Mt. Vernon Register-News from Mt Vernon, Illinois on January 18, 1969 · Page 5
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Mt. Vernon Register-News from Mt Vernon, Illinois · Page 5

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Mt Vernon, Illinois
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Saturday, January 18, 1969
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Page 5
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SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1969 THE REGISTER-NEWS — MT. VERNON, ILLINOIS 5—A Hairdressers Install New Officers (Autenrieth's Studio) The Artistic Hairdressers and Cosmetologists Association, affiliate .42, recently Installed new officers far 1969. They are, left to right, Leona Beckmann, Centralia and Dorothy Voss, Sandoval, board members, Doloris Goree, Mt. Vernon, historian; Helen Sullivan, Salem, treasurer; Clara Dougherty, Centralia, financial secretary; Mary Clark, Nashville, recording secretary; Don Baldridge, Salem, president; and Myrna Armstrong, immediate past-president. Gertrude Thompson, Salem, vice-president, Lillian Henry, Mt. Vernon and Jean Frederking, Nashville, board members, were not present for the pictuie. Flowers' Cover Up Cigarette Burns By POLLY CRAMER DEAR POLLY — I have found an inexpensive but delightful way to cover cigarette burns on an otherwise good plastic tablecloth with a felt back. I cut flowers from a scrap of flowered contact paper and applied over the burns of an avocado green cloth. They adhered well and covered the unsightly burns so I can use the cloth.—ELIZABETH GIRLS — A few extra flowers scattered on the right spots mipht give a more "planned i'ul-way" look to the cloth, — POLLY DEAR POLLY — I find that raste wax gives my rubber tile kitchen floor the best and most lasting shine. Since I have a very large floor area, getting «kwn on my hands and knees becomes very tiring. I hope someone can tell me how to do this job without getting down on my hands and kness. —MARY DEAR POLLY — When a compact is discarded there is always some powder left around the edges. Use a pointed tool, such as a nail file, to remove the caked powder from the edges Pulverize the powder with the back of a spoon. It is sur- pr sing how much can be salvaged. If you have a lamp that is top heavy, loosely fill a plastic big with salt or sand and push it into the base of the lamp. It will really keep it from tipping. —CHRISTINE DEAR POLLY - Bonnie should use a wire brush or steel wool to remove the rust from her grate and then apply sev- er'ii coasts of black stove polish. This works like a charm. -MRS. J.D.C, DEAR POLLY — Dreading's Iriend who annoys her by wan­ ting to get together every morning for coffeee is just the type whu needs people. Make plans to iron together for a whole morning so you can talk and work. too. Best of all, invite her to your next club, P.T.A. or church meeting where she will meet new people and have more than one friend to call for coffee during the mornings. —A FRIEND You will receive a dollar if Polly uses your favorite homemaking Idea, Polly's Problem or solution to a problem. Write Poily in care of this newspaper. Have on attractive well- run luvne — and with far less ef- foit. Profit from the hundreds of tried -and-tested shortcuts in Polly's new book. To get it, send name, address with zip code, and 75 cents (in coins or check) to POLLY'S HOMEMAKING POINTERS, (name pa per), P. O. Box 495S, Chicago, 111. 60680. The Pyramid Clu b *'&• Rival By BETTY CANARY "You've won a free camera!" the post card said. But it was <j different story after I dialed the telephone number given on the card. I got the free camera if I bought a new vacuum clearer. I asked if this same company had sent the card I had received two weeks prior to the camera offer. That card said, "Firs! Notice. Call the number below before 5 p.m. with in the rext three days. " I called but norody answered. The girl said the cleaner company hadn't Font it and so far I've had nothing repossessed, so I am assuming somebody wanted to sell me aluminum siding, new asphalt topping for my driveway or some other