Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas on September 19, 1974 · Page 8
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Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas · Page 8

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Hope, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Thursday, September 19, 1974
Page:
Page 8
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Vage Eight HOPE (ARK.) STAR Independents are dropping gasoline prices NEW YORK (AP) - Independent gasoline stations arc dropping pump prices as much as 13 cents a gallon, cutting into sales of many higher- priced, major brand dealers, an Associated Press survey shows. "There's definitely some easing of price all around, especially in the wholesale price available to independents," says Dan Lundberg of the Lundberg Survey of national retail gasoline prices. "Two months ago, the market for independent gasoline had almost dried up, but now it's open again," says a spokesman for the St. Louis-based Society of Independent Gasoline Marketers. "Independent refiners who sell to the independent retailers are getting more imported crude and more of the cheaper domestic crude which the majors have to sell off out of their inventories through the (federal) allocation system." 'As a result, the independents' price has dropped 4 to 5 cents a gallon generally, and they're passing it along to the customer. Some independents are going one step further and cutting their profit margins down to build up the sales volume they lost to the majors during the gasoline shortage." Industry gasoline supply figures indicate that there is more of the fuel in stock this year than the same time last year, but demand is holding about even with last year's level. This means that the majors are having trouble selling all their gasoline through their own outlets. Many dealers say the increased supply of gasoline has come from conservation by motorists. But some dealers say the major oil companies are purposely holding prices at high levels to boost their profits. This has acted as a deterrent to retail sales, which helps supplies but hurts business, they say. "I guess they're more con-' cerned with their stockholders than they are about their dealers and their customers," says a Phillips Petroleum dealer in Topeka, Kan. In Louisiana, where independents have cut prices about five cents a gallon this summer, Exxon dealer Munroe Reed of New Orleans says, "Their lower prices are hurting me and brand dealers like me." Reed says he and other Exxon dealers have complained for a month to Exxon to lower prices in their area but have seen no results. Gasoline in Charlotte, N.C., is down 13 cents a gallon from its peak and is selling at 45.7 cents a gallon at independent stations. Major brands are still selling at 58.7 cents a gallon. Exxon dealer James Robinson of Charlotte complains that his sales are down 25 per cent as customers desert him for lower priced gas. He says Exxon has suggested he stay open longer to try to sell more gas, but the company won't cut Fatality trial to begin Monday HAMBURG, Ark. (AP) - A trial is expected to begin Monday in Ashley County Circuit Court in a $905,000 damage suit filed against a bus driver and the Crossett school district's insurance company. The suit resulted from an accident Oct. 26, 1973 in which four persons were killed. W. R. Blankenship alleges in the suit that the bus driver, Harold Wayne Dyer of Crossett, was negligent in failing to yield the right of way when the bus collided with a logging truck driven by Blankenship's son, Roger, 22. Young Blankenship and three passengers in the truck were killed. The suit alleges that the Southern Farm Bureau Casualty Insurance Co. was negligent in that the school district failed to properly equip and maintain the bus. The school bus was taking students to school, but none of the students was injured. Stockpiled food sent to famine-stricken By The Associated Press Millions of pounds of food stockpiled in American fallout shelters during the 1960s are being sent abroad to aid famine-stricken nations. "Rather than let the stuff go rancid in the shelters, the thing to do is try to feed somebody with it," says John L. Padgett, Louisiana's deputy director of civil defense. Communities across the nation are doing just that. An Associated Press survey shows at least 30 states