The Ottawa Herald from Ottawa, Kansas on October 11, 1961 · Page 4
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The Ottawa Herald from Ottawa, Kansas · Page 4

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Ottawa, Kansas
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Wednesday, October 11, 1961
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OTTAWA HERALD Page Four Wednesday, October 11, 1961 From Our Readers A Non-Conformist Speaks Mrs. Jack Elder's letter to the Herald (Oct. 6, 1961) did not impress me very much. I am sick and tired of listening to these self-imposed communist "witch hunters" of which all too often ministers, artists and writers are targets. In all cases of such persons I have known they are not and never were communists. But these very professions demand that they often think differently from the prevailing masses. Too many people (and Ottawans seem especially prone) regard anyone with an opinion or idea that is a shade different from the "popular majority" as being instinctively wrong, misguided, or somehow communistic. In my own case I am an artist—and a nonconformist in my field. In art school I insistently drew pictures of butterflies while other students drew vases of fruit. I was a non-conformist. I didn't want to draw what all the other students were drawing—but it made my art teachers feel uncomfortable; I wasn't "conforming". Today, looking back, I'm so glad I didn't. My own case illustrates perfectly the truism that any idea that amounts to anything must be the product of in- This And That by jph dependent thought—the very thing everybody seems to be regarding as distasteful, disturbing, or, as today's extremists would say "Communistic" when it is not necessarily so at all. Let's remember that democracy isn't perfect either—not by a long shot; it just happens to be the best type of government that we have so far been able to devise. William H. Howe, RFD 1, Ottawa. Our Own Industry We are always pleased to hear of new industry coming to Ottawa. But may we not overlook the grand industry we have in our Public Utilities. It is self-perpetuating, gives employment to 52 Otta- wans with a monthly pay roll over $20,000, will have contributed to our financial need for city government this year $75,000 and next year $100,000 which would be made up in additional taxes otherwise, profitable enough to allow for needed expansion (presently more than $500,000 on hand) without a tax levy and at the same time allow us comparative low utility rates. This industry belongs to us. Let's keep it as we'seek to gain other industry.- Rev. Thomas E. Ingle, North Baptist Church. Eternal Game At Khyber JPH KARACHI — Afghanistan, the next country to the north, severed diplomatic relations with Pakistan the other day. Consulates in both countries have been closed. The border has been sealed. Even more troops than usual have been concentrated at either end of the Khyber Pass which is the only main road between them. Relations are seriously strained, but it has to be remembered that they have been off and on for centuries. The nations, the flag, the uniforms, the ostensible issues are new. The game has been going on longer than history records. The Khyber is the bottleneck through which the northern hordes can sweep down on the Indian subcontinent. Periodically they have, from before the time of Alexander the Great, ,on down. Periodically between the bottleneck haT been successfully corked. Twice Defended In the era that Rudyard Kipling romanticized in tale and ballad the British stopped the Pass. Not only that, but twice in the last half of the 19th century they pushed north through it in an effort to subdue