Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas on December 21, 1938 · Page 2
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Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas · Page 2

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Hope, Arkansas
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Wednesday, December 21, 1938
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Page 2
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PAGE T.vtfO STAfc, HOPE, ARKANSAS Wednesday, December 21,1088 Star Star of Hope, 1899; Press, 1927. Consolidated January 18, 1929 0 Justice, Deliver Thy Herald From False Report! Published every week-day afternoon by Star Publishing Co., Inc. C. E, Palmer & Alex. M. Washburn, at The Star building, 212-214 South Walnut street, Hope, Ark. C. E. PALMER, President ALEX. M. WASHBURN. Editor and Publisher (A'P) —Means Associated Press. (NEA)—Means Newspaper Eneterprise Ass'n. ' Subscription Rate (Always Payable in Advance): By city carrier, per week 15c; per month 63c; one year $6.50. By mail, in Hcmpstead, Nevada, Howard, MiUer and LaFayette counties, $3.50 per year; elsewhere $6.50. Member of The Associated Press: The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or hot otherwise credited in this paper and also the local news published herein. M. Reg. tf, 8. Pal. Off. By UR. MORRIS tlSHBEIN Editor, Journal of the American Medical Association, and of Hygoia, the Health Magazine Get Famaliar With These Warnings to Avoid Killer Carbon Monoxide Charges on Tributes, Etc.: Charge will be made for all tributes, cards Ot thanks, resolutions, or memorials, concerning the departed. Commercial newspapers hold to this policy in the news columns to protect their readers from a deluge of space-taking memorials. The Star disclaims responsibility or the safe-keeping or return of any Unsolicited manuscripts. T _ .. . _!_ .... - - -... . - - ----.•_—j. —m-r.-iL _r-»in i -,_ — - _i i, n — j • *-^. - Blood-Language Rule Leads to Absurity If. you remember the geometry you studied in high school, you may recall a stunt which went under the high-sounding title of "reductio ad absitrdum." The idea was that if you had a theory to test, and suspected that there was something wrong with it, you selected the dizziest example you could think .of and carried it to its logical conclusion. Then, when you had a thoroughly ' cockeyed situation on your hands, you proved that the theory itself was vphony. You did this by reducing it to absurdity—"reducto ad absurclum." For a long time now the theory that remote ties of ancestry and language should determine a people's government has been widely held. It led to •-much map-making at the Cersailles conference, nnd more recently it gave Herr Hitler a fine excuse for pushing his drive to the east. Now the Italians have picked it up. looking toward expansion in the direction of Tunisia and Corsica: and it begins to look as if the old high school process of reductio ad absurdum had set in. ' it may be quite true that the bulk of the Tunisians and Corsicans are eithei of Italian ancestry or speak with a pronounced Italian accent. But if that means that those territories should immediately go under the Italian flag, "then Uncle Sam himself is sitting on a lot of^subject peoples who are under the wrong flag. Ey that theory the Dutch ought to reclaim n good part of Pennsylvania, and Spain should take over large portions of Arizona and New'Mexico. „ Sweden would get a large area in Minnesota and the Dakotas, and by right of discovery and settlement should be entitled tc part of New Jersey. The French would' , have a respectable claim to New Orleans, and Italy coull lay claim to a good bit of land along Long Island Sound. Poland could reclaim many city blocks : in. Chicago and Germany could assert title to much of St. Louis and Cin. cinnati. New York City would be split about 30 ways, considerable territory in the west would go back to the Indians, and Japan would get Hawaii. All of this is pretty absurd, of course. Yet it follows quite logically, once you accept the premise that remote ties of blood and