hard-to-live with-out item. This year I have received three free vacation invitations to Florida and I wonder how my name got on their list. I vaguely remember signing coupons at the state fair last sum­ mer and possibly this is their source. Of course, I'm not going to spend my money on free • vacations in Florida and I'm net going to invest in real estate there via photographs. Actually, what I'm saving my money for is the cosmetic business. And I'm waiting to be contacted by them. This get-rich, quick scheme fanning out across the country has to be the biggest money- maker since the Pyramid Clubs. What happens is that for $2, 500 you get the opportunity to sell cosmetics. After the company has you signed up, then every other dupe (oops!, the word they use is "client") you tiring into the fold, nets you $500. Obviously, by bringing in five of your friends, you get back you initial investment and you still (lucky you) get to sell uV» cosmetics. The cosmetics you bought at "wholesale" prices, that is. Before all this happens, you ret an invitation to a "party." At the party you'll be shown a film, the star being the head of the cosmetics firm. He was just a pore ole country boy, see. and a door-to-door salesman. Well, the film tells you, aher he made his million dollars, he decided he would devote the rest of his life to making all us folks rich, too. He fcn't pore any more, he says. He spends his time just drivin' aound in his Lincoln Continental and flyin' around the country in the company plane, hel- pin' us out. ... at $2,500 a uclpin'. . . Testimonials are give by 'wealthy" members of the audience (the whole party resembles a revival meeting) all of whom, just a few weeks ago, were pore old country boys. Example: A man, "formerly a postman in Kentucky," who has made more than $50,000 in the vast six months. I'm panting to get in line and SVJXI up. I mean, I'm jus a pnre lil ole girl from the coun try and. . . Tibbs Appointed To Shrine Office A.C.E.I. Meets The Missahwa branch of American childhood Education International held it's dinner meeting at the student union, S.I.U. Carbondale, Wednesday night, January 15. Dr. Robert Russell of S.I.U. very ably discussed sex education in the elementary schools, he said the schools were the connective link between home and church in teaching sex education. Those attending the meeting from Mt. Vernon were Mrs. Aileen Jones, Patty Sickafus, Carrie Lee Randall, Betty Martin, Olva Phillips, Helen Chaney, Margaret Roderick and Miss Carolyn Nordin. -o- -o- -o- Toastmasters Meet The Mt. Vernon Toastmasters Club met at the Irvin Mac Restaurant Monday evening, January 13, with Dr. Wm. Zinzilieta presiding. The invocation was given by Bill'Mullins, treasurer. The business meeting was called to order. The following officers were elected for the ensuing six months: Carl Andres, president; Rex Fouts, Adm. vice- president; Dr. Wm. Zin­ zilieta, Ed. vice-president; Gale Howell, secretary; Bill Muffins, treasurer; and Ralph Guy ton, sergeant-at-arms. Carl Andres served as toastmaster, introducing the following' speakers and subjects: Bill Mullins, "Earthquakes" and Dr. Wfli. Grant, "An Emergency In Education." Dr. Grant was awarded the trophy for the best speech of the evening. The general evaluator was Carl Andres, assisted by Rex Fouts and John Bugal. Gale Howell served as grammarian. -o- -o- -o- Remocwen C'lul) Remocwen Club will meet Tuesday. January 21. at the L. arid' N. Oafe at 6:30 p.m. Reservations may be made by calling Sue Grigg at 2-^1-3073 Cancellations must be made by 9:00 a.m. Monday. • -o- -o- -o- Suivmiersville Unit Tiie Summersville Unit of Hi-hie Extension will meet Tuesday January 21 at 1:30 p.m. at-yjhe home of Mrs. Hazel Al- br*eht, 715 north 12th street. 