Covina Argus from Covina, California on September 12, 1908 · Page 3
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Covina Argus from Covina, California · Page 3

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Covina, California
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Saturday, September 12, 1908
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Page 3
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The Huslcal Outlook. In anticipation nf the coming season of music, which na a rule begins in the latter pnrt of this month, Mr. E. D. Wyckoff of LOB Angeles was in Covina last week, talking with some of the best known musicians about the prospects for good work in oiotorio and concert in this vicinity during the winter. Mr. Wyckoff is the organist at the First Baptist church in Los Angeles, and is a teacher of some marked ability. Other teachers and musical directors have also looked over this field of late with a similar idea in view. It is the opinion of several musical people of Covina. that an oratorio or secular production might impunity be attempted by Covina talent this fall. It means much hard work, however, and that work must be intelligent. With the singers dwelling in this vicinity, taking in Azuaa and Gleu- dora, it is quite possible to form a chorus of trained, or semi-trained singers, which would creditably execute some standard oratorio, but the work ;of financing and placing it on a business basis must be considered as carefully as the selection of singers and teachers. With' good judgment employed, this section might become known as a musical center of merit. One plan which has proven feasible, and which is tbe one upon which choral ssocieties are maintained in Boston and New York, ia that of the triple concert season — an oratorio with chorus of possibly one hundred, a chamber concert following, and tbe last a secular cantata of standard merit. Tickets for these concerts must be sold in advance for the entire season. This amounts practically to taking into membership all who are willing to support the concerts. Something of this nature may be done. Concerts which do not pay are failures, even though successes from a musical standpoint. And they must be ambitious concerts. FALL CIVIL SERVICE EXAHINA- TIONS. Demand for Help in (iovt. Service. For the benefit of those wishing to get into the U. S. Civil Service, the papers are giving as wide publicity as possible to the fact that Civil Service examinations for about forty different government positions .will be held in San Bernariduo during Sep*. and Oct. There is a great demand for Forest Clerks. Isthmian Canal Clerks, Bookkeepers, Stenographers, Railway Mail Clerks, etc., in the government service and at salaries of $800 to 81 GOO a year at beginning, with good opportunities for •advancement in all cases. The work is light, the hours short, the positions practically permanent. A "uod thing about many of thesn positions, as for instance, Forest Clerk, Bookkeeper, Isthmian Canal Clerk, etc., is that the qualifications which are necessary for tho Civil Service constitute the very hetst preparation for any other lino of clerical or commercial work. Hence, 110 young person makes a mistake to prepare for the work. Kan Bernardino Business College and Civil Service Institute is said to be the only school in California making a specialty of coaching for the U. S. Civil Service and assisting young people to secure government positions, examinations for which are held in tho samo building occupied by the school. Full particulars can always bo had by writing the school. Pomona's Grand Old Alan. "If \vt- have as many wives u.s King Solomon we will have all we can do to keep on good terms with one." "How much did he luavo? lie left it all." "Ladies, wedding bells .should atriko the keynote of your life. firt-ut care should be taken to preserve the harmony. It will create a Hea\en anywhere. " These remarks am extracts from the speech of M. Buldridge, deliver- i ed at tliei coii.'iinncement exercises of j Pomona High School, class of 1008. I The speech haa been "done into a ! book," und the Argus is in receipt of ; a copy through the kindness uf the j Board of Education of Pomona. Tbe words of the prose-poetical philoso- ; pher of fourscore years are well worth i perusing, for life strikes at the root ; of truth; facts garnered on tbe trail j of experience, in the Valley of Hard Knocks. (irand Old Man BaldridgB will be recalled in Covina ad once the owner uf Palmetto ranch, MOW the home ut Col. Chapman. Although, nothing of that nature is implied, it i-i ass'iined that the s|.t-ecb iuay be bad on up).lici.t i .!, in tl.e Uuard of K.juratl .n "f P' ::• i' ;i I ill!'