Iola Daily Register And Evening News from Iola, Kansas on July 4, 1903 · Page 2
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Iola Daily Register And Evening News from Iola, Kansas · Page 2

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Iola, Kansas
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Saturday, July 4, 1903
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Page 2
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THE lOLA DAILY REGi^EEB, SATUKPAY, JULY- 4 1903 is- AN UNEQUALEp HOME S Within a few ^inut^s' ride of lola, LaHarpe or Gas City, and about threel bloqks to ne^ ^em^nt pi^t. Fresh: air; healthful surroundings, rapid transit and gas niake it the most h oj0<e^ in JUlen county. gsr TOI^WS:—Prices are from $70 to ^106 per lot. Lots are 50x150. $5.00 down and $5.60 a month. Location:—Electric l|iite on tlie soutli. Dffice at Terminus Electric line desirapt>le iQcation for loia public road on the north and Just half way between Qas City and LaHarpe Write or call on IdLA DAILY REGISTER TELEJI^HONB NO 18. CHA8. F. 8COTT. BUBSCB^PTION BATES: One week - -| -. - Ten Centa One Month One Forty-four Cents Five DoUars and Twenty Uts «Dtei«a at lola,; Kansas. PostofBco as Second I Class -. Matter. - AdvertMns ratc^ made known on application. THE FOURTH OF JULY. (Contributea by L. P. H.) At the. Wortd's Fair -in Chicago in 1893 no object attracted more atts:i- Uon than the old "Liberty Bell." Amons a group of reverent on-lookers on a certain day. a man from one of the western states took his stand. He yms past middle life and his general appearance indicated that he was a •working man, perhaps a farmer. He lodked to be a man of more than average intelligence. He removed his hat and stood for a few moments in silence. Then he spoke as though^for the mere satii^faction of expressing his deep feelings: "For forty years it has been one of the dreams of my life to see the'old 'Liberty Be)!,' and here It is." Tears began streaming from his eyes and his very- frame shook wit^ emotion. American patriotism is deeper and stronger than it has (Axr been. We are only coming to realize , what 1 the word "Fatherland" means. It took a century for us to get rid of the fcel- psople. We are coming jto have universal Americans, in whose lives is being reflected the whole history of the whole nation. Sectional men are becoming fewer and liss marked; national men are becoming more numerous and more American. It has been often remarked., that although President Roosevelt is a New Yorker he is as much a Westerner as he is an' Easterner. . ,^ ! • The Fourth oif July is the tjTiical American national holiday^ It commemorates in the. first place the final and formal adoption of the Declaration of Independence. On' this day wo delight to recall the no|ile band of heroes who assembled in the old State House in' Philadelphia anil dared subscribe .their names to ^ii document which meant a formal declaration of war by thirteen weak a'n!d struggling colonies in the •ft -ildernesEJ against the then mightiest nation on the earth. The President of the Continental Congress, John'Hancock, headed the- list with his name written in such bold characters that "the King of England could read without speciacles." All the others followed while Benjamin Franklin remarked that if they didn't all hang together they {would hang separately. The declaration was pub^ li ;hed, the "Liberty Bell" rang out the glad news, the people rejoiced, and.as the tidings spread over [he colonies tens of thousands of patriots dedicated their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor to the cause of civil liberty. I But the Fourth of July has come to be fraught with a broader and deeper There are ; two truths in^ that we wore a product, a ^cn-i i especially which ought to bo associat- sioner of other! countries. Fordign standards, foreign materials, foreign schools, foreign literature, foreign statecraft were looked ijpon as our models, and Europe was looked upon as our chief source. America was on ,ly an adopted homo; there wore many fatherlands. But the time h^^s come, the generation has been born a!ud rear<|d when men say without reserve and with deep emotion, "America is our Fatherland." We are a source; wo have our own distinctive life; we have a history. This spirit is being manifested in almost every department of our life. We 86$ it in our great business enter prises, in our attitude as a nation toward other nations, in our educational methods and institutions, in our new national literature, in the equipment and conduct of our army .and navy, and above ail in the character of