Cumberland Sunday Times from Cumberland, Maryland on September 17, 1944 · Page 8
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Cumberland Sunday Times from Cumberland, Maryland · Page 8

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Cumberland, Maryland
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Sunday, September 17, 1944
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Page 8
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EIGHT SUNDAY TIMES, CUMBERLAND, !\!D., SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1941 Cumberland-Made Tires With Armed Forces On All Fronti •-^-?*&*^ tff • <r*»T >r '?' f '- •.-.;•• -L ^:l:;^y^ 5 ^^i^Ss^^ Thi-v is ;t Michrlin tire. Curivpean-rnade, which was used by the Germans before It-, rapture with much otlicr material by thr American forces in Kuropc. The method of repair used !>y the Nazlr,, iiluslraicd above, is an indication of the extent tn uhirh thvlr rubber supply had been depicted. A palch Is mrrdy "plugged" cm to the >iclr«.ill f.f tills lire. Here ar* Kelly-Springfield tires, made in Cumberland, and doing duty cm one invaded by the Americans. Local tires are found around the world — and so many an acute need for workers at the local Kclly-Sprlngficld plant. of the^man.r Islands more are called for of the Pacific that there is Tires at-war take a terrible beating as this pile of American and foreign tires shows. In addition to the hard use all tires undergo in war zones, there is the damage inflicted by shellflre and land mines. Several of those pictured still have good tread but have been damaged by the explosive force delivered by weapons of modern warfare. fine thk i> Kfcim tewpai Iwlv < ljir.es llaitei •dies* Tribiiii Intel r, Mi 2 cc told-: it S al )CS3 Isrua; :ste ' £5 It anal ssfcri f folk i an KngI r.o* lilahc led ii b.d ex tpcrte Bf VI avinE I.o.iilini; ruliber. carbon black and other Ingredients Into two-story Banbury mixer lor i umponiHlinic hrforr oilier Tirercsses begin. Rolls of cord fabric p;iss thru calendar machine which forces rubber into and around cords. Each side in turn, is impregnated before the next operation. Rubberized fabric, after calendaring operation, la cut into strips and plied Into "bands" ready for the important tire building operation. m r.y. ; t im ;- ei lloiilrti ruhlirr i« lirre forced out through dies iindrr jrreat pressure lo form tread and sidcwall unit. Thr trend clcsien i-omrs in n later nprratinn, but the special rubber material on which the tread Is im- prrs'rd U made here. Ply by ply, bands of cord fabric are here built up, beads put in place and the rubber tread m.itrrial applied in this important tire building operation. This is where the lire is actually built up from plifs of rubber and fabric. Finished "raw" tire (slightly visible at left with no tread design) Is cured in huge ctamshej. 1 presses, one of which is partially open above. The tread design is formed under tremendous pressure during tins "cure" process. (The mold Is seen in raised upper part of press.) Kiscnhower (Continual from Pjgr n) } '•Id warrior-, \shci hnt! Ui n l!no'i';h : iniiny can:liai:ii!.^, ! "rnyiii.Vii 111 tills la.ill v|-,<i h.>;| iii-vrr lniin!H n on Hie (. i;rr:i- iri:litiiry f-sralCLiM •!!.•> Na/!-. (:i;m!r;> l!i,. Allit".: 111 J.i-.ii'i o: <';mc;u't.-.. You've tinti !<'-• Ji:id a fi'-iMiini ii:unpd fci.-i l ii!:im''i l ( . tic i! " lion Ikf iiiiijlirri ;ii ;!)<• jih(^. !t u,i>. :i(!0 y«-;ir.