the Afghan tribes and create a buffer state against the expansionist ambitions of Czarist Russia. And twice they were repulsed. From the days of Gunga Dhin a down through the two World Wars, however, the British kept the Khyber Pass cork firmly in place. But now To Your Good Health the sun has set on their Empire and the red coats have gone. The cork is working loose. To detail the differences between Pakistan and Afghanistan and the difficulties with the tribesmen on both sides of the border, who continued to be bribed by everyone without being effectively bought, hides rather than reveals the essential story. Neither nation has any territorial ambitions on the other. Each is almost overwhelmed by its domestic problems. Militarily both are only as strong as the weapons given them. Pakistan is further inhibited by the threat of Indian attack from the east should she find herself engaged to the north. Basic Nonsense So it is basic nonsense for two such new, weak nations to be making motions toward war, but pressures by their respective sponsors may be forcing them nearer. If a serious effort i made teo pop the Khyber Pass cork it will have much less to do with Communism than with another effeort to make come true the old Czarisl dream of warm water ports. If the cork is held firmly in place it will be because the determination of the western powers to deny Russia this ambition is as firm as it was in the Crimea. Will there be war again around the Khyber Pass, we asked a knowledgable Karachi newspa perman? He shrugged. "The Afghanistans have nothing with which to fight — except Russians.' Would the Russians actually move in this direction behind a window dressing of Afghans? Most unlikely as a primary objective. Not incon ceivably as a sudden feint while the world's primary attention was concentrated on Berlin. , Can Be Result Of Tension By DR. JOSEPH G. MOLNER "Dear Dr. Molner: I have a teenage daughter Who gets very nervous about her school work. "Even though she eats a good breakfast, she gets worried in school and her stomach starts growling from her nervousness. This worries her still more and she dreads going each morning for fear other students will hear her stom- ich growl. "Do you have a solution that i might help ease this tension?; —D.E.S." . From the physical standpoint, no. From the emotional standpoint, yes. This isn't a question of what makes her stomach growl, but of what makes her "very nervous about her school work." Is she a good, fair or poor Dr. Molner student? If she is a poor student and worried about passing, then maybe she needs some help. An understanding teacher may be able to give all of tehe advice and aid that are necessary. Teachers are usually more than willing to go out of their way to help a student who is worried about passing, if not very anxious to help the sort of student who doesn't care. This girl, obviously cares. And worries. Or am I on the wrong track? Is she a pretty good student who worries because she isn't an all-A student? What is she worrying about? Those are the important questions. It is of secondary importance only that her stomach growls. The growling is the result of nervous tension. Relax the nerves, and the growling will take care of itself. Eating a good breakfast is fine. Maybe getting up 15 minutes earlier and eating more slowly might help. In emotional as well as physical problems, when you face up to the basic facts, the symptoms take care of themselves. When you just "treat symptoms," you never get anywhere. Never mind 'the growls. Get at the worries. Bf sides, it's only a big stomach growl that is heard by anyone else. I know several "stomach growlers" who are periodically