language are all-important. And if logical adherence to that theory leads to absurdity in this country, perhaps the same thing is true elsewhere. The plain fact is that this blood-end-language business has been over- Worked to an amazing dtgree. There are far more important considerations to be applied in determining national boundaries, and it is high time the fact was realized. There have been so many migrations and so much shifting and intermingl- ir.g.of peoples that the map can nevei be unscrambled and peace can never be attained on a blood-and-language basis. As long as that is the accepted shibboleth there will be wars and rumors of wars. The world's hope for peace ' depends on recognition of the fact that some saner and more practical means of determining who shall rule whom must be found. Third ot n scrls of five articles i on carbon (tnoxlde nnd luw to n- void It Since mbst of the deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning occur in garages or in factories .or in mines wher.e numbers of men may be exposed to the gas at one time, the health sections of the various labor departments and of various industries have worked out a series of recommendations to be followed whenever one or more persons suddenly become unconsious as a result of exposure to carbon monoxide gas. It might well be in every factory where this possibly exists, in the gas in steel mills, celluloid manufacturers, acetylene welding, brass foundries, garages and service stations, and indeed in every home where illuminating gas is used, that the following eight warnings be familiar: 1. If there is a yellow flame heating your machine report this fact at once." There should be a blue flame at all times. A yellow flame gives off carbon-monoxide. 2. Never use n gas-h r .atod npoliun.io which is eonncted by flexible rubber or metal U'bing. The only flexible tubing v/hish does not lenk is an approved ••loth-covered tubing. 3. Do you suppose thr.t you can fine aleak in your tubing by running .1 lighted match along it? It will ligh only when there is a very large leak. There may be many small leaks whicl make it dangerous to Work at your achine, even t hough those places cln od not permit enough gas to go through t« actually light when you apply a match. 4. When you are working over an open flame, do not put any utensil on the fire which covers the 'flame too completely. This keeps the air out, and increases the amount of carbon monoxide gas produced. ' 5. Do not try to patch a leak or make any adjustments yourself. Close off thhe gas till the repair man comes. G. If the gas presure changes report the fact at once. If there is too large pressure, the gas will not burn properly and will give off considerable carbon monoxide gas. there is too little pressure some of the port holes in your appliance may not Ight. This will happen particularly f they are dirty, and filled with soot. Those port holes which do not light eak a certain amount of Ras. and inure your health. 7. If i'ou find that you get n head- iclie at your work, carbon monovldc nny be present in the air. Look for leaks nnd poor connections. 8. If you are not feeling well see \ doctor' right away. If you get n icadace at work due to gas, try some other kind of work. A Book a Day By Brut* Tlic Screwy Slrtc or [tiur.Tur If you tun imagine n book which is like n blend of "You can't Tnkp It With You" nrul "Merrily We Live." with fnint overtones of ''1 tie Thin ivinn, • you can got some itlcn of Robert George Denn'S new murder mystery, "A Murder .of Convenience" (Crime Club: $2). Mr. Demi discusses the slaying of an elderly capitalist, mid shows us two tough private detectives circulatinK among the deceased's family in the hope of solving the crime; but only incidental to his portrayn! of one of llio screwiest families in current fiction. Between father, who spends his time in the basement fighting tbeb World War on a large-scale relief cin emigre chauf-ptheRu.ssiannaiwIim map. nnd the Russian emigre chauffeur who gaily insults everyone in the household, the family is both im- probable and comic; nnd while the boo kamounts to little