The Courier-Journal from Louisville, Kentucky on May 18, 1965 · Page 16
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The Courier-Journal from Louisville, Kentucky · Page 16

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Louisville, Kentucky
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Tuesday, May 18, 1965
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Page 16
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SECTION 1 16 THE COURIERJOURNAL, LOUISVILLE, KY., TUESDAY MORNING, MAY 13, 196r Businessmen Laud LBJPs Excise Cuts Continued from First Page Immediate reduction from 10 in 7 npr pent in the excise a sookesman said, "We expect tax on new cars. He asked that these proposed excise tax tnat after two additional 1 per reductions will be passed aiong cent cut in 1966 and 1U07, to the consumer." the remaining 5 per cent tax A spokesman for the Elec- on new cars, or about $115 tronics Industry Association on the average car, be made said in Washington that on me n-rrnanent. basis of past performance the jt appeared likely that the chances lor price reaucuons 10 pian to retain naif tne auto the consumer would be very mobiie excise tax would be rrwiH nm nn nf the most contrO' Retailers generally agreed versjai features of the excise that lifting the excise tax leviea tax program. at the retail level on hand- Rep Martha Griffiths, D-bags, luggage, toilet articles, Micn ( immediately announced jewelry and furs would result gne wouid press for complete in lower prices to the con- repeai 0f the automobile tax. sumer. . she is a member of the House Allan Jackson, a vice presi- Ways and Cleans Committee, dent of Saks Fifth Avenue de- Asjde from the automobile partment store in New York, tax tne excise taxes on most said the tax elimination would other expensive products have a "pyramiding effect, tj0ugnt by consumers would be inducing more people to buy repealed outright on July 1. more of everything in stores. propose(i for complete repeal The auto industry had hoped on that date were taxes on all for outright repeal of the 10 electrical, gas and oil appli-per cent tax on new cars. ances; musical instruments; Johnson recommended reduc- phonograph records; cameras; tion gradually to 5 per cent radio and television sets; re-by Jan. 1, 1967. frigerators and freezers; air Donald C. Burdette, regional conditioners, and a number of sales manager for Ford m smaner items. Most of these Kansas City, said he believes are now taxed at 5 per cent and the total amount of the savings a few at 10 per cent, will be passed on to buyers. As promised by the President Johnson asked Congress yes- months ago, the 10 per cent terday to approve the tax cut tax imposed by retailers on cos-"without undue delay." metics and toiletries, jewelry, . furs, luggage and leather goods ' Controversy Begins was also included for repeal He called for a cut of $3.5 this year-billion in two equal stages The proposals include a re- effective this July 1 and next auction Jan. l trom iu per ceni Jan. 1, and further reductions to 3 per cent on local and long of $464 million by 1970. This distance telephone and teletype would bring the total to service. The remainder of this $3,964,000,000. tax would be repealed in 1 per The President proposed an cent stages over the following ' three years. Among the taxes scheduled for outright repeal next year are those on telegraph service, admissions, cabarets, club dues, and on automobile (but not truck) replacement parts and accessories. t4Wl) - . j ssv wf Ultralight Guard On HUH In Dallas Continued from First Page presidential cam- Johnson's paign. Johnson has not been back o.th of off. the- afternoon -ent plane for Washington of Nov. 22, 1963, after Lee Harvey Oswald shot Kennedy. Secret Service, instead of taking him to a commercial plane terminal, drove him across the field to a private plane terminal. There he boarded a 10-passenger govern- Shadow 'So Obvious House Seeking Its Own Level Associated Prtsi Wirephoto A SINKING FEELING was experienced by residents of this house at Cassleberry, Fla., when the ground under it gave way early in the morning. Houses near it were damaged, as the one on the far side with a wall nearly split off. The cave-in was blamed on dry weather, which caused underground caverns to run dry and their walls to collapse. Imbert Junta Rejects U.S. Peace Plan '-Triumphant Neal: 'Back In A Year' Continued from First Page liked, and of course I remember seeing my husband's face." The Dahls and their three children, Ophelia, 1, Theo and Tessa, 8, accompanied by a nurse, Sheena Burt, and an English friend, Angela Kirwan, flew to Washington en route to their home in Great Missen-den, Buckinghamshire, about 30 miles from London. The trip will be broken by a stay with a friend in Washington for a few days. During the news conference Dahl answered many of the questions. He said his wife is recovering faster than the most optimistic of doctors