our "Maf jrbor mjrem, open jrenf maath MNf MW mOui luck win brtagyoti." The mother smiles at the childish game, and doesn't realize that it is a game she as a. woman has perhaps played for a great many years. Many a woman i^ w^k and sick, nervons and discom:aged. She sofFers fixim headache, backadie and other ills. She wants to be well, but all she does is ito shut her eyes i and open her mouth;for medicine and^ trust to luck for results* I She "doctors" 'month after month, often 'year after year, \tn this same blind.hap-hazard fashion, and re* ; ceives no perma* nent benefit Women take Dr. Pierce's Favorite Prescription with their eyes open to the feet that it ctxreslwoDunfy ills. It cures irregularity. It 4ries debilitating dmina. It heals inQaranutioD and ulceration and cures fiemale weakness. There is no trustiDg: to luck by those who use l«Favorijtc Presciiiption." " My dUefuewM displacement and ulcrrntlon of the utcnu, and IJWM in a tcrrilile condition «rlth pain and wcnkncM and had given up all hopes oT ever belt K well affaiii." writes Mrs. Harry Aj Brown, 6i Orouo. Penobscot Co.. Me. •HM doctored with four different doctors within fiwr months, and instead of geltiUK better was growinsr weaicer aU the time. I decided to toy your * Favorite Prescription.' 'Golden Med- kU>I)tscovny,v«nd 'feasant FeileU' as I had —' -'"-L 'aires resulting from their - tiles and fidt somoch bct- ^ that I kttton untlllam by We, and to Dr. Pierce all beuif of U»! manjr [jicninot say cnooKb in favor I b^gan taking ' u vteD as :-cver la tbepniaeisfdse. of gs.airfWws Before I began taking yonr medicUesZ; only. webbed one bnndred^ and tmt^trpaaadi:^ 1 aiw wei ^poe biiwlred afaii^ SinBJiek.; ^^(id ^6rty pO^ In six ——ao mofB with :lKWie Story of Missouri's Shame. The record of the Legislature in nearly every state in the Union has been blackened at some time in its ihistory by bribery or attempted bril)- ^ery in the interest of certain measures before it. Hardly any Legislature of recent years is capable of showing a ciean record in this regard, so great is the pressure of the modern combines and corporations upon the lawmakers of the country. Probably the most appalling showing ever made in the may of. legislative venality, however, is that uncovered by Circuit Attorney Folk of St. Louis which tells the story of Missouri's shame. From punishing the boodlers of St. Louis Prt)secutor Yftlk tiirneJ his attention to the corrupt Legislators in the general assembly of the state. As a result of the investigation and trials already conducted the circuit attorney has uncovered a story of venality that is certain to arrest the attention of the ent.'re country. He hais published a tabic of the amounts received or demanded for various matters of Ipgislation which contains the following items: St. Louis Transit Co (consolidation bill) ?15.0,(K)0 Royal Baking Powder Co, (alum bill) Paid American Book Co Paid Sugar trust Paid American Tobacco Co, (cigarette bill) Paid Insurance interests ( anti-trust law) 40,000 Whisky interests (bill taxing whisky) Paid Kansas iCity stockyards (bill regulating charges 15,000 Audubon society's bill ..; 1,500 •Brewers' interests (beer bill) 10,000 Coal oil inspection bill .. .Paid SOO *St. Louis excise bill 2;500 St. Louis county excise bill,.. . 500 St. Louis county road law ... 5,000 Slot machine bills 15.000 County warrant bill 7,,=)00 Chattel mortgage bill 3,500 25,000 20,000 10,000 5,000 10,000 CRYSTAL ICE Supplied to the Trade Direct at the factory or from our delivery wagons. All delivery wagons have our name on them. lola Ice & Cold Storage Co. PliANK RIODLB. Mgr. Phone 116. Factory oo West Strset. We Want to Figure That i ! PLUMBING JOB For You. Satisfaction , Guaranteed. AttheMi^LS T. Depot I ^la, Kansv Jtfne to, 1903. To tli'e people, of lola and Allen Coonty: The ondersigned "Litmhet [.Comjpany bas opened up a yafd on north Jefferson aVentte, adjoining the M. the Declara faintly the the making cd with it in the mind and heart of every American. The first of these is the study of the history of our'nation. Tlic nation that would become great must know well her own history. America recognizes this fact. Our expositions, monuments, and memorials call attention to it. Our artists are working out a national symbolism. Our writers of fiction are: putting life and color and reality into •historical events and personalities. \ Better liis- tories are being written, j Biographies arc being written and read more ex tenslvcly. We are coming to understand the philosophy of our history. AU this goes to show tha^t one of the truths that the Fourth of July stands