saying "excuse me" when nobody else even heard the growl. Hemorrhoids can be cured! If troubled with fissures, fistulas, itching and other rectal prob lems, write to Dr. Molner in care of Box 158 Dundee, 111., requesting a copy of his booklet "The Real Cure For Hemorrhoids," enclosing a long, self-addressed, stamped envelope and 20c in coin to cover handling. Auld Lang Syne 25 YEARS AGO Newton Brown was among 5th grade pupils with perfect spelling records for the month o; September at Chippewa School. There was new tension in Europe as Jose Stalin, Soviet dictator, warned Fascist-Nazi na tions to stop aiding Spanish Fascists in the Spa nish civil war. A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. Lewi: Fisher, of 10 miles south of Ottawa. 50 YEARS AGO L. A. Ames, a civil engineer for Ransom & Cook, contractors, went to Ethel, Mo., on busi ness. Mrs. R. W. Emerson returned from Erie where she had visited relatives. A new cement sidewalk was being laid n front of the office of Dr. Wheeler, the Western Union office and the Hunter Tailor Shop, replac ing a stone slab walk. Prayer For Today I am the light of the world: he that fol- lowcth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life. (John 8:12.) PRAYER: Our God and heavenly Father, a .this moment we lift our thoughts to Thy throne of grace, seeking to thank Thee for blessing received. Accept our gratiteude, 0 Lord, ant grant that we may always humble ourselves a Thy feet to adore and serve Thee. In Jesus name. Amen. uui ',"7 ffi • ill PL pSij';ii,;| to,,,^,.!' '"»" !l ,f Kf: f^i'.;,';,"*',;' • *£»»**•** WdmftiT' j;,! i ^\m ii rt|j ^ :.i% lj " J " A Visit With Ike Former President Dwight D. Eisenhower (left) makes a point in his conversation on the Presidency with CBS News Correspondent Walter Cronkite, Channels 5 and 13, 9 p.m. Thun- day, Oct. 12. w. mmaixmmumvm • i J.K3X EP , „ j , j __ ', ' 'j_',i' ^Ijtti^Lil ', t .'.J. --..(j, tJaiih^A^Btfcr^t^i^UaMdi^MiMiilBllll'J^^ Television Log Channel 4, NBC Wednesday 0:00 4—Picture of the Day 5—Karly Show fl— Popcye 13—Quick Draw McOraw 6:30 4—Highway Patrol 5—Early Show 9— Quick Draw McOraw 13—Film 5:45 13—Sports With Dev Nelson 6:60 13— Business Newi 5:55 5—Sports, Harold Mack 13—Weather with Gordon Jump 6:1)0 4—News 5—News with Harold Mack 9—Man From Cochlse 13—News with Don Harrison 6:10 5—Weather with Johnny Yatei 6:16 6-13—News with Douilai Kdward* 6:30 4—Wagon Train 5-13—Alvln 9—Steve Allen 7:00 4—Wagon Train 5—Talent Roundup 9—Steve Allen 13—Donna Reed 7:30 4—Joey Bishop 5-13—Checkmate 9—Top Cat 8:00 4—Perry Como 5-13—Ch-ckmate 9—Hawaiian Eye 8:»C 4—Perry Como 5—Mrs. O. Goes To College 9—Hawaiian Eye 13—Beachcomber 9:00 4—King of Diamonds 5-13—Armstrong Circle B—Naked city 9:30 4—Brinkley's Journal 5-13—Stenl Hour !)—Naked City 10:00 4-5-9-13—New* 10:10 4-5—Weather 10:15 4—Jack Paar 5—Fa.hiT Krows Best 9—Peter Gum 13—Weather—Gordon Jump 10:20 13—Bports With De» NelioB 10:30 4—Jack Paar 6—Father Knows Best 9—Peter Oui>n 13—Ichabod and Me 10:45 5—Five Star Theater, "Wild Harvest" 13—Big Show, "Deception" 11:(IU 4—Jack Paar 5—Five-Star The»tr«. 9—Big Show 13—Target: Corrupton U:3» 4—j ack Paar 6 —Five-Star Theatre 9—Big Show 12:00 4—Reporter's Scratchpad 9—Dally Word 11:10 5—Life of Rlley Thursday 6:00 4—Continental Classroom 6:25 6—Postmark Mid - America 6 >30 4—Continental Classroom 13—College of the Air 6:40 4—One Way to Safety 6:55 5—Farm Fact* 7:00 4—Today 5—College of the Air 13—Rush Hour 7:15 9—Good Morning 7:30 4—Today 5—Moment of Meditation 9—Shakespeare 13—Rush Hour 7:35 5—Cartoonland 8:00 4—Today 5-13—Captain Kangaroo 9—Heckle It Jeckle 8:30 4—Today 5-13—Captain Kangaroo 9—Whizzn's Wonderland 9:00 4—Say When 5—Jack