-i . HUT (he FiJ-^nhfiW-- i-:.i !l' - d fjeisi Cifrrnany lo e:ra|x' 'lie l :mic opjirrj-.Mnii'; aivl J^T.-CCU- l.r,n> Hit- Niixi wrie inllici in-,' tin: 'mump!-<l jii-opir. 1 iixin>. Th'' rii;)]l- <'!(]-•, \i'i:.-r;irii-c of hi:. f<'i nf;il IIL'] :• ••'.:>••• In hi. blirfxl. Throimh (viiliirif-s !•( mi'-Mn.iiri.ii:<- ui'h H.rotrii-d L-li, IJi'li.iisd IliiU-li. H-Ai. :•. Fiixh.'h. lins'.v >;rniij.-. hnrl eni.ri:<[ hl.-i vein:. In :i^rnil>!!:ii- a compctrnt. staff. Oi'iH'iiil Ki-.cnhowcr, who wn;-; ii'l- %.HKrcl (o I lir rnnk of lif'iirivi!' 1 . f'ri<:,i| on ,lulv 0. h.'icl Tinder him I !!"••• Olf) Ilil'IKl.'! Ill Wllfj.11 III- Jihiccfj linpili'i! iviillidcncr:: I.l?iil - f • . AiKir'" 1 . H|i;in|/ ;iv h|s nir •'.-.'"•:. ihr :i:-n Miij.-tji-i]. Mark \V. Ci;>lk :<.. lir-.id oi ;:-.-.;iii<l dprra- tions: MnJ.-Gpn. John C. H. LPP. 3f fruporvif.or of .supply. "Ike.' a doughboy a: heart. In- Mstcd that hi.<. troops I XT kept happy. 'I hov werr; arrlvinc wHh unpirtett- eiiti-r .<-[;<-'•[!: tiinir .spirits must, iiiinnt ;i Hied n^ tliev ncrnrrH 1 :iie'l IN a new world while lying rigorously trained for the ahc.ul Dl 'hem: they must l>p. given whose social opportunities were Force and the United States Air! severely limited l»y the lack, of!Forces, the general called in report-! women ol their race. Generaljcrs and declared, "Time is shorts Elsenhower remedied the .situationjnnd United States soldipr.t must bej Col. Oveta Gulp|trained to stand the most rigorous' Mt. Savage Forty Hours Devotion Opens uy Humming v^in. uvi-iit omjj• trained 10 siano ine mosi rigorous: Mt. Savacc, Sent- IB.—The Fortyjj^ ean y| jarl wa c Hobby, liciid of Uic WAAC, and j operations. I am not, asking yoiii Hours Devotion will open Sunday I Thomas'siucker" -•steps were taken to have a number of Nrsro WAACs a-^plgned o> to Great. Britain. Tln> eciir-nil dr-inandixl that they b" i;lvon it-i many of thn "comfort." of Immc" n.-; tin- conditions would allow. HLs lovr for hlr soldier. 1 ; w:iy.-; w iuv furomost. Thfy in rclurn (irmon.Mralrd their IOVP for Ikf.. dPi-lainu! liim lo In- "n rc^ulnr Icllow, just like HIP rp.sl of us. HP i. Jil;.- our oivn fatfirrs bn'-k h<imP ; .uul ivi-jii;; ».< its 11 ws were his own .' i'ii;.< " j WiulJ- ™lviru; the problem."; of] tlif'j.f Mildn'r boys with hutnnni cirvntlnn nnd prnc'.lcnl common! :t'ti~i'. IIP ovpi looked notlilni! thai In- iris. wr.nUl make thorn linppy He knrw nrlthpr tmc. nor croe<:!. !hp\ \vrro ,-,11 sonipliotly's r-r>iv ; 'I'liei-p \\rff \\ InrKP nunilx-r of Ni-i;i<» '.rooivi '>lnlii)HC{l l.i Genera! Eisenhower's flr.st victory a."i lo win the hearts of !iis oun soldiers nnd :iml people. the He British established his -! iioadqunrtory Ui an old rr.novnlcd I.<ind>)ti apartment biiikluiK which was quickly dubbed "Elsenhower Flat." liis sirnplicliy nnd Ills devotion to his fellow nu'ii. hl.i intimate touch with the common man, gave him somewhat, the chnrncler of Lincoln. One Britisher remarked, "We cull him 'Ike.' taut there's n !ot of 'Aoe' In him." The nuuitpnance of Rood - will with the British Allies Hie general considered of p!>.r:smount import- nnce. When rumors were maliciously to th<- effeci that there trouble between tlic noy.il Air take what r say because I might mornlnR at St. Patrick's Catholic bo wroiiR nnd I might- even lie to ; Church with a Hich Muss a I. fl:W Wednesday evening at the Mt. Sav-1 patient at the Allegany Hospital, age Methodist Church. i Cumbcrlnnd. I The Rev. Harris M. Waters, pas-1 Mrs. Cecil Sampson and daugh- |tc:-. officiated. Nfiss Margnrelitcrs. Pn?crin and Patty. Baltimore, bridesmaid nnd <!XVC visiting Mrs. Sampson's parents, was best map |Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Wilson. , ; UM a . : . , yon, but 1 wani. you to go around | o'clock and » proce.ss.on in whlchl!" 