Covina Argus from Covina, California on August 7, 1909 · Page 3
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Covina Argus from Covina, California · Page 3

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Covina, California
Issue Date:
Saturday, August 7, 1909
Page:
Page 3
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1 1 r" 11 MILLER ALLOWS ONE HIT. Speedy Twirlsr for San Felice Nine Scores Shutout against Racycle Team in Slugging Match. Standing Interurban League. Club— Won Lost Pet. Covirm San Felice 3 0 1.000 Palms 3 0 1.000 Wells-Fargo 2 1 .666 Parafflnes 2 1 .666 Eastern Outfitters 1 2 .333 Directories 1 2 .333 Racyclea 0 3 .000 Colegrove 0 3 .000 There were just seventeen hits in last Sunday's ball game, and when you say that the Racycles got a small single in the sixth, it is not hard to guess •who got the other sixteen. There •were two prominent features in the game, Miller's high class slab work and the punishment meted out to Clark by the deadliest slugging aggregation of the Suburban League. It •was an interesting game for the spectators, for aside from the long pokes to the outer garden, there were times when Miller had to retire the batters by the air route to prevent the visitors from chalking in the run column. Three times men were perched qn second and third, and the chance for any kind of a swat to score, but Covina's premier twirler, supported by Chess in the backstop position, warded oft" the dange'r each time. Second baseman Graf won a warm piace in the hearts of the fans by his snappy work in the infield. In the second inning DuPrep lined a hard •one to second that looked good for a hit in any company, but the speedy college man ran and scooped the pill out of the dirt, and whirling clean around to catch his balance, slammed it to first in time to catch the runner. Another circus stunt was pulled off in the same inning when Spider Middaugh misjudged a slow liner at first. Graf raced out of his territory, and completed the play by throwing the runner out at first.. In the very first inning the locals showed how they stood politically by consolidating on Clark for three nice singles, &r.# a pass to first. Clark •was advertised as the man that had something on Miller. Maybe he had, but nobody noticed it. Clark ia a good-natured boy, but his horse shoes failed him, and he had nothing that the orange pickers had not known about before. Aguayo started right by singling, (stealing second and ad vancing third on Monte's bounce over the box that counted as an infield hit. Shutt hit a sizzler past second, scorj ing both men on the paths. Middaugh received an ovation as he stepped to the plate, and the fans called for a reputation of the three-base stick work of the previous week. The famous grin was too much for Clark, so the lanky youngster walked. Another run was added when Shutt came home after the second baseman muffed Miller's grounder to the infield. The second Inning was all for Graf. Tho first putout was made when N. Alexander tried to beat out Chess's good right whip. Then the second sacker's two great assists that caught the runner at first. In the second half of the same frame the locals added a pair of runs with the aid of Shutt's three-bagger. The rest of the runs were scattered along in groups of ones and twos, except for blanks in the third and fifth. After that the home team got the idea that it would be a great chance to fatten up batting averages, so Clark was touched up for all kinds of extra swats. Wilson •wont into right field in the sixth and in his two times at bat slammed out a single and a triple. Miller made the longest hit of the day, far out over left field. Four hits were made in the seventh, although none of them were great drives, they counted as run getters. Spider was safe on Urog- dan's error, Miller wont first on a fielder's choice that forced Spider. Wilson and Chess singled, then Shirley 1'it. scoring Miller and Wilson. Miller scored and Shirley went, to third \\heti Clark tried to knock the errand stand down with the. ball. Pete drew a nice single, scoring Shirley. 