for is-thoroughly permeatjing the people. The other truth that is closely as .sociatcd with the celebration of the Fourth of July is that w<^ are making history. The signers of tion comprehended but part they were playing in of the world's history; jet their act has come to be Recognized as one of the epoch making events How accurately every dejed has been recorded! How carefully every word is preserved! How minutely every motive is being studied? How much it all had to do with the making of American history and thje destiny oJ the whbl; race! We are! making history just as truly as thejy. Our acta will bb recorded, our wprds remembered, oiir motives analyzed, and all shall go |to the making of the history of our tiine as truly asj^as the case in the diys of the Araarlcan Revolu tion. O, the honor, the dignity, the oiiportunlty .of America a statesman Hhip, of ciilzcnshlp! ; { The study of bIa(ory, jlJC making of history, these go togctl^clr in the advancement of a great nation. The one tends to make us reverent and atab|c, the other practical and progressive. The one deepens our o notions, the other keeps us young, Kevcronco for the past is necessary for true ficalthy growth. Earnest dovotloa to present duty isjthe highest honor we can pay to the makers and builders of our lia tion. It is this idea, 11 at underlije^ Linpoln's famous Gettysmrg speech^ which is the greatest F( urth of July oration that has ever been spoken. Total demanded ?S21.300 *Not known that above was paid, but believed to have been. In addition to the above sum of 1321,300, which it has been shown that Legislators demanded for the passage or defeat of certain measures pending in the assembly statistics show, according to Mr. Folk, that the Legislators received in cash bribes the sum of $220,800. These revelations, it must be borne in mind, do not include all the instances of corruption in the session of the Legi.';Iaturc. Evidence pertaining to all the charges of bribery Is not yet complete. The story demonstrates the necessity for constant vigilance on the part of Uie people in the election of men to law-making bodies.—Chicago Record-Herald. Agency For the OLIVER TYPEWRITERS At other Makes Cleaned and Repaired \ I \ * t « » » P • • MALT and HOP TONIC ON ICE AT I* m m * I I m m m m m 9 9 m « m •^v•:"X -:•-^•x -:-^•:-H ~:••x -:"^'^•^•H••:-^•:• I J. n. DAVIESi • —- . , • Undertaker <' and <i I Licensed I Embalmer | y. Twenty years experience in the' I> • business. First class work <• *j* guaranteed. '• : East Side of Square, lola 'X. ' Phone 306. 1*1 •:• • K; & T. depot, a complete stock on hand [ at for a share of where yoitf will find? all times. We asfc yout trade and hope to merit the same by fair ^prices and good material Come and see iss an^ get prices txifore yoa fetfy. Yotfrs RespectftjIIy, ...SEE US FOR.. :c5 Swell Tflmouts and Fine Novelty Rigs •x-X":":-x~xx-x-x~:~x-x«:":~X":' V- We Are .Not the Watch Plumber '> <• But Wo Can Do Your •:• I GAS FITTrNQl Or Put lip Any Stove to Suit the Wife las. EAKINI k M2S.Kentncky, Phone 453 |: Has Put In a Stock of NEW CARPETS Prices the Lowest. Cheap Charley, New Brick, North St. Rubber reys, Fi Harness Tire Runabouts and Surrie Surrey alnd Driving Whips, Fly Nets, Dusters, Summer Goods and Lawn Swings. V t WISWALL, KENNEDY & CO. NEXT TO- CITV QAS OFFICE ^-^•x-^•^•:-X"X~x-x~:-^H No. 117, West Madison Ave. ± :<-X":":«:X ~j»>':-^x -:rX ~x~:-x ~X "^x ~H -x~x-x NOW FOR COriFGliT Dress Gopds that aire good and beautiful, y^t eoolland ^breezy. That is what yop are looking for, the kind we are showing. PHces the lowest.' Do Not Forget Plastico -APirfiot Wall Coatlni^ an<^ Durability Any one can brush It on No one oan rub It off PlfcStico 18 a pore, permanent and porotu wall coating, and does not require taking off to renewaadoUukalBominea. It la a dry iwwder, ready for use by addiue cold water and can be easily Drushed on by any one. Made in .white and fourteen f alienable tints. AITf-KALSOIIIIE CO. 6IAND RAPIDS. WCH.;; Fer fall pardcfllar* urf •Miila card ask Oiir GROCIeRY bdPARTriENT, No One Undei^ells Us. ^KCjE> O^iSKT, Gross & Kjz^lei? | Dry Goods - Shoe^j Groceries. Wil^ Potter Has moved from the stone barn on East Ma^i- | son avemie to • The Star Barn ' on West street, where he will continue to buy ; your horses and mules paying ajt all times the !! I hifjhest market price. ;! W. B. Kelley, THfC OLD TIME TlUN&riR MAff • roUr flqnippod wltli Utaavr s&d • ptlngdr»y«. Omoeln Model Qro- eery. .oSori reoelvetf by IPMn: K Ottoe Ptaons. BesUetjce noun IT. ..Lar|;est Line.. Ice Creain ^'"at?"

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