The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on June 10, 1968 · Page 10
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June 10, 1968

The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 10

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Monday, June 10, 1968
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Page 10
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eei — bu max fturm — Ed Tillman, Hayti grain elevator owner - operator, expects the Bootheel's wheat harvest to start about June 13 or **n Wheat is the Bootheel's spring time cash crop — a source of agricultural income that we didn't have a number of years ago, when very Jittle wheat was grown in the area. •Tillman estimates that only around 55 or 60 per cent of the wheat acreage allotment wound op planted. The trouble was the weather last fall at wheat plant- kg time. With good breaks in flie'weather, a farmer can get wops of beans and wheat from the same acreage each year. However, last year they didn't get a good break in the weather. This year, the price the farmers will receive for their wheat is down from around 25 cents to 30 cents a bushel as compared with last year's prices. Then the army worms attacked the crop in force this year, calling for the added expense of applying an insecticide. It appears, however, that pre - acre production will be good — an educated guess-tim- ate being 35 bushels. There has jb^en some addi- Astrological * Forecast * By 6AA1KK& BJGHTEH- f oiMMt, ___ ,... your Sirth datt, TUESDAY GENERAL TENDENCIES: The daytime finds you able to Samite whatever has to do with getting your life on a more solid and secure structure and especially are you able to get rTd^of whatever is standing in the way of your progress and your development in the world of outside activity. The evening finds you under fine aspects for Discussions. ; ARIES (Mar. 21 to Apr. 19) Out -to see that bigwig who has the wherewithal to help you with career matters, and come right out with what it is you have in mind. Then show your finest talents with right, progressive people. Your advancement depends on you. , TAURUS (Apr. 20 to May 20) You've found it difficult to get certain benefits before, but now fhye are within easy grasp. However, don't be so narrow- minded. Listen to what partners have to suggest without being so conceited. GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Do you know exactly what it is that higher-ups expect you to do, and are you being as precise, as is necessary? Then sit down with mate and talk over how you really can communicate. Show more affection. MOON CHILDREN (June 22 to July 21) Showing others you are cooperative with associates imakes a big hit with officials. Even better ratings and arrangements are possible for the future. Then out for that chummy dinner together. Have fun. LEO (July 22 to Aug. 21) Stop fooling around and get busy with all those duties ahead of you. Co-workers are in a fine mood for a change and give you. a big lift. Take time to do something about your health, 'and be more careful about baggy trousers. VIRGO (Aug. 22 to Sept. 22) Don't be lax about taking advantages of an opportunity for recreation that presents itself show that you are on the alert. Mate is really up in your strata of thought in P.M. Show that you have grace, vim. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Ideal day to do something about those conditions around the house that are not to your liking. Take care you do not literally bark at one at home who is not feeling well. Show concern instead. "' SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You have to find some better way of operating at home and in business if you want to be happier, have more do-re-me. A little more dynamic action on your part is good where friends are concerned, too. Don't be a doormat. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to tional activity hi the matter of introducing susar beets as an important Bootheel crop, according to Duane Michie, executive vice - president of the Bank of Hayti . Some top officials of the Great Western Sugar Manufacturing Company of Denver, Colo., were in the area recently taking another look around and showing new interest in the Bootheel as a location for a new beet sugar refinery. They seemed to like what they saw, and on this trip what they saw were five -acre -plots of sugar beets growing in Pemiscot, Dunklin and New Madrid counties. The University .of Missouri Delta Center at Portag«vlBe also has a test plot growing. Several years ago a number of farmers in the .lower Boot- heel produced » sizeable sugar beet crop, which was processed at Hayti and then shipped by rail to Great Western's refinery in Colorado. It was proven then that the beets could be successfully grown in this region — but still nothing further happened in the program. In the first place, a refinery located in the Bootheel would cost around $20 million, Michie said, and from 25,000 to 30,000 acres of beets would have to be produced in the region to support it. When this thing was being discussed several yeaw ago, the information was that a federal beet acreage allotment could not be acquired for the Bootheel, but Michie says that isn't involved at this time. The Great Western officials also were impressed with the Bootheel farmers' willingness to invest sizeable sums of money in large pieces of agricultural equipment. If they went into large scale beet production on a permanent basis, the purchase of special pieces of equipment used in beets would be necessary, and these large tools don't come cheap. Anyway, don't count the Boot- heel out yet as