had hoped. Forgets Children's Names "She could walk now without the brace," said Dahl, "but the muscle of her right ankle is still weak so she'll probably wear it another month. "At first her right arm and her right hand were weak, but slowly they have come back so that she can use them. "The doctors consider it all very swift." Dahl said his wife occasionally forgets words "sometimes even the names of her children." "But," he added, "that happens less and less frequently. For some reason, she can carry on a perfect conversation on the telephone, without ever having to grope for a word. "As much as we enjoy America, I think her recovery in England' will be even more rapid. She will be more settled there and where we live it is very quiet." A newsman asked if the news conference had made her nervous. She replied: "No, it has not made me nervous. It has made me strong and happy." Users Taxes Up The cut scheduled to take place this summer would, however, be partially offset by increases in taxes totalling $400 million on highway, airway and inland waterway users. The tax increases would be imposed on deisel fuel, large trucks, tread rubber, air freight, aviation gas and jet fuel, and gasoline used in boats and ships that use the inland waterways system. Administration officials said that if the tax cuts are approved, the federal budget for the coming 1966 fiscal year will shape up like this: Revenues $95.4 billion. Spending $99.7 billion. Deficit $4.3 billion. Johnson said federal revenues will grow, not shrink, as a result of the tax cuts. This, he said, is because excise tax cuts like last year's $11.5 billion income tax reduction "will stimulate total demand in the economy and serve to increase tax production and incomes by far greater amounts than the cost of the tax reduction itself." Still in effect if Johnson's program is approved would be about $11.3 billion in excise taxes. More than $6 billion of this total would come from alcohol and tobacco taxes which he did not ask be re duced. Tons Of Mercury Stolen- Newark, N. J. (UPI) More than 23 tons of mercury, worth $335,000, was stolen from a warehouse during the weekend, it was discovered yesterday. The burglars cut through a lock on the heavy chain link fence and then entered the four-story building through a basement window. Continued from First Page agriculture before the ouster of President Juan Bosch, would serve as president of the Dominican Republic until December, 1966. A successor would then be chosen in a regularly scheduled election, Szulc wrote. Szulc reported that Guzman returned Sunday from a secret trip to Washington and was busy yesterday organizing a government. Asked about the reported Guzman agreement, Caamano said: "I know nothing about this. I cannot answer a purely hypothetical question based on something I know nothing about." Caamano, the rebels' provisional president, also denied he had any contact with Bundy or any other U.S. envoys' but added that a meeting was possible soon. "I want to tell you that I am very optimistic at this time," Caamano said in a statement to newsmen. "I hope that in a few hours there will be a final victory for the constitutionalists and peace in the Dominican government." "The victory I'm talking about," he explained, "is a complete victory in both military and political aspects." This seemed to eliminate any possibility of a coalition government. Imbert said yesterday that the White House mission mentioned the Guzman plan as a possible solution to the three-week-old Dominican conflict. Imbert Raps Guzman "I told them," Imbert said, "that if they wanted to turn the country over to communism we would have no part of it." Imbert described Guzman as a "Bosch puppet." Caamano did not dispute the junta's claims that its forces had advanced five or six blocks in bitter fighting in the northern suburbs in 24 hours. He said the rebels had never set up permanent positions in this area. Some 300 crack troops from the armed forces training center at San Isidro Air Base outside the city joined the battle. Imbert and the junta appeared to turn a deaf ear to mission's peace ap- public part of an Organization period ending Sunday midnight. the U.S. peal. "I made it clear," Imbert added, "we would continue fighting for the same objective even if it meant the American troops would have to be turned against us." He also reminded the Americans, the general added, that the Dominican armed forces "were solidly behind the junta." Imbert said he rejected a call by the OAS truce commission for a cease-fire north of the American supply corridor. He said to do so would give the rebels a chance to regroup and would "defy public opinion" which, he said, favors a clean-up of the area. (In Washington it was learned that the United States has formally promised to make its troops in the Dominican Re- Must A Red Admit It? Supreme Court To Decide Continued from First Page a lower court's ruling that