patient's need and Theresa Lamm is shown learning to prepare a model meal. The nursing course includes 6 weeks in the diet kitchen. Mrs. Marie McCIintock, supervisor of the children's department, is shown helping in the children's ward. The student nurse- assisting her is Margaret Fox, Riceville. But it is not all work and no play for the next picture shows Joanne Schnurr, New Hampton, fixing her hair as she gets ready to go out on a date, while Reta McCormick visits with her. airlines or go into foreign or missionary service. Some girls are cut out to be typists, some clerks, and some go for city careers, and some for small towns. But since a nurse is the sort of person that seems to belong to every single one even though she is no blood kin, men automatically tip their hats and women smile with respect to every nurse they meet. And what is better news yet, is that a determined girl who wants to be a nurse can save her money while she is in high school and have enough by the time she's graduated to take the full 8 years of training offered by St. Joseph Mercy hospital to girls of all faiths. Too, there are numerous scholarships available such as the ones offered by the Cancer society and the American Legion Auxiliary. Training Cost Low All it will cost her is about $400 —or about §135 a year! That includes the white uniforms and picturesque cape, her board and room, tuition, books, lab fees, as well as an activity card. In addition she gets 10 weeks vacation during those 3 years besides overnight passes and late permissions. Too, she not only is stationed here in Mason City but she starts off spending 9 months in Sioux City and during her last year spends 3 months at Dubuque. Trained For Marriage A graduate nurse is perfectly trained for marriage. She can bring to her husband and children a wisdom and understanding beyond her years. She can take care of them in illness and prevent it in many cases. In financial difficulties she can always find a position for even special duty nurses earn $10 for an 8- hour day, and should she i'ind herself alone and with the need once more of earning her living— she can support herself with ease though she has not used her profession for many years. Capped and robed in white, the A Message to Mothers i Below is an exact reprint taken from the September 19 Issue TIME MAGAZINE Little Feet, Be Careful! Most children hate being fitted with new shoes—unless they are taken to a store where they can look at their toes in an X-ray fitting machine. Then it's fun. But last week, in the New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. Charles R. Williams of the Harvard School of Public Health warned about the harm that this type of fun might cause, through over-exposure to X-rays. Typical machines in shoe stores, Dr..Williams found, deliver from five to 58 times the maximum dose considered safe by the American Standards Association and the New York City Health Department. The safe dose is two roentgens for each exposure. The safest machine examined by Williams delivered two roentgens in four seconds; the most dangerous delivered the dose in one-third of a second. Exposures range from five to 45 seconds; the one most often used is 20 seconds. Even if a single dose is brought clown within safe limits, a child is still in danger of over-exposure. Most authorities set three exposures in one day, or twelve in a year, as the maximum allowable. But on many machines there is nothing to keep a moppet from pressing the button again and again to see his wiggling toes. And if mother is hard to please, the salesman will want to give her another look. The most likely injury is to the growth of the feet, warns Dr. Louis H. Hempelmann in a companion article. A growing section of bone (the epiphysis) is much more easily damaged by X-rays than adult bone. X-rays are deliberately used to stunt the growth of one leg in a child whose other leg has been shortened by disease. Hempelmann suspects that such stunting might result from the use of X-ray shoe fitters, and go undetected for years. Also like.ly to escape rtotice are radiation burns of the skin on the customer's feet, if they do not cause immediate reddening. Nobody knows exactly how much X-ray can be given repeatedly without causing chronic skin damage. Dr. Hempelmann believes that the dangers could be controlled by regulating the use of the machines. Other doctors think that for normal feet the best shoe-fitting machine is a patient shoe clerk. No child has ever been fitted in the B & B Children's Department thru the use of an X-RAY machine. It is true that we did not know that they were injurious, but we did know that the last line of the above article was always true, we quote, "Doctors agree that the best method of fitting children's feet, is a patient shoe clerk." The B & B has always had those "patient shoe clerks/' to fit your children/ along with the fine quality footwear such clerk's must have. ce Co. 105 NO. FEDERAL professional nurse has infinite patience with the varying demands of the ill. She has tenderness and affection for the sick or injured child. But she has far more than that. She has the education, the training, the experience and the ability to give those patients the very best of care as prescribed by their physicians. She knows the many technical treatments that may save a life or relieve pain. Just what is this education the nurse has? Let's start back when a girl makes her application to Mercy hospital here in Mason City. Tuition Less Here She finds that the tuition is less than that in many of the larger schools. The requirements are few but definite. The age limit extends from 17 to 30 years and there is only room for 25 new girls each year. These are divided up into 2 classes so a girl can start in September or in February. If a high school girl knows she wants to go into some phase of nursing it is a good idea for her to slant her high school study courses along certain lines. It will make future study easier for her. An emphasis on English is recommended and all the natural sciences, social sciences, and mathematics are good subjects to take. Too, a foreign language tends to ai'd a girl when she