Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas on August 19, 1974 · Page 4
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Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas · Page 4

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Monday, August 19, 1974
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Page Four HOPE (AUK.) STAR Monday. August 19, 1974 Hope Star Sports Ira Berkow The big-league numbers game All you got to do is ask More about World leagues By Murray Oldc-rmaii The tipoff: And now comes the World Basketball League. And you can expect a veteran NBA guard to go off to Holland in the next month or so as a player-coach. Q. I think the World Baseball League will be Ihe worst thing that ever has happened to baseball. What do you think of this league? - Greg Po\h. Napa. Calif. I think very little of it - that is, very seldom. Just another obvious attempt by entrepreneurs to milk sports commercially which is the pervasive tactic of these times in the world of fun and games. But I don't see it as the monstrous threat to the well-being of a sport that has more to fear from the troglodytic thinking of those in command — i.e., the commissioner. Q. How many baseballs, roughly, are lost during a major league game on account of foul balls, home runs, etc.? — Rodney Walker, Pound, Wis. Best'way to answer you is that five do/en balls are rubbed down with special mud before a single game, eight dozen before a doubleheader. That's up from three do/.en and five do7.cn for like events a few years ago. To clarify an earlier answer, the mud comes from the Delaware river. Q. I have noticed a field rule that has been completely ignored. The first and third base coaches have a designated area to work from or face the penally of being ejected from the game. In the past few years, why has the ruling concerning the coaches been disregarded? In the last four years, I have yot to see an umpire order a coach to stay in his designated area. — Bud Smith, Garden Grove, Calif. The major leagues are admittedly loathe to make coaches stay strictly in their boxes, maybe out of pity for their plight when a slugger can scream a line drive in their direction. Fred Fleig of the National League can only recall one instance of the umpires calling the coaches for obstruction of play by wandering out of their boxes. Unless they blatantly interfere with the course of play, they'll probably continue to wander. After all, how many pivot men actually touch second base before releasing the throw to first on a double play? Q. I was a baseball player years ago, but I don't know how to answer my grandchildren when they ask why, exactly, is the pitcher's mound 16 inches higher than the rest of the in- Lead dwindles against Reds field. Also, if a manager can change from a righthand pitcher to a southpaw any time he wants, can a switch hitter cross over to the other side of the pjale any time he wants? — W.E. Evans, Cambridge, Ohio. Just tell them, gramps, that the pitcher's mound today is actually 10 inches higher (it was lowered a few years ago) and the only reason for the elevated platform in the first place is the pitchers' plaint a long time ago that they needed a launching pad for better leverage. On the switcheroo, the batter can cross over any time he wants — as long as it's between pitches. Q. I've heard and read that the NKL's new hash marks had a great deal to do with the big increase in the number of 1,000 yard rushers the last couple of years. Dp you think O.J.Simpson would have broken Jim Brown's single season rushing record if the hash marks had not been changed and do you think O.J. has a chance of surpassing Jim's career total? Also, how would you rate the blocking that each man had? — Carl Hayman, Mentor, Ohio. In 1972 BEFORE each of the hash marks was moved three yards, one foot and nine inches closer to the middle of the field, 10 men rushed for 1,000 or more yards. In '73, only five men exceeded that figure. So the hash marks, I feel, had little to