4jl members are urged to attend. Visitors are welcome. -o- -o- -o- Mtjj; Vernon Evening Unit ^e Mt. Vernon Evening Unit oi yHome Extension will meet Monday, January 20 at the home of Pansy Thompson, 513 soiiih 22nd. *0 -O- -0- -o- V.tf.W. Auxiliary The V.F.W. Auxiliary of Post 1376 will meet Tuesday, Jan­ uary 21 at 7:30 p.m at the post home, 1107 Jordan. All members are urged to attend. -o- -o- -o- Belle Rive Willing Workers To Meet The Belle Rive Willing Workers will meet Thursday, January 23 at the home of Mrs. Nelson Hampton. Dinner will be served. All members are asked to bring their work. -o- -o- -o- Democrat Women's Organization To Meet The Democrat Women's Organization will meet Monday, January 20 at 7:30 p.m. in the small court room of the court house. This will be a membership and program planning meeting. Refreshments will be served ard a special award presented. -o- -o- -o- Duplicate bridge At a regular game Monday night winners were: Paul Duncan and C O'Rourke, first; Mr. arid Mrs. George Leatherman, second; and Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Morris, third. Games are played each Mon- oay night at 8:45 o'clock. All are welcome to play. -o- -o- -o- Oakdale W.S.C.S. The Oakdale W.S.C.S. met Tuesday, January 14 at the home o£ Mrs. Vivian Byars. The meeting was opened with a hymn and prayer by Mrs. Margaret Wiseley. A devotional reading was given by Mrs. Vivian Byars. The meeting was called to order and a decision to contri- Lute toward the purchase of new hymn books was voted on, also a motion to purchase reading course books. The nominating committee will be appointed at a later date. Mrs. Lillian Hunt presented ihe lesson "Missionary Out- roach" from the book "The Now Prophets." Mrs. Ida Chambliss gave a reading entitled "O Beautiful Age." Other readings were given by Mrs. Lucille Marlow, Mrs. Lillian Hunt and Mrs, Vivian Byars. Refreshments were served by the hostess. Games were played and prizes awarded. The next meeting will be held February 11 at thehome of Mrs. L:?lian Hunt. Mrs. Wilma Voyles will present the lesson. SOCIALLY YOURS By NADINE Society Editor Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Linder of Detroit, Mich., have returned to their homo after visiting with Mr. and Mrs. Bryan Britton and other relatives in their area, -o- -o- -o- Stanley Lawrence Bise, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence J Bise, Route 2, Bluford is on the Honor Roll at David Lipscomb College, Nashville, Tenn. Bise is a graduate of Webber township high school. He is beginning his junior year at Lipscomb as a pre-med major, -o- -o- -o- Miitnie Ireland will be 84 years old, January 21 and Orpha Reynolds will be 73 years old, January 22. They are residents of the Hickory Grove Manor Nursing Home. Their birthdays were reported by Mildred Van Dyke, activitiy director. . . We d p hope they will receive many other cards along with the one we are mailing today, -o- -o- -o- Mrs. Sheryl Wilderman of Bonnie returned home Wednesday from a weeks visit in Hawaii with her husband, Sp-4 Jerry Wilderman, who was on a rest and relaxation leave from duty in Vietnam. Sp-4 Wilder man has been in stationed at Dian, Vietnam, for the past six months. While in Hawaii, Sp-4 called his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Wilderman of Route 4, Mt. Vernon and his wife's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Keith Beckham of Bonnie. For friends, who wish to write, Sp-4 Wilderman's addrpss is: Sp-4 Jerry Wilde-man RA56590964, Co. B, 1st S. and T. Bat. 1st. Inf. Div. APO San Francisco, Calif. —96345 HUMOR MAKE BELIEVE Officer (to draftee during training): You idiot! You fool! Do you want to get yourself killed? Don't you realize that you are exposing yourself to an imaginary enemy 300 yards away? Draftee: Oh, it's all right, sir. I'm standing behind an imaginary rock that's 30 feet high. I won't get killed here, sir. Outer Guard Ray Tibbs, Mt. Vernon, receives the Fez of a Divan (officer) member from newly elected illustrious Potentate Harry I Bise of Ainad Temple in East St. Louis after the election Friday night. Bise, a CollinsviUe resident, and area manager for the IGA Foodliners (Wetterau Grocers) started m line in 1961 when appointed by Dave Mallett, then Potentate, and a former clerk of the Appellate Court in Mt. Vernon. Bise will head the 8,000 members of the Temple for the year of 19G9, and has announced his intentions of having a Ceremonial in Mt. Vernon late in the summer. Ray Tibbs, Mt. Vernon oil