1 '* '' The bride wore n navy blue street' and see for yourself whether there Is any friction between the R. A. F. and our Air Force. If there is one plnce-where co-operation and collaboration is perfect, it Ls between E. A. F. and the United Stales] the pupils of St. Patrick's .school will take part. The will th and a corsa hi,,» '" of pink! •wove n Miss Lorctta Carabine visited her Mrs. William Becker, Mc- Parochinl School, .: Kecsport " St. „«,„ which resumed classe.-; Tuesday. collnb- Sunday until after the Holy hour " » J liCCji 'he wrvirr- nt 7-10 n m j'tnuw iM-mcc at 7.30 p. m , Air Force." With tremendous responsibilities*The devotion will dose Tuesday aj on his shoulders, working day iindjiMo p. in., nt which time another niRht with Indefatigable energy, j profession of the Blessed fiscra- dealiiiR with his hundreds niulimcnt will Ix; held .nd a corsage of „ , „ , brlcie nitended Beuii High Mnsses Moiuhiy-awl Tiicsdny will jschool, Frostburg, and Is employed ^ ^ ^ ^ jj u ,.pfjy company, Cumberland. Set. Blucker attended Mt. Savage High School nnd is stationed ?( Camp Stewart, Ga. Rritf Mention has 71 toys. enrollment of D8 slrls andfornia. Oldtown Pic, Marvin C. Twigg, son of M nd Mrs. C. S. Twlge, is spenrii:- In 15-day furlough from Can:; 'Campbell, Ky. Cpl. Wade Morral. son of Mr. ai'' Mrs. Marvin Morrol. Paw Paw, W Vs.. is spending a 12-day furloiKf at home. He will return to Cfl> ibe celebrated nt 6 nnd S a. m. his nnd him nt BuekinRham Palace on I S°l ,.„;:,„'. Jiilv R in mnreirnrp wil.li Kin2i CllmUermnQ Due to the weather, the wiener roust of the Intermediate Girl Scouls was postponed wnlil Tuesday. Scouts will meet at the Mctii- odlsl Church Recreation Hall lit 7 p. m. S-Sgi. George W. Koontz returned to Barksrialc Field, La., July S in confeiencr with Kin George, nnd agnin on Ai.su.st If.. autographing n drum for a proud American private. Dunes Protest Removal. Prisoners To Reid Stockholm, Sept. 1G. Wf>>—All shop nnd newspapers were closed at nex todny In Copenhagen in a demo stration against German remov of Oanlsh prisoners from Frorrslt' in Southern Jutland to NKXT: "Bp*t social . . ." niuckrr- ML r .s Gcrnldine of Mrs. Florence late I,C(,lie Buratl. Ir.nt.C. Ulucker. son QSSi* .Charles Blucker, The Rev. John R. Wilson, pastor after spending 15-day furlough of the Eckhart Mines Mcthodistfwlth his mother, Mrs. Mary Koontz. , Church, will speak at the 7:30 p. m. He is wearing the air medal with 'Sunday services at the Mt. Savage oak leaf clusters for 40 bombingi n report reaching here said Methodist Church. [missions In Europe, in addition U>| Railroad employes v\cnt In stri»'| daughter, The Uev. Rudolpli Gunkc 1 . pastorlttie good conduct medal ant! cnm-iln.st niRlit. and the of St. George's EpLiropal Church,'pnicn ribbon. He also took General; Clashes occurred in Copcnhaii^ lames Is attonniiif! the ronfcrcnce of Epis-iDoollltle on one of Ills trips. He tsilnsl night, II was reported. resnl(l rr w««b:.s.'ro|}nl minlMi-r.s nt Hngcrstown. n:: Instructor ut B.irksclaie Flcld,.in ."everal tfeath.s and '.ho \voui :f> Mrs. Charles Cunnlnghnm Js aiLa. |ing of 25 pcitons by gunfire. I

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