struggles with the professional vocabulary. Study in Sioux City St. Joseph's Mercy School of Nursing here is a unit school of St. Joseph Mercy College of Nursing in Sioux City. ;The central school in Sioux City is affiliated with Briar Cliff college in Sioux City. All freshmen spend the first nine months of their course at the central school where all laboratory courses such as chemistry, microbiology, anatomy, and physiology are taught. There they get more training in social sciences — psy- cology, sociology and ethics; and pre-clinical courses in nursing arts and sciences. But it is not all work and no play for special parties, teas and entertainments are planned for the girls. Upon returning to Mason City unit they have an opportunity to put into practice some of the things they have learned. Study courses and the services are so co-ordinated that the student spends 3 months in the operating room, followed by 1 month in the emergency department where principles learned in the operating room are put into actual practice. Then follows 1 month in the diet kitchen where the nurse learns to prepare diets for special diseases, 3 months in maternity and infant care, and 3 months in caring for children. Go to Dubuque During the girl's third year she is given a 3 months' course in psychiatry at • the Mount St. Agnes Sanatorium in Dubuque, and receives psychiatric class work at this time from the Mercy School of Nursing in Dubuque. Here's an idea of what happens to a student nurse who enrolls for the three-year course here. First of all she has a comfortable and homey place to live. At St. Joseph's Mercy hospital the nurses' dormitory is adjoining the hospital. There are double rooms and each girl is allowed to pick her own roommate. Parlors are provided for entertaining friends. The hospital sees to it that fun and recreation are available for all. There are choir groups among the students, recreation committees, student meetings, class parties, and banquets for both girls and their boy friends. Too, there are wiener roasts and picnics. Hours in Wards After the nurse has met the requirements of her pre-clinical period, she receives a cap and is allowed to go into the wards and help with the care of patients under the supervision of graduate nurses and doctors. The classwork continues, but the number of hours in the wards increases throughout the remainder of the 3-ycar training until students are working the regular 8-hour day. Here in Mason City the student nurses have a 44 hour week which includes both class periods and ward work. The student nurse pssumes more responsibility with this promotion and progresses from one department to another to gain experience in every phase of nursing. These include the operating room, maternity ward, pediatrics and diet kitchen and emergency department. Some Specialize In their 3rd year, the students receive experience as head nurses and are again rotated through the departments in a refresher course. A pest-graduate course at an advanced hospital will usually complete the specialized training in an additional 6 months. Nursing education and public health nursing among others require a college degree. However, most colleges will recognize the 15 to 20 hours credited to the student nurse during her hospital studies. Two letters which she has earned are placed after her name when she passes the state board of examination. These letters, R. N. (Registered Nurse) opens the door for her anywhere in the United States and the world. What other schooling has such a choice of selection for location as this profession which has so rightfully been termed, "the noblest profession for women?" A boy between 9 and 13 years of age requires just as much food as a man, and between the ages of 14 and 19 he will require more than a man does. Responsibility to Profession Stressed Medical students are made to realize early in their training that they are entering a profession which demands a high degree of responsibility. This is not only to individuals soliciting medical care but to all members of the community.) In times of disaster, whether local or national, physicians are called on to contribute their knowledge and time for the common good. They alone have the scientific training necessary for safeguarding the health of their fellow men and for administering to their needs during periods, of incapacity. They must by a free application of their abilities con. :ribute their share toward maintaining the high standing and dignity of the profession. A doctor of medicine must be prepared to neglect even his own family for the good of mankind. The obligation extends to the doctor's wife, in whose world outside engagements are always subject to abrupt cancellation. Dr. E. C. Martin CHIROPODIST 316 First National Bank Bid?. 4 THE INTEGRITY OF YOUR DOCTOR IS UPHELD IN OSCO DRUG PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT We are pleased to work side-by-side with your Doctor in filling your prescriptions as exactly prescribed and of only finest ingredients 10 REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD BRING YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS TO OSCO 1 — Only registered pharmacists fill your prescriptions at OSCO. 2 — A complete Department within itself. Our pharmacists take extra care with each individual 3 — The largest, most complete stock of pharmaceuticals, biologicals .and chemicals in Northern Iowa. 4 — Our rapid turnover assures fresh quality drugs of the highest purity, at lowest possible prices. 5 — Electrical refrigeration to insure proper storage of biologicals, penicillin, insulin, suppositories, etc. 6—Our shelves are filled with products from world famous pharmaceutical houses noted for their research to further the advance of medical science. 7—Any physician will vouch for the reliability and integrity of our prescription service. 8—Scientific arrangement in the physical layout provides greater expediency in filling prescriptions. 9—Registered pharmacist on duty at all times to fill your prescription. 10—Courteous, efficient service from our entire personnel. SELF SERVICE EVERY DAY LOW

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