! !,••! '-! -. • ><.-.:. Ci,.[ i ='. COVINA "A City Among the Orange Groves" E above were the words which fell from the lips of Gov. J. N. (Jillett of California, when he visited recently this fair gem set in its semi-tropic surroundings. No words more titling could have been chosen iti describing Covina, the chief town of the far-famed San Gabriel Valley. Every boulevard and driveway for miles in every direction is Hanked with peerless groves, and the very atmosphere in the early springtime is laden with the perfume of the orange blossom and the trees laden with the golden ripe fruit. Along these firm, oiled driveways, ornamental vegetation of tbe common and rarer sorts grows iti profusion, and withal are tbe lovely homes set in spacious grounds, where roses thrive in such varied richness that they appear voluptuous even amidst indescribable flora wealth. Sublimely eminent over the landscape that blesses the eye from Covina is the majestic po.ik of San Antonio and those of lesser altitude, but none the less beautiful, of the Sierra Madrc range, with their snow crowns shining: and sparkling- like jewels. Covina has no rival in Los Angeles county for beai-.ty of situation. Enhanced by the marking's of civilization, its scenic loveliness, viewed in broad perspective, is hardly surpassed anywhere. There is little danger of incuriug- ary tourist's resentment by advising- him to tarry at Covina for more than a casual glance about him. Many things he will treasure in memory are to be seen in and about the pretty burg. BIRDSEYE VIEW OF COVINA To the hoineseekerCovtna extends a standing invitation. The right hand of hospitality is all ways extended to all worthy people to cast their lots with ours and enjoy the grandeur of mountain, the perpetual gladness of vernal life, fruiting and flowering in perennial concert, an atmosphere blending the azone of mountain tops with the tincture of the sea. the conveniences of civilization, and an opportunity of securing handsome returns for their labors in the cultivation of our groves. Covina was incorporated as a city in 1901, and at once took rank as one of the best governed cities of California, which position it holds steadfastly. Our population is estimated at 2500. Covina is located twenty-one miles east of Los Angeles in the upper Sati Gabriel Valley. It is connected with Los Angeles and other points by the Southern Pacific railroad and the new line of the Pacific Electric, which furnishes hourly service, with a running time of 35 minutes, through many miles of the finest orange groves. The public schools of Covina are the pride of the people and the buildings are constructed after the most approved modern plan. In all respects they are up-to-date. Our high-school certificates are accepted in thfl leading colleges and universities, East and West. Grammar school graduates accredited in the High Softools of California and all other states. The people cf Covina are, emphatically, church-goers, and each of the six different churches are well attended. The Methodist and Baptist denominations are both building new edifices to accommodate their respective congregations, which had outgrown their present church buildings. No saloons exist in the city, and those who desire to raise families amid good social and moral environments find here au ideal community. Covina boasts of a beautiful Carnegie library, built is 1'JO.S, which is largely patronized. An especial lc itu-co in i • . jn s the children's reading room. EUJOKAU ) KAXCIl I'ronerly of J. H. Adams In few communities, ev :n in S'/tithern (California, .:;in th'-n- b>- found a [ii-opli: more uni vcr- ally imbued with civi.: [jridi.