do with O.J.'s remarkable record of 2,003 yards — in fact, they were supposed to stimulate more passing. He would have broken Jim's single season record anyway. I frankly don't think Simpson will play pro football long enough to match Brown s career record of 12,312 yards. After five years, O.J. hasn't reached the halfway mark of that total. Overall, 1 don't feel he has had the same caliber of blocking support. Parting shot: No matter what in the pro football strike, Green Bay veterans still seethe over some of the restrictive policies on their personal behavior. Got a tough question about sports and the people who ploy them? All you got lo do is ask Murray Oldetmon. Write him at (name and address ol this newspaper). The most interesting questions will be answered in this column. Olderman regrets that he cannot write personal answers to all questions. (NEWSPAPER ENTERPRISE ASSN.I By Ira Berkow NEA Sports Editor NEW YORK - (NEA) The single most prestigious thing to happen to the black man in baseball may be that he has never been chosen a big-league manger. The record plainly states that the people least qualified to discern leadership qualities and managerial acumen are the men who hire the hardball skippers. And if these owners of the teams (or their general managers, an appendage of the owners) do not see fit to place a black at the helm, then what a gaudy plume of triumph the black man may insert in his beaked, peaked cap. In the last 20 years, there have been approximately 175 managers in the major leagues. And if there had been 24 teams — as there are today — from 1954 to 1962 instead of 16, then there surely would have been over 200 managers. A few managers died on the job or quit or were retired for health reasons; all others were dismissed for incompetency. This averages out to roughly one manager for three years for every team. In any other industry, this kind of mass turnover would necessitate the universal use of revolving doors. In baseball, they use turnstiles. In any other kind of industry, such enormous and wholesale changes at such a top level of management would be destructive. Internal morale and public confidence would be in chaotic shambles. Yet no matter how often the owners bumble, the game, incredibly, survives. Apparently, the product is so good that it may be enfeebled but not altogether wiped out. In the last 20 years, only one team has kept on with one manager. That is the Los Angeles Dodgers, with Walter Alston. The Dodgers have won pennants, come close to others, fallen into the second division, returned to the top of the standings. Alston has remained. It may be more than coincidence that Dodger owner Walter O'Malley has by far the most successful operation in baseball. He draws more fans, makes more money, pleases more customers (with the cleanest and best-appointed park), and his team wins as many or more games than any competitor. The names of no other owners will be mentioned here, for it is not this writer's intention to malign, impugn, castigate or otherwise bum- rap these birdbrains. But isn't the size of their alleged minds painfully apparent when they keep firing the people they hire? And with such relative swiftness? They just are incapable of making a skilled appointment to begin with. The pattern according to the record goes something like this: They hire a man who has shown that on a good day he can tie his baseball shoe without spiking himself. First year is the "get-acquainted" year. Second year, he roust prove himself. Third year, he is given one more try - until midseason. Played well enought to win Then he is bounced. Know what next happens to this leader of men, this uncanny general of the baseball battlefields, this raving double-knit genius? He is hired by another owner. And history inexorably repeats itself. Sometimes it's shorter, sometimes it's a little longer. But the same fate awaits them all. In the American League, the Red Sox have had 11 managers in 20 years, the Indians 12, the Orioles 6, the White