Covina Argus from Covina, California on June 13, 1908 · Page 3
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Covina Argus from Covina, California · Page 3

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Covina, California
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Saturday, June 13, 1908
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Page 3
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WHEN THEM DIES And When Our Other Planets and Our Sun Arc Also Dead. CT;LL THE HEAVENS BLAZE. 1.1C !i is TT;. • In Y. 111. n.::!,..] by t '!),' C Wi'l'll". i('!l aec'lj'di tions of llui The Infinite Space Shall Always B* Filled With Suns and Worlds and Souls, For In Eternity There Can Be Neither Beginning Nor End. w:ts (lend. The other dici!, <>!!(• :iftcr the other. as extinct, but the stars \v inkling. There shall all's ;'inl worlds, iineiisunihlc eternity time, .••em i;;!!y relative. Is deter- .lie movement of each of s. Mild in each world It Is ng to the personal sensa- inhabitants. Each globe r.'('.:sn:cs its proper period of time. 'j he years of the earth are not those of Neptune. -Neptune's year equals 104 ••f <iv.tr, ar.il is no longer In the abso- Juie. Then 1 exists no proper common n:e,".:'.nre of lime and eternity. In th.' ciapt.v space time does not exist. There are no years, no centuries, but there is a way of measuring time upon a revolving globe. Without periodical movements one can have uo conception of lime whatsoever. The earth existed no longer; neither did its celestial neighbor, Mars, nor he.-.ntiful Venus, nor the gigantic Jupiter, nor the strange universe of Saturn, its rings gone, nor the slow planets Uranus and Neptuno, nor even the sublime sun, whose rays had for centuries made fertile the celestial countries suspended in Its light. The sun was a black globe, the planets were other black globes, and this invisible system continued to course In the starred immensity at the bosom of the cold darkness of space. From the viewpoint of life all those •worlds were dead, existed no longer. They survived their antique history as do the ruins of the dead cities of Assyria, which the archaeologist discovers in the desert and revolved dark In the Invisible and unknown. Everything was covered with ice, 273 degrees below zero. No genius, so sage, could have brought back the days of old when earth sailed through space bathed In light, its beautiful green meadows awakening with the rays of the morning sun. Its rivers flowing like serpents through the green fields, its •woods reverberating with the songs of the birds. Its forests enveloped In majestic mystery. Then all this happiness seemed eternal. What has become of the mornings and evenings, the flowers and the lovers, the harmonies and. joys, the beauties and t'he dreams? All have disappeared. The earth Is dead, all the planets are dead, the sun !s extinct. The solar system gone. Time Itself even annhl- lated. Time flows Into eternity, but eternity remains, and time revives. Before the earth existed, (luring a whole eternity, there were suns and worlds, humanities filled with life and activity as are we today. For millions and millions of years our earth did not exist, but the univer.se was no less brilliant. After our time It will be as before. Our epoch ix of no Importance. The dead and cold earth carried in itself, however, an energy not lost, its movement around the sun, which energy transformed Into heat would suffice to melt the whole globe, to reduce It to vapor and to begin a new history for it, which, it Is true, would not last long, for If this movement around the Kim should suddenly cease the earth would fall into (lie sun and cease to exist. It would rush toward it with ever increasing speed and would reach Jl in sixly-l'u'e days. When tin. 1 earth is dead, other world:* will ci)i!ie. 'I here will be other human- i'ic.'i, other Kabyl.iiiians, oilier Thehe- lans. other Athenians, other Koine-", other I'arl-'e-i, oilier palaces, oilier temple.-,, other glories, other love ;, other lights. And the-«- new universes will disappear in their turn, to l/c followed by still others. At a certain time fat it\\ ay in the future eternity ail the st.