'The wily outfielder purloined the next two sacks but failed to score as Hughes made tin; next out. The score: KACYCI.KS AH H If SI! I'O A H .If -I i) \i 1 0 0 1 COVINA AB R H SB PO A E Aguayo, If 5 2 3 4 0 0 1 Montague, cf... 421 1000 Shutt, 3b 3 1 2 0 0 0 0 Graf, 2b 5 1 2 1 I 3 0 Middaugh. 1i .. 3 0 I 0 1 0 2 Miller, p 5 2 1 1 2 1 0 Merwin, rf 2. 0 0 0 0 0 0 Cheshire, c 4 1 1 014 r. 0 Shirley, ss 4 3 .'! 0 0 1 2 Wilson, rf 2 1 2 0 1 0 0 Hughes 3b 2 0 0 0 I 0 0 Totals 39 13 16 r, 26 10 f. SCORE BY INNINGS, Recycles 00000000 0—- 0 Base liitH .. 0000001 0 0— 1 Covina 32010142 *—13 Base hits ... 3 2 1 2 1 I 4 2 *—16 SUMMARY Three base hits— Miller, Wilson, Two-base hit—Shirley. Sacrifice hits —Aguayo, Cheshire. Left on bases— balls—Off Miller, 3; off Clark, 4. Struck out—By Miller, 15; by Clark, ii; Wild pitches—Miller, Clark. Time —1:43. Umpire—Libby. JACKSON Motor Cars Four Models and Pour Reasons Why They are Better. The Jackson Automobile Company has a motto reading,"Sound Business Methods and Sound Goods." Material in making is best to be obtained in America and Europe. We warrant all machines for 90 days after shipment. Covina Agents STANTON & HARNISH Citrus Avenue "No Sand Too Deep, No Hill Too Steep." Christopher's Cream Of Quality THE GREATEST SELLER OF ANY AMERICAN ICE CREAM No other cream is so satisfying, so smooth, so delicious. No other cream is so universal ly popular. No other "just as good" cream can be sold at our prices. Try it. C, F, CLAPP SOLE AGENT COVINA FINE SHOK REPAIRING AT REASONABLE PRICES Citrus Avenue NOTICE TO CREDITORS. IX THK Sri'KHIOK COfitT OK TIIK BTATK OK OAUKOKNIA, IN A XI) FOR THK COCNTY OK I,OS AXOKLKS. THE GREAT PHARAOH. H0remh«b Did Mora For Egypt, Per* haps, Than Any Other. Horomheb at the time- of his accession was forty-five years of ago, full of energy nnil vigor and passlonntoly anxious to ht\vt> n free hand In the carrying out of his schemes for the reorganization of tho government. It WIVB therefore with joy that tu about th» yeur 1330 B. C. he sailed up to Thei>e-< In order to claim (lie crown. Had ho lived longer lie ml.ulit liavr been famous us ft conqueror us well MS un administrator. Ihouirli old n.iri> mis.;!it retard and ttroii hones refuse th»lv office. As It Is, however, his mime i« written sufficiently lur^e In NIC ImoU of the world's grenl men, ;mtl when he died, about l.'il.~> H. C.. jif'ler ;i reliyn of some thirty-five yeurs. he Mad done more for Kirypt tluin lutd almost niiy other phurnoh. He found the country in the wildest disorder, anil lie IvM't it the master of Itself and ready to become onco more the master of the empire which Akhnnlon's doctrine of poncp and good will lind lost. Under his <llrt>ctloii the put-god worship of tho old gods, which for him meant only tho nmliiU>tuiure of sometime proved customs, hiul gained the mastery over the chimerical worship of Afon. Without force or violence In- substituted the pracllcnl for (he vision nry, and to Arnun and order his gnife- f\il subjects wore able to cry. "The sun of him who know thoo not has set, but ho who knows (hoc shines; tho sanctuary of hfiu who assailed (boo i.; overwhelmed In <!arknoH.