- tiian are ill'- ,;iu/i:ii?> oi ('ovinii. Tin- Covin;'. Houu; T« j le|ihone ('oiiipiiiiy IK.- cujjius it-5 own i)iiildinjj and furni.sln.--> ,i coinpl'ttc arid t-tiiciiMit -itrrvii'.t:. Sulincriln-r^ have, the use <,f over '•«.') phones, inc.ii'liii^ Irte (...r.ncctii n« will, tl.e ti.w. i;-» of A xi: -a , ( ilt-iii!<,i a, San iJitnas, Charter Oak, Irwindale ami I'ueiit..-. The Co /i ua ( i<i-> (>jin|<any , al v; ;t local in ,tu nfioii, furni thes ^as for Sotli fuel and ilhiminu'iMti. The San (iabriel I.i^ht and I'or/er (.ompany furni ->h<:.-> litjlit f(,r Covina private homes and street^, whi.:h are well lighted ],y a coiiiplete nvitein of in..a ndeii.ent lights. Tin- Covina Land and Water Company, controlled by H. E. lluu'iii^toii, f urni *!]••.'•. i ne nit y with a pure, water » up ply under excellent pressure. We have f,V'j national and two ->avint.;-> )>aiik->. Our stores are of hi;;)i order and all leading lines "f biiairie^i are represented. The Veiidome i.-, a tir-.i-.^a.i^ country hotel. Our clubs arc of a social, literary and musical nature. The Monday afternoon C.lutt, a ladii.-->' literary, federated organization, owning a nanriv.-me club-hou.ie </u the <:oi ner of Citru* avenue and O;nter street; ttu: Fortniifiitly , a ^ent lenian' •, li'erary '.l:it>; the Amphion, a muai'.al or^anix.atiori; aii't the Covina IJountry Ciur., equipped iviti; a -uitable and charming building; tlie San (Jubriel \'all<ry n.jk-- fri-'ji.cnt di-ii^ hM til r (. i. .-> t.ver t he fi ne road way .•>; j ml th (.oviiia iia-i a!.-.o it-, ful Auto (^Hib with it., -iixty-stvt-u au Covina \'alley Farmers' t.iub. do voted \<j n'.rti'.ultural and pu blic i n t'-i •• •>' • quota of fraternal organizations. C.'o'/ina rauks a -, 'ne le idin^ orange diM ri'-.t of I,'/-, A ;i^eU-i C'/u nt y. I'.Ie ven . '.mplelely equipp-d packing houses ar-.- re<)uire<1 tv jirepare for market ti.e thou-.ands of i arl^ad-i of or.in^'-s whi. 'n ar.. nhip- j.ed from trnsp'/int annually to the eastern markets. In ai.i.u.il shipm<-i. ' s C<.vin,i ranks tn-,t in 1, 01 couiity and third in the world. 'I rie raising </t li:m.,:is i-% ai-.-j a leadir.^ industry. JlvViOt-i citrus products. (teeidu'jUs fruit-, ai d nerries or evef - } kin<. a i e H i '<,•'• r; in abun'lai.i.e. AJJI i'.ultural cUs and grains j^rov/n on landaaoulnwcat oi tiie city a!-->o form a i-:a'.ing »ourc<; of income. Wliy not buv your MILL FEED where you'jrct the best Tor the least money? We make a specialty of Rolled always fresh of the most approved brands, tested by years of experience by poultry fanciers. MlgH Oreide Rertillzers sold on unit basis. You pay for what you ^et and t>-et what you pay for. Deliveries made to all parts of the valley. San Gabriel Valley Milling Co. Feel Bad To Day? How's your stomach? Sour—weak—nervous—shaky? Bad taste? Last night's dinner didn't agree? Well, just step over to the drug store and get a bottle of Kodol For Indigestion and Dyspepsia Take a good, liberal dose, and you will be surprised how good it will make you feel. Kodol makes weak stomachs strong. Kodol is pleasant and palatable. Kodol digests all the food you eat. Keeps the Stomach Sweet POMONA STEAM LAUNDRY !f you want tin: MKST U'OKK at (lie MOST KEAS< >X AHI/E I'KMCES give 11,1 a trial. TWENTY YEARS' experience has taught us the CHEAPEST and I'.EST way lo do your laundry. With first-class equipment our work und oiir..melliod.s arc sanitary and up-to-date. Leave Bundles at McLeod's Restaurant NMEEK BROS FOR SALE 5000 Acres of choice orange, fruit and farming 1 LANDS in the celebrated San Joaquin Valley On main line of railn<;nl ami in-ar ^ui,d town,. 1'h-nty n\ wiitcr can !/•• ol.t.a in,-i|. Thi , land . 1.111- priscs some of the !/<•-,I in the v.ilh-\- ;mtl vu'jj |,i- MI!I- dividi-d into small tr;t«:t ••, \>, -,uil piir.-ha-.-r-, and sold at low prir.i-s mi t-a->y tcinii. Weekly Excursions to view Land J. M. MATTHEWS KI-AL LSI All- Sole District Agent A . >•(:•..(

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