nsn mystery yarn It does make highly amusing reading in other respects. If straight mystery fare is what you seek, try "The D.A. Holds a Candle." by Erie Stanley Gardner (Morrow S2>. The imlL'taliguble Mr. Gardner /Irops Perry Mason temporarily to stiow a small town district attorney denning up a mess which falls in his lap when a hitch-hiker is found dead in n tourist camp. As in all of this author's book's, the action is fast and the plot i.s skillfully construct- . cd. All in all. here's u first-rate thriller for a winter evening. Al«o recommended is "Then There Were Thr'w." by Geoffrey Homes (Morrow. S2). In this due a private ilick and a newspaper editor unravel one of the neatest try-and-fiml-the- bocly mysteries yet encountered. this reviewer has This private dick, Ij.V the way . is n salty and refreshing I'lij'.nick'i-; Mr. Homes ivuiUI do worse than put him in (mother book. WAR If you've declare^ W ar against some of Lho.so ofUls-uml-cncls that tin; clottering up your home, it's time to do simething about it. A llopo Slav Want Ad will fight the battle for you—and win ! It pets rc-rt tilts .font and very 'cheaply! , .,.,>,, • Send Your Clmtnijtcd Ad (>!/ Moil or 13 Hit a to 'Hope OUR BOARDING HOUSE ...with... MAJOR HOOPLE OUT OUR WAY By J. R. WILLIAMS For Sale FOR SALE—7 week old pigs. 3 months old pigs. Male Hog Service. Bill Ramsey. 2I-3tp FOR SALE — Holiday Specials — Shampoo Set and Dry 35c; Oil Shampoo and Set Dry 65c; Manicure 35e; Eye Brow, Lash ,Dye and Arch 50c; Cocktail Facial 50. Stuart's Beauty Salon, Phone 752. Jan 7 Pd. . FOR SALE—Steinway Grand, slightly used, Big Saving, Home size, almost perfect condition. Beasley's, Texarkana. 13-to-24 Lost LOST: One bay pony-mare 6 years old, about 750 pounds, good shape, and one black mare mule, about 10 years eld 1000 Ibs. Strayed from farm near . McNab. ' Reward offered. W. F. Gilbert, Washington. 20-3tp • "The More You Tell the Quicker You Sell" • ',., : ^ , :r,?L Ypu^Qan Talk to Only One,Mui&, , .. . , , •'- Want Ads Talk to ' Thousands SELL-RENT BUY OR SWAP All Want Ads cash in advance Not taken over the Phone One time-2c word, minimum 30c Three limes-3%c word, minimum SQc Six times—6c word, minimum 90s One month—18c word, minimum 52.70 Rates are for continuous insertions only. Notice ~~~ NOTICE—Specials. Guaranteed Oil Permanents §1.50 and up; Shampoo, Set and Dry 50c; Lash and Brow Dye 40c. White Way Beauty Shop, 119 Front Street. IM-Dec-30c PIONEER FLYER HORIZONTAL 1 Charles , American air hero. 9 He made the solo Atlantic flight. 14 State of political disorder. 15 Studio. 17 Resembling ore. 18 Keno. 20 To cut off. 21 Conjunction. ' 22 Those who pity. 24 Twitching. 26 Common verb. 27 Tanner's vessel. 28 Dye. 30 Sound of pleasure. 31 Metal string. '•/.'. To contend. 34 Manifest. y, Yellow 36 Sand hill. 38 To chatter. 39 Doctor. (Answer to Previous Puzzle) 43 Postscript. 44 And. 46 Entertains. 51 Musical note. 52 Wings. 54 Royal. 55 Caterpillar hair. 571760 yards (Pi-). 59 Portuguese coin. 60 Quantity of yarn. 61 He received world-wide for this 16 Rocky pinnacle. 19 Seventh musical .note. 21 He is living . at present. 22 Colleague. 23 Barbarians, 25 He new air routes. |p-J 27 Poison of a disease. 29 Lagoon. VERTICAL 31 Married. 1 Note in scale. 33 To recede. 2 To unite. 37 Pitcher, oo-i j 40Smal 3 Sp.kenard. m ernoria , 4 And - 43 Inner court. 5 Before Christ 45 Powder 6 Phosphate of ingredient copper. 7 Peasant. 8 To abhor. 9 Symbol for iron. iOSick. 11 Public feat. 41 To embroider 62 His wife is 42 Half an em. now his disturbance. 12 Brown pigment. 13 Transposed 47 Microbe. 48 Epoch. 49 Secular. 50 Ell. 5J To toucn. 52 Wine vessel. 53 Snaky fish. 55 Snow glider. .56 Insect 58 South America. 60 Spain. .Services Offered SPECIALS — Permanents $1.50 Shampoo set, Manicure 85c; Shampoo set, Eyebrow-lash dye ?1.00. Vanity Beauty Shop. Phone 39, 117 Front Street. * 21-26-c Today's Answers to CRANIUM CRACKERS Questions on Page One 1. Fclse. A trek is a journey or migration. 2. True. Mussolini wns a pacifist as a young man. . • . • • \ i'. False. A symposium is a collection of opinions, ideals, writings, etc. 4. False. Semantics is the science of communication. 