>i. Inil the whole onrth Is now In ll;-;hl."— Arthur 15. P. Welgnll in Century. BELLS OF THE BASTILLE. They Are Hung In a Littla Rustic Building In Paris. Tho bolls of tho r.nslilio arc still In PnriH in u little court In Avomit> cl'Iiy- Ian, vvlicro they uro IUIM^ hi >i Illtlo rustic building. There 1* no dc.uht us to their authenticity. 'Ilicy curry In rollpf their story. "These Hirer' bells were made by LouiN Cheron, founder to the court, for the royal RiiHtlllo In the year 1701." Klours-de 11s, <TOHSCH and sacred figures ndnrn the legend. The bells formerly wore part of the clock Installed by M. Sartliio In 1704. In the archives de 1'nrscnnl are all the documents relative to the work. On July 14, 1789, the balls of the assailants stopped the clock of the Bastille at a quarter past 5 In the evening. Palloy, who dernollBhed the prison, three days later received the order to deliver the clock to tho commander of the Paris militia, who transported It no one knows whlthor. After the revolution the bdls were found at tho foundries of Itoullly-sur-Andelle, ,hj Rure, where, under the reign of terror, the church bells w«re converted Into money. The proprietor of the foundry was interested in these relics and did not melt them. lie Installed the three bells in his works with the movement of the clock. By this time the dial plnte had disappeared and the figures which belonged to It. Some years ago the bells were transferred from the Roullly foundry to I'nrls, and there they have since rpirnlned.—Lon- don Globe. The French Academy. The French academy IK one of the five academies and the most, eminent constituting the Institute of Krance. It was founded in 1035 by Cardinal Ulch- elteu and reorganised In 18H1. It Is composed of forty members, the new member elected by the remaining thirty-nine members for life after personal application and the submission of the nomination to the head of the state. It meets twice weekly and is "the highest authority on everything pertaining to the niceties of the Krcru-h language—to grammar, rhetoric ami poetry and the publication of the French classics." The chief oflleer Is the secretary, who has a life tenure of his position. A chnlr In the academy Is the highest, ambition of a-osl literary Frenchmen. fVa.ni> It) J'ivy, r . A I •x.-in.l.-i . Chirk M . I';., ik ;. Kstate t;f liavid 10. I.yon, decease.!). Notice is hereby i-'lveii by the under- sit'in'il administrator of tl.'i: e.sf:ite of !>avid K. I.yon, deceased, to the creditors of and all person H having claims against said deceased, to exhibit, the same wilh the nece.-isa/y vouchers within four months after the fir.-it publication of this notice, to the said administrator of the above-named enfate at. the law office of A. M. I't-iice. rooms 7 aiid 8. Heed buiMm(/. Covina. Coun. ty of Los Angeles. Stai'i of California, v, liirh liiii.fi: i.-i her'-by desiccated as , the ))!;>!•»• (if l;ii.,ijie ; ,s of said e.-.fate. I>:i1'-;l this St./, day of .|M!V l'.i'i'>. K. P. WAIt.VK/C. Administrator for afoie..a:.j . -.t.i'e. A. M. i't-tice, attorney. FIJ-U pubiica'.ioti, .July }•> ] :>/.). v 7 Why Men's Hats Have a Dow. A bo'.v IH ulwovH to be. foun I on tin? loft Hide of a HIIID'H hat. This In n HUT vivnl of the old dnyH when hutn were costly iirticles. In order to provide HKulnsl the hut being blown owny In stormy weather u cord or ribbon WUH fastened around the ero\vn, v-Hli cmlf hunting HO (hut (hey could he f iHtened I') part of the iilllre or ci.'ihl be grasped by the hand. The ends fell on the left Hide, of course, as the left hand !