Sox 8, the Angels 5 in. their 13 years, the Tigers 14, Kansas City 14, Oakland 5 in 6 years, Washington-Texas 9. Minnesota 6 in 13 years, the Yankees 6, Milwaukee Brewers 2 in 4 years. In the National League from 1954: Atlanta-Milwaukee Braves 10 managers, Cubs 7-plus, Reds 8, Astros 6 in 12 years, Expos 1 in 5 years, Mets 5 in 12 years, Phillies 10, Pirates 9, Cardinals 7, Padres 3 in 5 years and the Giants 8. Some people were miffed that Clyde King instead of a black like Henry. Aaron or Maury Wills or Frank Robinson was recently selected to manage the Braves, and that Jim Marshall was the recent pick to pilot the Cubs. But both choices follow team patterns. King was fired from the Giants in his last managerial job, which qualifies him for his Atlanta job, just as such predecessors as Charlie Grimm, Charlie Dressen, Bobby Bragan, Billy Hitchcock and Lum Harris were fired by previous teams before becoming Braves' managers. And Jim Marshall, he too follows in his team's tradition of managers. From 1961 to 1965 the owner of the Cubs, grasping, attempted a novel concept. He revolved back and forth from the minors about 10 men who took turns managing the Cubs. A baseball guide book inadvertently but astutely summed up the situation; it reads: Cub managers, 1961-65, "None." (NEWSPAPER ENTERPRISE ASSN.) DoHgers' thumping might be helpful Busby suffers another loss ^^•^ -™- ^— ^ ^— ^ -™- « «.«....«._ . _-,___j, j XT_ in r>.. n u.. ... n ..«^l ..-. t« r ;iU ninlrnff nlnir *\t\t\ cnmo r»1iiff»Vi T«« O..<J« nn*l Onf T}n**Atna H By HEKSCHEL NISSENSON AP Sports Writer Jim Wynn says Los Angeles' 10-3 thumping Sunday at the hands of the Pittsburgh Pirates may be just what the reeling Dodgers needed ... and it came in handy for the Cincinnati Reds, too. While the Dodgers were suffering their sixth consecutive setback, the Reds were edging the New York Mets 6-5 to climb within 2% games of front-running Los Angeles in the National league's West Division. The Dodgers' margin is the smallest since they led Houston by two games on May 9 and it's the closest the Reds have been since they trailed by three games way back on April 26. They were Wh. out as recently as mid-July. Baseball Scores By The Associated Press National League American League East W I St. Louis Philaphia Pittsburgh Montreal New York Chicago 65 62 62 56 52 40 57 59 59 62 65 68 , Pet. .533 .512 .512 .475 .444 .424 GB — 2% 2% 7 Wk 13 East W L Pet. Boston Cleveland Baltimore New York Milwaukee Detroit West Los Angeles Cincinnati Atlanta Houston San Fran San Diego 75 73 64 61 54 48 46 49 56 59 68 74 .620 .598 .533 .508 .443 .393 — 2V2 10% im 21 Vfc 27 MJ Oakland Kan City Texas Chicago Minnesota California 66 60 61 60 58 57 54 57 59 60 63 64 .550 .513 .508 .500 .479 .471 GB — 4Vfe 5 6 8Vi 9Vfe West 70 63 62 60 59 48 52 56 61 61 63 74 .574 .529 .504 .496 .484 .393 — 5M> 8^ 9% 11 22 Saturday's Games Pittsburgh 4, l-os Angeles 3 San Diego 4, Chicago 3 Cincinnati 6, New York 2 St. Louis 5, San Francisco 3 Atlanta 7, Philadelphia 6, 12 innings Montreal 3, Houston 2 Sunday's Games Pittsburgh 10, Los Angeles 3 Philadelphia 7, Atlanta 4 Chicago 14, San Diego 6 Cincinnati 6, New York 5 Houston 3, Montreal 0 St. Louis 4, San Francisco 1 Monday's Games Los Angeles (Rau 12-6 or Downing 4-6), at Chicago (Reuschel 11-10) St. Louis (Osteen 9-9) at Atlanta (Morton 12-7), N San Francisco (Bryant 2-12) at Pittsburgh (Hooker 8-9), N Philadelphia (Twitchell 6-4) at Cincinnati (Gullett 13-8), N San Diego (Jones 7-17) at Montreal (Blair u-5),N New York (Seaver 7-7) at Houston (Wilson 8-10),N Tuesday's Games Los Angeles at Chicago St. Louis at Atlanta, N r • ancisco at Pittsburgh, N ' 'huadelphia at 'Am-i'in 4ti, N i Diego at Mont: t a 1 , N New York at Houston N Saturday's Games Cleveland 4, Texas 0 New York 2, Chicago 1, 7 innings, rain Minnesota 7, Boston 4 Detroit 4, Oakland 3 Kansas City 3, Baltimore 2, 10 innings Milwaukee 4, California 2 Sunday's Games Texas 1, Cleveland 0 Baltimore 1, Kansas City 0 Boston 9, Minnesota 6 New York 