-gs of the .Milky Way shall r.i-h toward i/:n> center of gravity and form toriiiidalilc sun. center of wh.ise eniiraioiis worlds 1 populated by beings liv- I Ing in ii temperature which would seera j red hot to us-. | The infinite space shall always be 1 filled with worlds and stars, souls and | suns, and eternity shall last forever, i for there can lie neither beginning nor i end.- Cainille Flainiuarion. I Cut His Visit Short. The !>ul:e of Wellington (dies? wrote to I>r. Iluttoa for information as to the scientific acejiiiremeiits of a voting | otlicer who bad l>cen under his instnic- j tiun. The doctor thought lie could not do less than answer the question verbally and made an appointment accordingly. IMrtctly Wellington, saw Lini lie Baiil: "I am obliged to you. doctor, for the trout/It- you are taking. Is fit foi f -"tht post?" I'luuring bis throat, I)r. Hutton began: "No man more so, my lord. I can"-"That's quite .surlieieii;." said Wellington "I k:i!j\v 'low valuable- your tin.e i.-,. Mit>e just now is equally s... 1 will uot ikruin y-j-.i any longer. <;<r..d litui aiil..'. 1 an im.'Kcusi H system, sh;:!l bceon COVINA "A City Among the Orange Groves'' E above were the words which fell from the lips of Gov. J. N. Hilled of ('..-ilifomia, when he visited recently this fair tfcm set. in its semi-tropic surroundings. No words more tittiiiff could have been chosen in describiiifr Covina, the chief town of the far-fa-ned San Gabriel . Valloy. Every boulevard ami driveway for miles in every direction is flunked with peerless proves, and the very atmosphere in the early springtime is laden with tht perfume of the orange blossom and the trees laden with the golden ripe fruit. Along these firm, oiled driveways, ornamental vegetation of the common and rarer sorts grows in profusion, and wit.hal are the lovely homes set in spacious grounds, where roses thrive in such varied richness 'that they appear voluptuous even amidst indescribable floral wealth. Sublimely eminent over the landscape that blesses the eye from Covina is the majestic peak of San Antonio and those of lesser altitude, but none tiie less beautiful, of the Sierra Madre range, with their snow crowns shining and sparkling like jewels. Covina has no rival in [,os Angeles county for beai.ry of situation. Enhanced by the markings of civilization, its scenic loveliness, viewed in broad perspective, is hardly surpassed anywhere. There is little danger of incuring any tourist's resentment by advising him to tarry at Covina for more than a casual glance about him. tMany things he will treasure in memory are to be seen in and about the pretty burg. BIKDSEi'E V1UW OF COVINA To the homeseeker Covina extends a standing invitation. The right hand of hospitality i« all ways extended to all worthy people to cast their lots with ours and enjoy the grandeur of mountain the perpetual gladness of vernal life, fruiting and flowering in perennial concert, an atmosphere blending the azotic of mountain tops with the tincture of the s a, the conveniences of civilization, and an opportunity of securing handsome returns for their labors in the cultivation of our groves. Covina was incorporated as a city in 1901, and at once took rank as one of the best governed, cities of California, which position it holds steadfastly. Our population is estimated at 250U. Covina is located twenty-one miles east of Los Angeles in the upper San Gabriel Valley, ft is connected with Los Angeles and other points by the Southern Pacific railroad and the new line of the Pacific Electric, which furnishes hourly service, with a running tiuie of 35 minutes, through many miles of the finest orange groves. The public schools of Covina are the pride of the people and the buildings are constructed after the most approved modern plan. - In all respects thev are up-to-date. Our high-school certified tea are accepted in the leading colleges and universities. East and West. Grammar school graduates accredited in the high schools of California and all other states. The people of Covina are, emphatically, church-goers, and each of the six different churches arc well attended. The Methodist and Baptist denominations are both building new edifices to accommodate their respective congregations, which had outgrown their present church buildings. No saloons exist in the city, and those who desire to raise families amid good social and mora environments find here an ideal community. Covina boasts of a beautiful Carnegie library, built is 1'JO.S, which is largely patronized. An especial feature of the institution is the children's reading room. i. '.. !)''