and 40 communities have donated or plan to donate a percentage of the stockpiled food to hungry nations. Most of the food consists of survival crackers and is going to Bangladesh. The crackers are part of some 150,000 tons of crackers that remain from supplies stockpiled in shelters between 1962 and 1964, according to a civil defense spokesman in Washington. The supplies were turned over to the control of communities where they were stocked. The Agency for International Development and CARE have sent shipments of the crackers to 19 countries, including Bangladesh and Nicaragua, the spokesman said. Most of the food in the shelters has passed its shelf-life of about five years and if the supplies are not used soon they will become inedible. Edward W. Kroll, Dane County, Wis., emergency planning director, said his county's supplies had dwindled because they deteriorated and had to be removed. Kroll said Wisconsin has agreed to send 2.1 million pounds of crackers to Bangladesh. Some communities are finding other uses for the supplies: Some using them as landfill] Kentucky civil defense officials say they have sent some spoiled food to feed livestock at state prison farms; Michigan officials said some had been given to zoos. Many of the communities said they were donating the food because they were running out of storage space. HEARING AID SERVICE Invites Anyone Troubled With a Hearing Problem To Attend a Special BETTER-HEARING CONSULTATION TOMORROW) Johnson Motel on E. 3rd Street from 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. Mr. Elton Powell, Factory-trained Beltone Hearing Aid Specialist will be present to counsel with you on your problem. We are fortunate to have obtained his services for this limited time and urge you to take advantage of this opportunity. Bring your family with you- NO OBLIGATION. If you cannot attend, be sure to phoue (777-3530) so ait appointment can be made for you at another time. prices. Ohio dealers report price skirmishes between offbrand dealers in Detroit and Cincinnati, but major brands aren't lowering their prices. In New Hampshire, station owners in Manchester say com- petition has reduced prices to 50.9 cents a gallon from 56 cents. And in Chicago, where prices vary as much as eight cents a gallon, some stations are advertising car wash deals or soap or candy with gas. WOWt LOOK AT ABC NOW! family center Thursday. September 19, if»74 * HERVEY SQUARE 600 N. HERVEY SI" OPEN 9-9 MON. THRU SAT. PRICES GOOD THRUSAT B ita^Mh consequences TRUTH 6:OO 6:3O HEREiswhe e 1o find all of GLENFIELD Model 75 THE ODD COUPLE New Season! With the handicap of a back injury, a doubled- over Felix wins the championship for his bowling team. Tony Randall and Jack Klugman star. 7:OO M 22 Caliber long rifle, automatic carbine, 9 shot tube magazine, walnut stock with 4X scope. 22 CALIBER AUTOMATIC RIFLE Model SB40 SINGLE BARREL selected hard- „ c „ wood stock, decorative scrolls. Full ihokes. SHOTGUN 12,20 or 410 GAUGE Paper Moon •• ^ *£&& NEW SHOW! What little girl wouldn't want to win first prize in a Shirley Temple look-alike contest? Christopher Connelly and Jodie Foster star. SAVAGE SPRINGFIELD Model 87 Pump Shotgun Walnut stock, side ejection; tapered slide handle, steel barrel; chambered for 2-3/4" & 3". 12 or 20 GAUGE PUMP SHOTGUN FULL or MODIFIED CHOKE THE STREETS OF SAN FRANCISCO New Season! Detective Keller has romance on his mind, but his lovely new neighbor has murder on hers! Karl Maiden, Michael Douglas star. 8:OO 1. Model 94 Lever Action Carbine. Chambered for the traditional 30-30 Winchester cartridge. Rear sight and hooded front sight. Half-cock safety. Plus barrel band. WINCHESTER DEER RIFLE MARK X INTERARMS RIFLE 30.06 Caliber HARRY O NEW SHOW! The Admiral is convinced his missing wife is in danger. Harry O agrees, but for different reasons! David Janssen stars. Leif Ericson, Sharon Acker guest. Model #2104 Bolt action. Ramp mounted front sight and removable hood. Adjustable rear sight, walnut stock. Detachable sling swivels. COLEMAN TWO MANTLE LANTERN *° 220H195 BURINS ALL NIGHT WITHOUT REFILLING PLAN AHEAD... ay-awa ^f , s/ywii. AMOUNT oon-ov 22 Caliber LONG RIFLE SHELLS TONIGHT TELEVISION THREE (CT8S SHREVEPORT Hi-Power '100's Sliding lid uncovers 5 shells at a time. STOCK UP NOW LIMIT 2 SHOTGUN SHELLS F121-12 Gauge

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