5. False. Pennyfields is a street in Lirnehouse, London. It appears the Illinois athletic board was trying tu schedule a game for Bob Zuppke in the Soup bowl. The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse are riding again to add to the troubles of the bookmaker. Munitions smuggled out of Pilsen, Czechoslovakia, are sometimes labeled as food and beverages. Skoda pop? Only society women can make a tree ;.n international issue. For the benefit of foreign spies it is here recorded that the CCC groups in California are busy fighting blister rust on gooseberry bushes. Edmund Breese seems a natural choice for the lead in "Gone With the Wind." Cheering news for the man of the house who always gets stogies for Christmas is the announcement of a new odorless cabbage. The fact the Chinese eat lots of spinach seems hardly worth passing along to Junior just now. Song writers say there will be no war at this time. You can't march to Flat Foot Floogie or get mad over a missing basket. Jimmy Roosevelt's qualifications for work in Hollywood seem to be that he flunked languages in Harvard. Houses Went Cheap LIVERPOOL, Eng.—(/f J i—There was only one bid when two houses were put at auction in Liverpool. They were knocked down for $2.50 apiece. Reason—the houses are scheduled for demolition. THREE DOLLARS FOR PATRIARCHAL AMD PECREPlT MOTOR? MY WORP, HER/MAM .' REMEMBER THIS IS TO BE USED "FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH, AND SUCH A PROHIBITIVE PRICE MIGHT DEPRIVE Me OF THE OPPORTUNITY TO CARRY ON EXPERIMEMTS A, MOST REMARKABLE INVENTION .' HOW ABOUT FlPTY CENTS 2 FlPTY CENTS/ A-CH, T ASA A SANTA C LA, US, YAH? X SHOULD RUIN AAY BUSINESS FOR VOT YOU CALL, THIS INVHNITIOM / • X TELu YOU VOT—-FOR UCBODY ELSB VOULD 1 CO IT--*- YOU QIP ME TWO COLLARS, UKJD 1 T5LL YOU HONESTLY AT DOT PRICE I LOSE MONEY t TRY IT XOURSEUF ONCE TRY eiTTIN' OUT OF A CAR WITH A ARMFUL OF BUNDLES: DOM'T CRITICIZE TILLYOU -TRY IT S'OURSELVES PAYS TOP PRICE FOR EVERYTHIWG=\ WHY MOTHERS GET GRKY COPR. HM BY NEA SERVICE. INC. T. M. REO. U. S. PAT. OFF. By EDGAR MARTIN This Is Different BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES WtVX. .V.OOT'b PEACE T.O HER £>HE'<b Mi'aT.P'.VOe.Vi '. By ROY CRANE Oh, Oh! Dirty Work Ahead ALLEY OOP WHEW I THIMKA WHAT I'M GOMNIA •DO, 1 JUS' GOTTA BUST EIGHT OUT LAFF-IKJ.' CAW YA IMAGIME TH 1 NERVE ) 1 POW'T GUESS HE I'LL 5HOVV SOME FOLKS THEY CAN'T PUT STUFF OV/EE. OLD MAN) OOP.' / WELL, BY I GUM, I'LL— / I'VE GOT OF THAT <3UV--VISVTIM' OOOL.A AFTER ME TELLIM' HIM WHAT'D HAPPEXJ TO TCOK YOU VERY SERIOUSLY —AND NEITHEE "DID QOOLA- HOW SHE'S THEOWIM' A PAR.T-/ FOR, HIWi T. M. REC. U. S. PAT. Of r.. COPR. 1939 BY NC» SERVICE. INC. By V. T. HAMLIN An Inspiration WASH TUBES CAPWAt \S ALMOST SURROUWPer 1 . PRICES SOAR. FODPER FOE THE CAVAV.BV BECOKSEi 5CAECE. WHOA 1 . I 60T WWAT WAMY,$6MOR, ^RE MAPE WITH 5PRIN&S AMD KAPOK, OR HAlR. OURS -POOF!REVOLUTION, CANWOT HOPE BEEAK! THEM.SINCE WE CAM'T SELL OUR , VNE'U. SELLTH'STUFftM' F3JHE REvOLUTlOW SPREADS LIKE WU>FtR£, U TOVOVi AFTEE TOWN FW.V5 WTO EEBEl. HA.VTCS. FRECKLES AND HIS_FRIENDS IT'S A LOWS STORY Sounds Like Great Fun By MERRILL BLOSSER DUD v^ YOU SAY Y YOU'RE WANGLE , A QUY 1 KMOW, RESK3MINQ? KEEPS CALLING IN ORDERS WHY ? / AND I HAVE TC3 DELIVER THEM / ' „,—-( THEY'RE PRESENTS FOR MY GIRL I -f/^ HE CALLS BACK. AND HAS ME GO CLEAR OUT TO «IN0Srtt>N ON FOOT To BRING THEM BACK.' ITS HAPPENED SIX. TIMES ! TODAY Me CALLED AGAIN ' MYRA NORTH, SPECIAL NURSE I GRABBED I PHONE BEFORE MISS SHANKS COULD STOP ME AND GAVE HIM THE BIRD i So I'M QUITTIN© BEFORE TOO FIRE ME FOR INSULTING A CUSTpMER / / MY BOY, IP WANGLE IS THAT KINO OF A HEEL, TEACH ME HOW TO MAKH THAT SOUND, AND I'LL CALL HIM UP MYSELF/ On the Spot By Ray Thompson and Charles. Coll Guy/ TELL ME QUICKLY - WHO DID ) VOU SEE COMINCb ' ' OUT OF THAT 'TX3VES PEACE" MEETIIOS WOW WAIT, YOU'VE GOT ME .ALL WROKje>.' 1-1 WAI^J'i TO JOIH l)P WITH VOUR. PEACE SOCJ5TY/ HE'S HUMS UP/ WELL, PCtit-iAPS &UY'S A SMART EH. DETECTIVE THAM I THOUGHT

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