party leaders could not be forced to sign. By signing, the argument goes, they would be ful filling one law but risking pros- was "inland water" the state. This would have given California submerged lands extending more than 50 miles out, past the islands of Catahna, ecution under another which San Clemente and San Miguel, outlaws advocacy of violent That was what Congress in-overthrow of the government. tended to do in the Submerged In another brief order yes- Lands Act jl 1953, dissenting ceedings in Chicago so the owned by for telling him they wanted a change of venue for their clients because they considered the judge biased. Two Test Registry Law The court agreed to consider hearing arguments on whether to halt federal pro- terday the court agreed to hear Justice Hugo Black argued. He arguments next term on an- was joined by Justice William other long-burning issue: Does O. Douglas. a business violate the antitrust laws merely by being big? (Full story on Page 11, Section 2.) In other actions: v The court rejected California's claims to vast submerged oil resources between its southern coast and offshore islands. 50 Miles Of 'Inland Water The 5-2 decision gave California a three-mile belt of submerged land running along its coast and a three-mile belt running around each island. The state had contended that But Justice John Marshall Harlan, for the majority, set rules which coincide with those adopted last September by the 22-nation Convention of Territorial Seas. The United States accepts this as international law. This gives the contested land to the federal government, which has jurisdiction over the continental shelves. Chief Justice Earl Warren, who is from California, and Justice Tom C. Clark, from Texas, did not take part in the decision, which affects both states. The justices reversed, 8-1, the contempt convictions of two Norfolk, Va.. Neero lawyers. the three-mile belt should ex tend out into the Pacific from L. W. Holt and E. A. Dawley. (the far side of these islands They were fined $50 each bv fend that the area between the Circuit Judge Carleton E. Hoi- right against Islands and Southern California laday in Hopewell, Va., in 1952 incrimination. Illinois Supreme Court alone may supervise reapportionment of the state's senate. The Communist Party case involves appeals by William Albertson of Brooklyn, N.Y., and Roscoe Quincy Proctor of Oakland, Calif. The Justice Department said both had been elected members of the Com munist Party's national com mittee and their state Com munist organizations. Albertson was first ordered as an individual to register under the 1950 Subversive Activities Control Act, which says when , the Communist Party does hot register, then the members must register themselves. IH5 joint appeal with Proctor said that theirs is a test case and that 26 other persons had similarly been ordered to register. They all claim a possible self- Shame, James Agent 007 Denounced By Vatican Paper Vatican City MV-The Vatican daily L'Osservatore Romano, yesterday denounced the books featuring secret Agent 007. In a film-page commentary entitled "The James Bond Case," the Vatican newspaper said that hardly a single noted psychologist, sociologist, writer, journalist, literary critic or film critic has failed to speak of Agent 007 and it criticized them for not getting around to moral condemnations of author Ian Fleming's creation. At risk of passing as old- fashioned ... we find ourselves confronted with an authentic contraband of immortality," said the article. It called the Bond films "a dangerous mixture of violence, vulgarity, sadism and sex," and added: "Evil, presented in an alluring manner, has a very strong power of attraction on poor human nature weakened by original sin." Omaha Packer Drops Strike-Bound Plant Omaha iPi The board of directors of the Cudahy Packing Co. yesterday ordered th permanent closing of Cudahy's strike-bound plant here. The order was in a resolution that also specified that the plant be offered for sale or lease. The plant has been closed since April 8 by a dispute between the company and Local 60 of the United Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers Union. The company had contended the dispute was an illegal strike. The union claimed it was a lockout. About 1,100 workers were in volved. Accused Israeli Spy Hanged By Syria Damascus, Syria (UPI) Israeli spy Eliaho Cohen was hanged in the city's main square before dawn today. His execution was witnessed by security police, newsmen and the five-man military court that sentenced) him to death 10 days ago. Cohen, 40, died after recit ing a Hebrew prayer. He wrote a message to his wif and three children, who live in Israel. Cohen, 40, was said to have admitted spying for Israel for three years. Laos Victors Honored Vientiane, Laos W Premier Prince Souvanna Phouma flew yesterday to Dong Hene, 225 miles southeast of Vientiane, and decorated 130 men for their part in a (battle last March in which royal Laotian forces crushed a Communist battalion. of American States OAS po lice force to restore peace. (Ellsworth Bunker, U.S. ambassador to the OAS, made public a letter dated Saturday that offered U.S. "military, naval and air forces presently in the Dominican Republic for the inter-American force set up by the hemispheric organization.) The junta offensive is aimed at wiping out rebel resistance in the largely industrial and slum area of northeastern Santo Domingo. It is estimated that 300 rebels are making last ditch stand against 1,500 junta soldiers. Rebels Get 2 Choices Imbert's forces established a line on the rebels' west and began pushing eastward. This flanking move left the rebels the choice of hiding their guns and trying to pass into the downtown area through a U.S. checkpoint on the east-west corridor or trying to get across the Ozama River and out of the city. U.S. troops patrol the river s west bank. U.S. paratroopers at the checkpoint carefully searched everyone for weapons. They held a dozen young men for questioning. Commodore Francisco J. Rivera Caminero, junta armed forces secretary, said his men had advanced six blocks since Sunday. The drive is proceeding slowly on a straight line to the east, he said, because we re carrying out a house-by-house search for weapons." Rivera Caminero said 11 armored units were in action, with 30 tanks in reserve. Heavy Casualties Reported Families abandoning the area continued to report heavy military and civilian casualties. Some bodies of civilians, including children, had been seen, but confirmation of the numbers was not possible. Meanwhile, action on the U.S. front diminished. A military spokesman reported 40 shooting incidents during the 24-hour 14 Living Iii Isle's Combat Zone Continued from First Page their escort in a jeep. There was sporadic gunfire. The babies remained quiet during the visit. Photographers asked the entire group to move into the patio for pictures. Heavy firing into the abandoned (Union) hotel next door sent everybody scurrying back into the house. Rebel spokesmen said 26 bodies had been taken out of the area since Saturday. Leaving the area, the escort jeep came under heavy fire. The newsmen in their taxi crouched on the floor. The snipers were not visible from the street. There are many rebel soldiers and armed civilians in the area. Women were cooking bananas over a wood stove when we arrived. The children were surprisingly quiet. There was no crying despite the crack and whistle of shots from rifles and machine guns. Some of the children were naked in typical Dominican fashion. A rebel stronghold is about a mile from the house under siege. In this area are 50 to 60 rebels. Even the armed rebels do not venture into the area where the 14 persons are isolated. The besieged group includes a 5-month-old baby and a 55-year-old grandmother. All the cinder-block bungalows in the block are empty except No. J 81, where the 14 people live. Four Americans were reported wounded. In Fort Worth Mrs. Oswald Newsmen Checked, Locked In said a man had followed her in a car when she left her When Humphrey arrived by apartment yesterday morning, commercial airliner the Love Tne damn f00j was s0 Field terminal was being obvious tnat iittle od me MrS-guarded by scores of police Marguerite Oswald, could spot ana aecici syivc "61-""' nim. Reporters were triple-checked for credentials and locked in . "I thought the man was go-a meeting room as Humphrey W to shoot me, or something deplaned. Then they were else. I m a nervous wreck, admitted to a news conference she sai( the man trailed her at which he repeated the for 40 minutes, stopping when administration stand on the sne stopped and often driving Dominican and Vietnamese to wjthin a few feet of her situations, Communist threats car and China's atomic bomb. ' She said she telephoned Like the airport, the Adol- Police chief Cato Hightower, Dhus' Hotel was swarming with whn tniA upr tw fih security men. At one time five uncjer surveillance but would policemen and two Secret not say who gave the order. Service agents were guarding the door to where Humphrey If he had said I was being and the others were eating, watched for my protection it Humphrey had been driven up wouldn't be so bad but an outside ramp to the second- under surveillance ... floor dining room. "I know Humphrey is in Twenty-five policemen on Dallas, and could that be the the ground, two on a roof reason, or have I been under and one in a window across surveillance all the time? the street guarded Humphrey's There's a difference in being exit from the hotel. He smiled protected and being under and waved to several hundred surveillance, people as he rode off in a From tne time president motorcade bristling with shot- Kennedy was "shot, this has Suns. i)een jjg a m0vie serial. So Back at Love Field the asinine, really." 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