The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas on May 24, 1998 · Page 6
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The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas · Page 6

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Salina, Kansas
Issue Date:
Sunday, May 24, 1998
Page:
Page 6
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'AS SUNDAY. MAY 24, 1998 GREAT PLAINS THE SALINA JOURNAL Class / Students' paths to diverge FROM PAGE AS •t. '^, _j . - •• The two were married April 12 in an outdoor service conducted by her father, a preacher for the Reformed Baptist Church. Her parents are Ron and Marilyn Red- Sing. v *Lean was eager to be through ,with school because with her , Homework, a job and her hus- ' band's work schedule, they -weren't able to spend a lot of time together. Her married status attracted some attention at school. . , . "So long Mrs. Imel," an underclassman called as Lean left after .cleaning out her locker. -I .'She plans to wait a year before college and is thinking about belt qcoming an elementary teacher. ' ^,* Lean already won the bet on * Jwho would be the first to get mar*, . ; rjed. But none of her classmates 1- ;were willing to venture who'd be WHO GIVES A HOOT ABOUT YOUR COMPUTER NEEDS? THE COMPUTER SHOP Check out our prices . Pentium Computers starting at $999 • Complete Pentium 11 Computers starting at $1,394 Inc. "Where Service and Technology come first" 785-452-9263 655 E. Crawford, Salina Located between Mowery Clinic and Elmore Center Hours M-F 10-6, Sat 10-5 "We had our triumphs and our downfalls." James Bengtson Emmanuel school graduate .-'!. : J 5 Four of the seniors said they J -Couldn't be surprised if they were *-^engaged within five years — * : Mark Larson, Krista Wearing, James Bengtson and Christina Jaster. That didn't come as much of a shock to the rest of the class. You see, James and Christina have ' been dating off and on since their sophomore year. : And Mark and Krista? "They say they're just friends, but they do everything together like people who are dating," a classmate said. : Maybe they were just trying to avoid the cliche stereotypes. After all, Mark was the football team's quarterback, and Krista was homecoming queen. A bit warm for a bonfire Nothing has quite the charm of a high school homecoming, even if it's on the church parking lot before a school bus decorated with white and blue crepe paper as a backdrop. Three chairs were set up on a stand next to the bus, and rows of chairs were put out in the parking lot for the audience. School officials maintained the vote of the student body was a three-way tie for the candidates — Krista, Christina and Stephanie Bednar, who moved away later in .the school year. Teachers had to f vote to break the tie. * Krista, the daughter of Gary "• an'd Lorrie Wearing, was crowned the winner. • - -.Mark, as the queen's escort and . quarterback, had the job of lighting the bonfire. It was slow to ; start, but eventually took off with - flames jumping high into the air ''i, and sparks flying in the warm, ; brisk October wind. Firefighters who were on hand eventually ex; tmguished the flames. ': ; • Krista, a frequent.soloist for the i school, sang the national anthem fpr the homecoming game and was featured in solos and songs at [ graduation. need you. I want you. I love r presence," Krista sang with three other junior and senior IgjLrls during a recent worship ser*vice. "Fill us up, Lord." .„ j\s she sang, she raised her 3^nd, with fingers outstretched as a sign of being moved by the spir- - ^Krista didn't have any firm plans for after graduation. But TShe is interested in a youth ministry program involving drama, , singing and preaching. Praying on the football field .Mark, the son of Gary and Pat Carson, admits the football season _vyasn't much of a success. But the .school's athletes made up for any ,low moments in other sports this year at track meets this spring. "Out of 34 events, we won gold medals in 19," Mark said of the first state Christian track meet. Emmanuel also placed high in several other track meets including one at Lincoln, where the school finished seventh out of 14 schools. "At every meet, we were the smallest school there," he said. Mark is headed to Trinity Bible College in Ellendale, N.D., on a scholarship to play football and baseball. He plans to study Bible, pastoral studies, youth ministry and coaching. As his principal and coach, Mattson said he'll remember Mark for throwing a 40-yard touchdown pass that was called back because of a penalty. On the next play, Mark simply threw another pass to make the score. "I'll also remember him for calling his teammates together to pray, for any athlete who went down on the field," Mattson said. "When we played St. Xavier, he prayed for a student he had just creamed." Mark is another student who his classmates said would succeed. "He is set on what he wants to do, and he's already doing it," said his friend James. "He's a youth pastor kind of guy." James, the son of Gene Bengtson and Shelley Bengtson, is more the computer-programmer kind of guy. That's what he plans