dealer, is the second member on the Divan from Mt. Vernon, the other being Oriental Guide James Carter. Filling the office of O u ter Guard culminates many years cf Shrine endeavors for Tibbs, and is a climax for one of Southern Illinois' best known Shrine rs. Ray was born about seven miles notli of Mulberry Grove, Illinois, and there attended the usual one- room country school. His high school activities later brought him to Mulberry Grove for attendance. After working with Shell Oil Company 19 years Pay moved to Mt. Vernon and started the Ray Tibbs Oil Company, and later the Ray Tibbs Implement Company. Ray has a step- son operating the Im- p.ement Company, Noble Don Fahrenholts, and they have two toys, who are the Tibbs' family cla:'m to grandchildren. Tibbs, his wife, Lorena, and daughter, Kathy live at 18 High­ land Place in Mt. Vernon. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Tibbs has served as Exalted Roler of the Elks Lodge in Mt. Vernon, being honored with a two year reign, and later was appointed District Deputy Grand Exalter Ruler of the Southern District of the Illinois Elks Association. He has served as president of the Elks Bowling Association of Illinois during the years, as well as heading up the Mt. Vernon Chamber of Commerce in 1958. Tibbs is now icrvdng as President of the Illinois Petroleum Marketers Assoc. Ray started his Masonic affiliations when he joined Mt. Vernon Lodge No. 31, A. F. and A. M. He has since joined the Patlon Commandery in that City. He also holds membership in the Scottish Rite Bodies located in East St. Louis, and has served as Area No. 10 Membership Chairman for a number of years for that group. Last June he was awarded the Meri- torius Service Award for his past work. Outer Guard Tibbs has served Ainad as a member of the D ; rector's Staff, greeters chairman and many special chores. Ha served as director general for two outstate Ceremonials, Mf. Vernon in 1964 with Ainad's largest Hot Sands Class, 116 in number; and Carmi in 1964, where 76 candidates became members of Ainad. For this Wf'rk he was given the Imperial Potentate's Citation Award. Tibbs has been a member of Court 86 Ro""' Order of Jesters for many years. Dear Abby. Guilty Feelings Not Necessary Abigail Van Huron Insist on Ruffles Ruffles are playing the romarv- tic role in women's wear today. They are lovely on fresh, crisp blouses and around throat and writsts on a plain dress. Also irresistibly sweet peeking out of hems of little girls' dresses^ * DEAR ABBY: My three children and I drove 150 miles for a visit to my hometown recently. (My husband couldn't go. He was working.) We stayed with my parents, but I contacted my in- laws so we could make plans to see them, too. I think my in-laws are unreasonable. Let me explain: I married a widower with two small children. We now have a third child, also. Since these in-laws cared for the two children of my husband's former marriage until we wed, they figure my husband and I owe them something. Of course, we do, But how much? They demanded that I drop off the two older children to visit them, and when I left town I could pick them up. They don't care to see me, or my other child. I flatly refused', saying we would all come to see them, but no, they didn't want us. My mother-in-law even refused to talk to me. I don't know what I have done except to: try to give the children a home with a mother and father instead of grandparents. They seeni to resent me for this. Since they didn't want all my children, I refused to let them have the two older ones. Was I wrong? I invited them to my home anytime to visit the little ones, but they refused. I'd like your views. BEWILDERED DEAR BEWILDERED: If you invited your in-laws to visit thfl children, you have no reason to feel guilty. Your husband should tell his parents that showing such obvious favoritism to his two older children creates problems that he and his family will have to live with, so to please be more reasonable. DEAR ABBY: Medical science has sure given folks a lot of excuses for their shortcomings. We don't have any more drunks, tyrants, or ill-tempered and 1 unreasonable