a future major producer of sugar beets. The way the cotton production has been going the last two years, plus what has happened to the crop so far this year, may have conditioned a number of farmers to want to try something else — maybe sugar beets. Last year, the largest single tract of land in the United States planted with okra was located in Pemiscot County a few miles south of Hayti. This was a project by the Bootheel Agricultural Services, Inc., an anti - poverty cooperative which now has 47 member families in Pemiscot and New Madrid counties. The tract ef more than 100 acres produced a bumper crop of okra, some 100.000 pounds jf which were harvested and sold. But being the largest field of the vegetable in the U. S. was where the co-op ran into.trou- ble. It was just too large to be handled successfully in view of the fact that when okra is ready for harvest, all of it is ready, /and U has to be done quickly if it is to sell. . Learning from this situation, the co-op this year has scattered their fields of okra something like this: around 35 acres on the Kersey farm south of Hayti, 15 acres in the Bragg City area, and 13 acres in the Howardsvlne area. Also at How ardsviUe they will have some 21 acres in cucumbers this year. This system will place the crops nearer the labor supply needed; at harvest time, so they anticipate a more successful op eration this year. Leroy Jones of Hayti, is president of the co-op, and Mrs. Robbie Townes Hayti, is secretary. This group is showing how two more agricultural products can be profitably grown in Southeast Missouri. And while we are on this subject, we have reports from Mississippi County that there is another good acreage of sweet corn raised again this year in the Spillway. HcNzntht Synocat* am, Dec. 21) You've got to be care-1 ful with your money or you ' could spend it much faster than it comes in, and that's when yow really get into trouble. Listen to what that buddy partner has to suggest. You can make more money that way. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) Step out to the social affairs that really appeal to you and have a delightful time — forget the old fogies. A little time spent at beauty shop first is good. A good massage could od wonders for you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) Sit down for awhile and decide just what it is you want to accomplish in the days ahead and then put the wheels rolling in the right direction. Run out and help that pal in distress. Be kind. PISCES (Feb. 20 to Mar. 20) If you have a nice talk with higher-ups you have known for a long time, you find they give you the know-how you need for bigger success. If you get out socially, make sure the people you see are serious. The other type could get you in real trouble. IF YOUR CHILD IS BORN TODAY ... he, or she, will be one of those naturally practical young people and have much ability at selling, both of which attributes can lead to real success. Teach early to study theory very thoroughly so that the most can be accomplished during the lifetime. Much organizational ability here. A field of business fine here. WARNING ORDER In the Chancery Court, Chickasawba District, Mississippi County, Arkansas. Patsy Lucille Wiseman, Plaintiff, vs. No. 17658 Billy Jean Wiseman, Defendant. The defendant, Billy Jean Wiseman is hereby warned to appear within thirty days in the court named in the caption hereof and answer the complaint of the plaintiff, Patsy Lucille Wiseman. Dated this 7th day of June, 1968 at 10:30 o'clock A.M. GERALDINE LISTON, Clerk By Opal Doyle, D. C. Bruce Ivy, Attorney James M. Gardner, Ally. Ad Litem. 6-10, 17, 24, 7-1 Quick Quiz Q — What is unique about Istanbul's famous Blue Mosque? A - The Blue Mosque - its name is the Mosque of Sultan Ahmet I — is said to be the only mosque in the world adorned with six minarets. ANTIQUE AUCTION June 12, 1968 10:30 a.m. SMITH 'AUCTION* — "Cotton woVd 'Comer 4 miles west of Osceola, Arkansas on Highway 140 and Interstate 55 across from Osceola Speed* way. Lots of good furniture, Crystal Glass, Brass Chandeliers, Piano Stools, Dinner Bell, China Cabinets, Beds, Round Top Trunks, Lots of other merchandise too numerous to mention. Melvin Smith Owner Tcrmt of Sole - Cosh Auction Evtry Sat Night—8 p.m. & Sunday—1 p.m. Decton Perma-Iron i* Eslyester, 35% cotto^ Sussex B.D., $6.00 Decton Perma-Iron Oxford 65% Dacron* polyester, 35% cotto* Sussex B.D., SS.OO Decton Perma-Iron (65% Dacron* polj|ester,^5% cotton Embroidered, $5.00 Nassau Ban-Lon* Perma-Iron 100% TexturizedJ3uPont nylon Mock Turtle, $7.00 Mr. Golf Perma-Iron S0% Dacron,* 50% cotton I6.N From Arrow, WV V L . e white shirt company Bright Ideas for Father's Day Come see our complete selection of I gifts for Dads of all sizes and ages. Dress shirts with his favorite collar styles in today's new colors, stripes and tattersall checks. Sport shirts for his leisure hours in solid colors... and handsomely embroidered. Sport knit shirts in a wide variety of sporting colors for active competition or just casual weekend living. Decton Perma-Iron 65% Dacron* polyester, 35% cotton King Cotton Perma-Iron 100% cotton Nassau Ban-Lon* Perma-Iron, 100% TexturizedpuPontnyloai Sport Knit, 57.00 Decton Perma-Iron Batiste 65% Dacron* polyester, 35% cotton Glen Collar, SS.Oe Decton Perma-Iron Oxford €5% Dacron' polyester; 35% cotton Sussex B.D., Dectolene Perma-Iron 100%'Dacron* pollster ' Shop By Phone CallP02-2721 otnpanii fin* Appanl For M»n and Bays Mote* Day Decton Perms-Iron Oxford 152 Dacron* polyester, 35% cottov Xatterull Cheekf, K.OO Free Mall Wrapping

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