La Lanne 9—Romper Room 13—Calendar 9:30 4—Play Your Hunch 5-13—I Love Lucy 9—Masterpiece Movie, "Split Second" 10:00 4—Price Is Right 5-13—Double Exposure 9—Movie 10:30 4—World Series Spotlight 5—Your Surprise Package »--- ?'nvip 13—World Series Spelcal 10:45 4-13—World Series 10:55 9—News 11:00 4-13—World Series 55—Love of Live 9—Texan 11 ::il) 4-13—World Series 5—-Search for Tomorrow 9-—Love That Bob 11:45 6—Guiding Light 11:55 4—News 12:00 Noon 4-13—World Series 6-13—News i) Camouflage 13:05 55—News 12:10 13-Markets A Weather 12:30 4—News, markets 12:30 4-13—World Series 5-13-Aa The World Tumi 9—Make a Face 1:00 4-13—World Series 6—Password Channel 5-13, CBS 9—Day in Com t 1:3« 4-13—World Series 5—House Pai-;y 9—Topper 2:00 4—Young Dr. Malone 5-13—Millionaire 9—Day ID Court 2:30 4—Award Theater 5-13—Verdict la Yours 9—Seven Ke,s 3:00 4—Make room for Daddy 5-13—Brighter Day 9—queen foi A Day 3:15 5—Secret Storm 3:30 4—Here's Hollywood 5-13—Edge of Night 9 — Who do you Trust? 4:00 4—Kukla and Ollle 5—Early Show. "Go West Young Lady" 9—American Bandstand 13—News 4:05 4—Mr, Magoo 4:10 13—Weather 4:13 4—Picture of the Day, "No Minor Vices" 5—Early Show, 13—Cartoons 4:30 4—Picture of the Day Channel 9, ABC Tonight's TV Highlights 6:00 Channel 9 — "Man From Cochise." An old boy sells his share in a gold mine. 6:30 Channel 9 — "Steve Allen." Allen has his customary good show lined up, or Channels 5-13 - "Alvin." The new chipmunk cartoon series, or Channel 4 — "Wagon Train." Barbara Stanwyck is the star of this one, titled "The Maud Frazer Story." 7:00 Channel 5 — "Talent Roundup." 7:30 Channel 9 - "Top Cat." Title is "Hawaii — Here We Come," or Channel 4 — "Joey Bishop." Danny Thomas is a guest star, or Channels 5-13 — "Checkmate." Tony Randall is the star, portraying a man who wants to get up the ladder of success faster and decides that one of the shortcuts would be to kill the boss. 8:00 Channel 4 — "Perry Como." Among his guests this evening, Perry has that funny guy, Paul Lynde, who appeared a number of times last season on the Como show, or Channel 9 — "Hawaiian Eye." A valuable pearl is involved. It's a valuable pearl with a very dead owner. 8:30 Channel 5 — "Mrs. G. Goes to College." On the Gertrude Berg show this evening, Peter Lorre is a guest. 9:00 Channel 4 — Start of a new show, "King of Diamonds." This'n features Broderick Crawford as a security agent who deals in diamonds, or Channel 9 - "Naked City." It's about a corpse running down the street, which is, of course, just a little unusual, or Channels 5-13 — "Legend of Murder," drama. 9:30 Channel 4- "Brinkley's Journal." A new half-hour weekly news comment program, with David Brinklcy. Late movies include: "Wild Harvest," 1947, Alan Ladd, Channel 5, 10:45. 9— Deputy Dawg 13— Cartoons 4:15 9—Rocky and Friends 5:00 4—Picture of the Day 5—Early Show 9—Popeye 13—Comment 6:30 4— Highway Patrol 5—Early Show 9—Popeye 13—Film Feature 5:40 13—Sporu wltb DeT Nelson 5:50 13—Bulness News 5:55 5— Sport* 13—Weather with Gordon Jump 11:00 4—New» 5—News with Harold Mack 9—Yogi Bear 13—News with Don Harrison 6:10 4—News 5—Weather, with Johnny Yates 6:15 4—Huntley-Brlnkley Report 5-13—News with Douglas Edwards 6:30 4—Outlaws 5-13—Frontier Circus 9_Wyatt Earp 7:00 4—Outlaws 5-13—Frontier Circus 9—Donna Reed 7:30 4—Dr Klldare 5-13—Bob Cummings 9—Rep.) McCoy* 8:00 4—Dr Kildare 5-13—In; (jstigators 9—My Throe Sons 8:30 4—Hazel 5-13—Investigators 9—Jim Backus 9:00 4—Sing Along With Mitch 6-13—C.B.S. Reports U— Untochables 9:30 4—Sing Along With Mitch 5-13—Where we Stand 8—Untouchables 10:1)0 4-5-9-13—Now* 10:10 4-!r—Weather 10:15 4—Jack Paar 5—Five Star Theater. "The Male Animal" 9—Peter Gunn 13—Weather 10:20 13—Sports wltb DAT Nelson 10:30 4—JacK Paar 5—Five Star Theater 9—Peter Gunn 13—Kansas Afield 10:45 9—Big Show, "Tiger In the Smoke" 11:00 4- -Jack Paar 5—Five-Star Theatre* 9—Big Show 13—Movie, "The Saint's Double Trouble." 