people a n ymore. They are all "sick." Same goes for liars. I know a woman who would rather lie than tell the truth, and do you know what? I am told to have "compassion" for her because she's "sick." So now, lying is a disease, too! I would sure appreciate your comments on this. CICERO DEAR CICERO: People lie because they feel insecure, inade; quate and inferior. It takes a truly helathy- minded courageous,, person to tell the truth, no matter how "bad" it makes him appear. So since lying is a symptom of a character de­ ficiency, perhaps your friend IS "sick." DEAR ABBY: I am a 52- year- old 1 widow who will soon marry Paul, a very nice 55- year-old widower. Here is my problem: First let me explain that while dating I never wore the rings I got from my do- ceased husband because I didn't want to inhibit any man who might have an interest in me. Paul and I didn't have an "official engagement," and certainly nothing was ever mentioned about a ring, but he "surprised" me with a lovely little diamond, and I do mean "little." Abby, my first diamond is nearly three times the size of this one. (I had intended resetting it to wear after I married.) Now what shall I do? I hate to hurt Paul, but if I wear a diamond, I'd prefer wearing the larger one. PERPLEXED DEAR PERPLEXED: Reset the larger diamond and wear it on your right hand. But wear Paul's ring on your "engagement" finger. Veronica's Views By Veronica Voss Some days of mid-winter have no color at all, except greys, varying from light to dark. This January 16th was just such a day. The grass colorless with a sad and sodden appearance. The trees, wot black branches etching themselves against the grey sky, lend the only stark contrast to the scene. Maybe we will appreciate Spring even more. . . and if this is possible, winter has served its purpose well. -o- -o- -o- During the time tine "Peace People" were haggling over the shape of the table in Pans, I had early suggested a round one . . . revolving constantly, in this way showing no partiality to any of the delegates. They have solved this as of today, by having no name plates on the table and using the round one. I imagine a new problem will arise before they get seated. But with fkigers crossed and tongue in cheek, let us hope they get down to business, -o- -o- -o- A real life story, sounding almost like fiction, happened recently to' a young Navy man — Gunner's Mate Bcrnie Minton. Home on leave this winter, he was introduced to a Mrs. Wong from Hong Kong. She was visiting this country to sec her new grandchild. Bernie knew his tour of duty would take him to Hong Kong, so they exchanged addresses. In a communique this week he reported to his folks mat he had been a guest in the Wong home. They are manufacturers of motorcylce helmets, for Sears Roebuck. Small world, isn't it? -o- -o- -o- I know another young fellow counting the days now. He will leave Viet Nam very soon, and warned us we would have a visitor. We will be watching our doorstep, Rick, and the Welcome mat is out. . . I'm glad you have enjoyed my "Sunrise" and "Sunset" Views ... I have more time to study them than do Marines oh duty in Southeast Asia, -o- -o- -o"Living in the past has one tiling in its favor. . . it's cheaper." (Grit) Personals Ron Sears of Centralia was a business visitor in Mt. Vernon Friday. Edna Austin of Texico shopped in the King City yesterday. Wendell Rice of Herrin transacted business in Mt. Vernon ^Yiday. Alex Gross of Scheller visited the King City yesterday. J. D. Vandernerr of Grayville was a business visitor in Mt. Vernon Frdiay. Bob Gilespie of Bluford, visited Mt. Vernon Friday JANSFN'S SELF SERVICE LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING 10% Off ON ALL DRY CLEANING ORDERS LARGE OR SMALL -SPECIALS- These 3 Days Only Mon., Tues., Wed., Jan. 20, 21, 22 Pick Up or Leave 7 A.M. to 11 P.M WE NOW HAVE FACILITIES FOR CLEANING PLASTIC AND VINYL SUEDE COATS 1 60 MINUTE SERVICE 8:00 A.M. to 5 P.MTJ FREE Parking on Side of Building Jim lunsen. Owner 318 South 10th — Open 6 A.M. to Midnight Daily Attendants On Duty At All Times.

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