9, Chicago 4 Oakland 13, Detroit 3 Milwaukee 5, California 2 Monday's Games Chicago (Kaat 13-10) at Boston (Lee 1311), N Minnesota (Decker 12-10) at New York (McDowell 1-5), N Detroit (Holdsworth 0-1) at California (Tanana a-14), N Milwaukee (Champion 7-2) at Oakland (Blue 14-10), N Only games scheduled Tuesday's Games Texas at Baltimore, N Chicago at Boston, N Kansas City at Cleveland, N Minnesota at New York, N Detroit at Californian N Milwaukee at Oakland, N Tampa University plays au 11 football games at night this season. Seven are at home and one is In Orlando, Fla. Elsewhere, the St. Louis Cardinals downed the San Francisco Giants 4-1, the Philadelphia Phillies turned back the Atlanta Braves 7-4, the Houston Astros blanked the Montreal Expos 3-0 and the Chicago Cubs clobbered the San Diego Padres 14-6. Center fielder Wynn offered his theory after the Pirates pounded out 17 hits, most against the Dodgers this season, including home runs by Bob Robertson and Richie Zisk. The Dodgers have scored only 11 runs in their six-game slide. Sunday's assault against Geoff Zahn and three relievers also included two doubles by Robertson, one apiece by Zisk and Rennie Stennett, a two-run single by Willie Stargell and seven-hit pitching by Larry Demery and Dave Giusti. Reds 6, Mets 5 The Reds nailed down the triumph when Dave Concepcion blasted a tie-breaking three-run homer off Jon Matlack in the seventh inning after an intentional two-out walk to Tony Perez. Cardinals 4, Giants 1 John Curtis pitched a five-hitter for the Cards' fourth straight victory and also singled home two sixth-inning runs off Tom Bradley. Curtis restricted the Giants to one unearned run. St. Louis got a first-inning run on Reggie Smith's single and Bake McBride's triple. Mike Tyson's sacrifice fly boosted the lead to 2-0 in the fourth. Phillies 7, Braves 4 Bill Robinson, Mike Schmidt and Willie Montanez homered for Philadelphia in support of Dick Ruthven's six-hit pitching. Ruthven had real trouble only in the third inning, when the Braves scored three runs, two on Ralph Garr's homer. Astros 3, Expos 0 Milt May's two-run homer and Bob Watson's solo shot backed Dave Roberts' five-hit pitching. Montreal's Tom Walker was cruising along with a two-hitter going into the seventh. Cubs 14, Padres 6 Pitcher Steve Stone's two-run single highlighted Chicago's six-run third inning and Steve Swisher and Jose Cardenal homered for the Cubs. Swisher broke a 1-1 tie in the second inning with his fourth homer of the season, a two-run shot, and the Cubs chased Bill Greif with their big third. Two records are on the track today WENDOVER, Utah (AP) For the first time in the history of the Bonneville National Speed races on Utah's simmering Salt Flats, a rocket car makes an attempt today at two world records. Minneapolis racer Vern Anderson and his hydrogen peroxide-fueled Pollution Packer was to go after records in the quarter-mile at dawn in the.opening of the 6th annual Speed Week on the Bonneville Salt Flats. Anderson's rocket car, owned by Tony Fox of Minneapolis, tested the salt surface Sunday the first time a rocket car was allowed in competition. The veteran national racer made one practice pass on the nine-mile course from a standing start and was timed in the quarter-mile. Anderson will go after the records from standing starts in both directions. In another practice run Sunday, Don Vesco of San Diego tested a stock Yamaha motorcycle for the flying mile- the highest speed a racer can attain on the course. Race officials said the Salt course is in top shape, but several racers said the surface is poor this year because of a long dry period. By BRUCE LOWITT AP Sports Writer Luis Tiant didn't exactly pitch well enough to win his 19th. Steve Busby did. But then, things aren't always what they seem. Tiant was cuffed around for 11 hits in 7 1-3 innings Sunday and was sent packing when Minnesota erupted for six runs in the eighth inning. By then, though, Boston had given the veteran right-hander an eight-run