11:30 4—Jack Paar 5—Five-Star Theatr* 9—Big Show, 13—Movletime U.S.A. 13:00 4—Reporter's Scratchpad 9—Unity Daily Word 13—Movie 12:10 5—Late Show, "Go West Younr Lady'' DIVERSIFIED SERVICES, INC. FOUNDED 1894 •xc/usive national distributor for • FIVE MUTUAL FUNDS • ONE FACE-AMOUNT CERTIFICATE CO. • Pension and profit shoring plan services for o proipectut-booklet and information write or call Hazen L. Richardson Zone Manager 1438 S. Hickory Phone CH 2-2773 also ask about A practical approach to Life Insurance needs SYNDICATE LIFE Insurance and Annuity Company DIVERSIFIED SEIVICIS, INC "People" Show Deserves Cheers By CYNTHIA LOWRY AP TV-Eadio Writer NEW YORK -AP)-A dramatic anthology series with something of the quality of "Playhouse 90" maoe its debut on ABC Tuesday nitjht. The comparison between the two is inevitable because the first program of the weekly series and one of the last "Playhouse 90" dramas were pegged to the same theme: group psychiatric treatment. The "Premiere" theater's hour- long play, "People Need People," was based on cases actually handled by Dr. Harry Wilmer, a physician who experimented with group handling of seriously disturbed male patients in a Navy hospital. "Playhouse 90's" treatment, "Journey to the Day," took place in a state institution and in- cludnd women in the group. Progress of Dr. Wilmer's first group, some 10 enlisted men and officers, was the plot of the show. There was particular concentration on the most violent patients, a Marine sergeant who arrived in a straightjacket and was both homicidal and suicidal. Lee Marvin played the disturbed man, and very authoritatively. Ottawa Boiler Rink Public Sessions Wed. and Fit, 7:30 to 10:00 Sat. nights, 8:00 to 11:00 Private Parties Mon., Tues., and Thurs. 2nd and Main CH 2-9704 There was no banal happy ending or any quick cure, but the program held a hopeful note for the futures of many mental patients. It was a gripping, well-knit drama, both thoughtful and constructive. If it is typical of the weekly series, we really have something to cheer about. Fred Astaire made his debut as host of the series, but didn't have much to do except greet us and tell us about next week. Ottawa Herald 106-108 B. Main Published dally except Sunday and Holidays. Second class postage at Ottawa, Kansas. Robert B Wellington .Editor Guy Snedakt" Publisher Subscription rates to trade area—By mall, one month 85: three months, $2; six months, 13.70: one year. 17. Subscription rates oulMde trade area —By mall, one month. 11.50: three months 14.25; ilx months. JS.OO; on* year. J15.00. MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The Associated Press li entitled exclusively to the use for publication of all the local news printed ID the news, paper as wall a* all AP news dispatch. Closed Tonite and Thurs. Coming Fri. - Sat. - Sun. "On The Beach" "Gunman's Walk 1 HILLCREST DRIVE-IN Hurry — Ends Tonight! Box office opens 7 p.m. Feature at 8:00 p.m. only ICH TktMinUM VMIIIiV if eM*(eMV withumuks t« Uli lihlal! 6AZZARA ALBERT CLARK BALIN •nwiiOUNB DOCTORS \ Cartoon — New* STARTS TOMORROW Box Office Opens 7 P.M. — Shown 9:10 Only The Confidential Report On The Bachelor Boys •The Things They Do To Get The Girls! n UUUET <i iFRANKiE /.MARTHA PROVUSE/VAUGHAN/HYER «> GARY . .DAVID iDnCDV MCI CAM "°»" oscw BROONEY • c "^" OHIO LnUjUl III LCAIl s "r"fAf*MICHAELKANIN-^S; CO-HIT Shown 7:55 Only

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