.>'.'•. i) ) jo. xi :n i'ioi,eii., oi j. In tew e, ,n MI in ii I t; - , >".'. -i; n. Si ii t>|i-t n < a!; lorn < a can t here I/.- (ound a people more n n i vei -.a 11 y iiiibii'-'l wi'ii •• .1, jirice ' h u .IP- 'In .'i I i/.'-i,-, ol ('«.vina. 'i /,-• ('ov;uu iloine Telephone ('i/mp.iny o. - c ijji.'i it-, oiv n l/.i • iiii n .' ;i on t •. i iii.-. hi --. a (.0111 j)l i: It- and elle -in; t ser v ice. Su l>v i i i.er -, ha ve I he u ->c uf i. .'er •*! »> p-i .nic->. i n.i.fl';,,,,, i ree r.<, i, n e., t i o i •> wi 111 '. i,e io'.'. n-, of A /1; -, a . I , I end 01 ,i, Sa n li'nnun, ('barter < i i k. I r wiiidii ii.r a nd i'i:.-ir • . '1 ne ( , ,*i r;,i (, .1 , ('oinj);i n ', . a i v/ it lo< a ! in .111 u I ion, f in ni >ti' . ;; .is for bo: h f '.!.•! and ili umi'ia tioii. 'lie- n:i n (1.1 s/rii-i Light a ml I'owe/- ' .onip.i o y Inrni-die, lignt tor (,'i/v in, i pri v-> t«: ho.'l.ei and .ilivet-,, -.•.-n I • i: ./r.- ivei. lighted by a (.oin |/lete -y,tein -,| j ,,, ., nde «:en t li;Mit.-,. 'Ilie(.ovin,i I, i tid and v\'a I-T 1,^0111 ,/a •: v , i HI' roie-.l r/y I i. V,. I (u nt i n /ton . t: ir n i . n . -. I ;,•• . .ii y with a pure .'. .111 i MU j>))l y , r>. !,••.! r,y Ii. {•',. Hunt i nj/tr/ij. t: irni .n> -. I ;,•• < .ii •; with a purr .•. .11 < ut.di-r excellent pre->-.'.;. r. '.Ve nave tw-> ii'iti /n.ii and t•.•.•«. -,.ivim?s hank-,. (Mr -.tores an: </)" !)!>.; h order ami al! leading liiie-h of Im ,ine-~ are r«'pre.->e:it<-d. The Vcii'lonn- i^ a lirst-claii country hoti-l. Our (.lulls arc of ;i ->ocial, literary and musical nalurc. The M'in'lay afternoon Clnt», a ladii--.' literary, federateii organisation, owning a han'lv'tm: club-houv: on »li>- norm-r of Citrii* avenue and Center street; the Fortnightly, a g<:rit)i'iii'an' .•» literary riui>; the An.phion, a iiiusii al orgiiiii/.ation ; airl tho Coviua • 'ounlry Cl.irj. en'.iipped with a .-.uitable and enartiiing t<mliliiig; the San (j.'tliriH Valley A'.Mo Club with ito sixty-seven autos make .fri-'juent delightful run-, over the fi ne road way s; und the Covinii Valley Farmer.-,' Club, devotnl to horiii;u!t;irai and public i n !-':i !••>».•>. Covina ha.i al.io it-> full ijU'»ta of fraternal orga ni/alio;)-. Covina ranks a-, the ienling ora r>;/<: <li-,tri' t t,f 1.*,-, Angelr» <y,imty. Kiev;; •.. miplel i-l y e<| nj (.|/i-d packing hoiis--, are required ;o prepar,: for market the tt.ou->ai.il.-, '// '.aiioad-, of Oranges whieli an. :-,hi|j- ped from thin point ai.Miaiiy to the ca-.tern markets. Iu annual Mhipn.fntn Covin<i ranks fir^t in I,-,-. Angele.s county ..nfl third in the world. 1 he raising of leni' n:t ir. al-.o a leatling indi.^try. fte.tid' 1 * our eivrus [jr«./duu'..-., uei.iduoiis fruii.-. ai d berrieiof every kind an; grown in abundance. Agricultural products 'jiiii grain.-v gro.vn ou iai,(l»-,ot lhvvt.it ol the city ai^o form a leading source of income. FOR Good Orange Land Unimproved, near Covina, also orange groves, 3, 5 and 10 acres, close in, on electric road, suitable for subdivision. J. H. MATTHEWS CO. Sole Agents, Covina KERCKHOFF^CUZNER Mill and Lumber Co, Phones: Home MS; Sunset 25,1 COVINA, CALTO CATALINA Swift Service Via Southern Pacific Last Outward Landing; First Homeward Landing at San Pedro. INQUIRE OF AGENTS D, B, Schcnck, Agent Covina Phone H4 6-31 W. r y . Grifilths A. Warner J. C. Thompson WITKS, WAMIt & THOMPSON Orange Groves, Walnut Orchards, Alfalfa and Walnut Lands. Covii.a and Baldwin Park Lots Selling Agents E, J, (Lucky) Baldwin's Lands Home Phono 1089 Branch Oflice Baldwin Park COVINA, CAL,. Barn Phone 240 R«s. Phone 198 CITY LIVERY STABLES C. F. SMITH, Prop. Feed and Sale Yards in Connection F.-irst ;iri(l (u'litlr Horses, Careful Drivi-rs Stylish Ki/rs \V. I'aclillo St., on the new clrclric line. COVINA, of choice orange, fruit and farming in the celebrated San Joacjuin Valley On niiiin Ititci,| r;iilru;nl ;IIK| ticur JMIHI] tov.'it- I'lcnt_v(<l v.-atci ,;in Id- i/!)i,mi.'ii. Tlii > l.nnl i o [H ivs 'iDllic D| 1 lie i,i J in lip- .. ,i|;i-v ;nnl \', ill he MI! divided into ,in;ill lr;i. t , -I, n ii pin, In ; ei , .UK! -iii !l t )()'// ])(')! r i I )i I e,| , y | r I III ., Weekly I Excursions to view Land J. H. MATTHEWS kliAL l-STATIi Sole District A^ent Citrus A venue Covina, Ca

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