-; more often dlx-iigaxed than ! the rii_:lil. U'lien not rei|>i!red II wii.-t I ii.>nal for Ihe cmlx to be lied in » bow The bow hcejiine .smaller (mil Kr.ialler, | bill it -fill remains and |-( |||:P|>, |o di, | so ;n lonj; as tiir-n wear ha In. I Transparent Rhubarb. To In- innile day bcl'or • i/xiiiy. Cut rhubarb Into jiiei-e..--, oiie Inilf Inch IOJIK .Spread on plates and Kprinl.li- with Hinjar, allowing one-half i-upful <>f Mut'af to each cupful of fruit. (.,•( all stand overnl^lil. In ((»•• morning pour off (he Juice and boll for ten inlpiiti -i, i!r>,p hi the rhubarb, n Hinall portion at a time, and i-o(,k until tender |{e inovi- from the sirup i\* KOOI, HH (Joee to //ri--erve shape. I'm j,, a j.u-tly rti.^h. C)i|c;i^o /Jccord Hcr.'ild. U n d e r//e i'. h t. I'.io'.vii Tli;i' roal dealer '/f ours got i'i-1 \\ h:it \v;i,-> i 1,11,11 •-' io iihii ToMli I! •','.''; !',i->iv, u \].,iii^d n j'ir) iln- i tli >•;• da v, think! ;- !!, i( !,(• v/a-i -jetiliig 1 r : j" ii.'ids and t/'.i <,\ 'y ',,'*, >t [.o')l.-» GOING EAST ? Phone and have our Agent call and tell you all about the Low Rates FOR ROUND-TRIP TICKETS EAST : : : IN EFFECT : : : August 9, 10, 11, 12, 13; Sept. 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15 Here are some of the Rates: OMAHA, KANSAS CITY, CHICAGO, $60.00 ST. LOUIS, 60.00 NEW YORK, 72.50 WASHINGTON, $ 67.50 108.50 107.50 Tickets Good for Stop-overs. Return Limit, Oct. 31, 1909. Choice of Routes. SOUTHERN PACIFIC Phone 144 D. B, SCHENCK, Agent, Covina LOS ANGELES OFFICE, 600 SOUTH SPRING ST. Us FOR HARNESS, HORSE GOODS, WAGONS, BUGGIES AND IMPLE- MENTS. Best Goods—Lowest Prices Oovina Harness & Saddlery Co. Phone Home 1170 PASO ROBLES HOT SPRINGS On Ihe Coast Line. The equal of any in the world and set in the midst of such climatic conditions as constantly invite to the open air. A delightful place for rest,j,recuperatton, constitutional treatments .ind recreation. The new bath house, with its superb equipment, is unrivaled by anything in this country. Hy- dropathic treatments, mud baths, swimming baths, Turkish baths. Particulars at SOUTHERN PACIFIC OFFICES. A BUYER WE CAN FIND YOU • # # * * * * # # # # * # # # For Orange Groves Alfalfa Lands or City Property List your property with us. * *- * * * #########*«*##*** Covina Realty Co. Jshnssn & INigg BLACKSMITHS Blacksmithing af all Kinds Our Specialty Shop on Citrus Ave WANTED FROM OWNERS Orange Groves House Moving McCRARY HROS. are [H-eparcd to make contracts to move building's of every description, heavy machinery and lire moving with promptness ;*id despatclu We have the experience of years in the business and guarantee our work. McCrary Bros. ARGUS BLOCK Phoue 5008 Coviaa, Cal. I R WILSON The Blacksmith With the most skillful mechanics and the best equipment we can do your work in the most workmanlike and best manner in ahortei time and at a reasonable coat to you. also carry a line of Farm Implements, Wagons, Etc, and if you are thinking of purcliasin^ a vehicle 01 any kind we in vite you to call and look over our line and talk the matter over. We will guarantee you a square deal and save you a few dollars besides ^»**^t**»**»#*»lJ»»^»*'V^^*MjM^<^^**^*MJ^ We Can Furnish Complete Either a COTTAGE AND Large Ranches i I advertise all over the world, and ! can sell your property. Address I JOHN THOMAS j 210 Byrne Building, Los Angeles.; !•' .):;' V. :.'.;. i;."i >•!>'.-i>'.. 1 i f i or a MANSION Prices within the reach of all. Phone 116 Covina Furniture Company

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