to study next fall at Iowa Western Community College near Omaha, Neb. On his last day of high school with two final exams to finish, James spent much of the morning in prayer. He was one of several seniors who volunteered to lead prayer during the Friday weekly worship service. "Let your spirit come down upon us," he prayed. "We give thanks for having you as our savior and the joy that brings. Let us carry it and spread it to others." In his final assignment for English, James also wrote an essay about his senior year. "We had our triumphs and our downfalls," he said. "In football, we had a prayer huddle to pray to get us through the football season." But the class had good times, too, in track, cheerleading, basketball and speech and drama. "It's been a great year I'll never forget," he said. THE RICK MACH SHOW 4prn-5pm Weekdays Leaving things up to God One lasting memory involved his classmate Eric Jones, the son of John and Colleen Jones. "I remember Eric falling asleep in class and stealing his book so he wouldn't know what to say when he was called upon," James said. James and the other class members said Eric would be the most apt to become an astronaut because of how well he does in science and math. "And we know this guy can sleep anywhere," James said. Eric plans to work for a year to raise money for college. Because of his high score on his college entrance exam, Eric also will qualify for a scholarship to Oral Roberts University. There he hopes to study the ministry to be a youth pastor. "God told me," he said of making that decision. God also helped Christina Jaster with her college plans. She initially didn't think she could afford the tuition charged by private Christian colleges. But with a 4.0 grade point average, the school's valedictorian was able to get a scholarship and accepted into a program at Sterling College to work with special children. "I put it in his hands, and God has worked everything out," she said. . Christina, the daughter of Paul and Carolyn Jaster, wants to be an elementary school teacher. Johnnie Anderson, the kindergarten teacher for 4-year-olds at Emmanuel, says Christina is a natural. "She can take over my class with no problem," Anderson said. "I'm tempted to flunk her so she won't graduate, and I can keep her around. But she'll make an excellent teacher." On a recent day, Christina was surrounded by 21 4-year-olds as she read a book abput birds. Her reward has been frequent hugs and a set of candle sticks the students gave her as a going-away gift. She carefully packed candle sticks away as she prepared to leave the school after graduation. Her students not only had given her the inspiration for her career but a symbol to remember the 1998 Emmanuel graduating class's Bible verse: "Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven." — Matthew 5:16 WATCH FOR OUR AD IN TOMORROWS PAPER . • I i • .arol OoH")in<s i-._ 110 S. Santa Fc • Downtown It's Worth The Trip NEWS TALK 91O OUR OFF in Ellwworth High Robert Weatherley , Jennifer Boyer little House Adult Learning Center Jennifer Mernahan MinneapoBs Kanay R< Salina South High •Heather Anderson Bobbi Mattox CarissQ Perez Veronica Sales HI Marketing Services 1808 South 9th Street •Salina Employment Opportunities: 827-27i ITI Marketing Services MAY 28,29, ft 30,19S8 -I* Daryl Bixby Construction Co. -« 'wishes to Congratulate our 1998 Graduates Melissa Bixby Amber Kindlesparger Chan Thomas Magna Cum Laude \ Kansas State University South High Salina, Ks. Vo-Tech Dental Assistant Lawn & Garden SUPPLIES BEDDING PLANTS. Flower or vegetable plants. 3.99^99 5.99 AS? I C QQ 5 Gallon lO.ljy Reg. 19.99 BUD & BLOOM ROSES. Non-patent rose bushes. 20% '0 OFF Reg. Retail 5 GAL. SHADE OR FRUIT TREES IN STOCK. SELECTION WILL VARY BY STORE EACH FEEDS 5,000 So. FT. Reg. 9.99 TURF BUILDER*. Lawn fertilizer. Reg. 13.99 TURF BUILDER PLUS y. With weed kill. 79.99 GAS STRING TRIMMER. 23cc 2 cycle engine. #SX-135 Dual Line 15" Swath 44 99 ~ • • W W Reg. 54.99 RAIN TRAIN. Sprinkler travels path of hose. Thursday, May 21 through Tuesday, May 26 1820 S. Ninth Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m. - 10 p.m. Salina, Ks. Sun. 11 sum. -7p.m. Nightly Events • BBQ-6:00 p.m. • Music Shows - 6:30 p.m. • Rodeo - 8:00 p.m. • Parade - Saturday, May 30th at 4:30 p.m. • $7,000 Added Money • Trophy Buckle to Each Event Winner Adults - $6.00 Advance, $7.00 Gate Children - $2.00 Advance, $3.00 Gate Ticket for Admission Only BBQ Available on Rodeo Grounds JC Rodeo Co. - Stock Contractor Sponsored By Bennington Lions Club Advance Tickets Available At: BENNINGTON Bennington Lions Club Eastside Oil Co. Bennington State Bank Westside Ventures United Insurance Agency Snack Bar CJ's Cafe Headdress MINNEAPOLIS City Pharmacy Bennington State Bank D & G Oil Co. ABILENE Rittel's Western Wear SALINA Anderson Leather Western Discount Mel's Tack & Saddle Vanderbilt's Morgan Supply Bennington State Bank Tina Dunne & the Bill Burrows Band Friday Night Music Show Mike Self & Tumbleweed Thursday & Saturday Night Music Show w^-'W'sr-'wwr^^ .^.^a-^aiSL^.^m^-»^

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