cushion. So the Red Sox held on for a 9-6 triumph and Tiant became the only pitcher in the major leagues with 19 wins. Busby, meanwhile, pitched a six-hitter against Baltimore— but the fifth hit was Paul Blair's double in the ninth inning and the sixth was Brooks Robinson's single. So instead of getting victory Evert wedding to be held just for their family Fort LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Wimbledon tennis champions Chris Evert and Jimmy Connors will be married November 18 in a private ceremony, the family says. "We don't want a Hollywood- type wedding," said Chris' mother, Colette. "We just want a small, dignified ceremony." Only relatives and close friends will attend the nuptial mass presided over by Father Vincent Kelly at St. Anthony's Roman Catholic Church in this Atlantic Coast city, Mrs. Evert said. "I don't want Chrissie's wedding to be a sideshow," said Jim Evert, father of the star. No. 19, Busby wound up with defeat No. 10 as the Orioles squeezed out a 1-0 victory over the Kansas City Royals. Chicago's Wilbur Wood had a shot at No. 19, too. But he took an early shower and loss No. 14, instead, when the White Sox absorbed a 9-4 beating by the New York Yankees. In Sunday's other American League games, the Texas Rangers nosed out Cleveland 10, the Oakland A's clobbered Detroit 13-3 and the Milwaukee Brewers beat California 5-2. Tiant was rocked for all six Minnesota runs in the eighth, three on Larry Hisle's 17th home run. Then Diego Segui took over and slammed the door on the Twins. Orioles 1, Royals 0 Dave McNally outdueled Busby in the Orioles' victory over Kansas City, pitching a seven- hitter and wrecking the Royals' only serious threat with a neat pickoff play and some clutch hurling. Yankees 9, White Sox 4 New York had Thurman Munson and Elliott Maddox— which was more than enough. Munson drove in three runs with two doubles and Maddox hit a homer, his first of the year, which chased Wood. Rangers 1, Indians 0 Ferguson Jenkins pitched a four-hitter, struck out five batters and walked one for Texas. And Fritz Peterson pitched a four-hitter, struck out five batters and walked one for Cleveland. But one of the Rangers' hits was Jeff Burroughs' 24th home run. With it, he became the first player in the majors this year to reach 100 runs batted in. A's 13, Tigers 3 Reggie Jackson and Gene Tenace slugged three-run homers in a nine-run eighth inning and Joe Rudi and Pat Borque drove in two runs apiece in Oakland's rout of the Tigers. Brewers 5, Angels 2 Don Money drove in two runs with a pair of singles and Tom Murphy helped Jim Slaton with solid relief pitching in the Brewers victory over California. National League scores: Pittsburgh 10, Los Angeles 3; Philadelphia 7, Atlanta 4; Chicago 14, San Diego 6; Cincinnati , New York 5; Houston 3, Montreal 0, and St. Louis 4, San Francisco 1. Army will have 25 lettermen back for football this fall under Coach Homer Smith. The Cadets lost all 11 games last year. Relief pitcher Mike Marshall of the Los Angeles Dodgers set a major league record this season by appearing in 10 straight games. Solunar Tables The schedule of Solunar Periods, as printed below, has been taken from Richard Alden Knight's SOLUNAf TABLES. Plan your days so that you will be fishing in good territory or hunting in good cover owing these times, if you wish to find the best sport that each day has to offer. Date Aug. 19 20 21 22 23 24 A.M. Majgr Minor Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 7:50 8:35 9:30 10:25 11:25 1:55 2:50 3:45 5:35 P.M. Major 7:05 6:05 9:00 9:55 10:50 11:45 1:35 2:20 3:15 4:10 5:10 6:05 "At Anderson-Frazier Insurance consideration must be given to the needs and personality of each client. Insurance programs must be thoroughly studied and carefully designed to protect our customers from a crippling loss." C. R. 'Dick' Moore ANDERSON-FRAZIER , INSURANCE AGENCY. INC /' Inturqnee Comer -Second* Mom P. O. *M 449 Hope, Arfcorucu 71401

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