Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas on December 16, 1938 · Page 1
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Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas · Page 1

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Hope, Arkansas
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Friday, December 16, 1938
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A good response from the public Friday sent -the Goodfellow's Christ- Vn'as Cheer fund to a total tjf ?315.80. Finance Chairman Frank Johnson and General .Director Roy Anderson said that most of the solicitors had carried out (heir assignments in canvass of the business area. They ask that persons who have not been canvassed— but desire to contribute to the fund to do so this week by leaving their donations at either Hope bank or at The Star office. A big task awaits a special committee next week in purchasing, wrapping and distributing food, clothing and toys to needy children and families — wlio.se rhri.slmns would have been empty — had it not been for the Good- fellows. Previously reported ................ S199.7S O. L. Bowden ............................... 1.00 Ora Mae Moody ...................... 1.00 ' O. K. Barber Shop ............... 1.00 McHac Hardware Co ................ 1.00 Morgan & Lindsey ................... 1.00 Reginald Bcarden ................... 1.00 Mr. and Mrs. Royce L. Smith 1.00 Walker's ............. : .......................... 1.00 K. |J. Kaplinger, Jr ................... 1.00 Cecil W. Dennis ........................ 1.00 Moore & Hawthorne ................ 1.00 Crescent Drug Store .................. 1.00 W. M. Ramsey ................................ 1.00 Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Clark .... 1.00 Donald Moore ............................ 1.00 McDowell's Store ...................... 1.00 Bycrs Curb Market .................... 1.00 P. J. Drake .................................. 1.00 W. A. J. Mills ..... .".: .................... 1.00 Shipley Studio ........................... 1.00 Oliver L. Adams ........................ 1.00 Melva Dullington ........................ 1.00 Gladys Watson .......................... 50 B. E. McMeban ............. . .............. 1.00 Sara Lou Lcdbcttcr ................... 50 Mrs. Henrv Z. Holley ..... ........... .50 Erville Douglas .*.'..'„';.'.'....'„...'.'....'.'" *.5U " Lucille Hutson ............................. 50 Cash ................................. .- ................. 85 Helen Bowdcn ........................... 50 Annie Jean Walker ..................... 50 Geo. VV. Robison & Co ............. 5.00 . Lamar Cox ....... _ ........................... 1.00 John P. Cox ................................ 1.00 R. L. Broach ................................ 1.00 R. F. Routon ................................ 1,00 Duggar's .......................................... 1,00 Hilt's Shoe Store ........................ 1.00 R. T. White .................................... 1.00 Middlebrooks Grocery ............ 1.00 Western Auto Store .................... 1.00 City Bakery ................................ 2.00 T. S. Cornelius ............................ 1.00 J. A. Embree .............................. 1.00 L. Hollamon ................................ 2.50 C. C. Lewis .................................. 1.00 Paul Brianl .................................... 2.00 Talbot's Store ............................ 1.00 Geo. M. Green ............................ 1.00 B. R. Hamm ................................ 2.00 Hcmpstead County Lbr. Co ..... 5.00 Bill Wray ....................................... 50 Max Cox ........................................ 1,00 B. & B. Grocery ........................ 1.00 Southern Cafe ............................ 1.00 R. M. Patterson ............................. 50 Smith's Body Shop ..................... 50 Wyble Wimbcrly .................... 1.00 Mrs. Vincent Foster ................ 1.00 Feeder's Supply Co ..................... 1.00 Alston Foster ............................ 1.00 Koy Powell ..................................... 50 Hervcy Holt ................................. 50 Mrs. Charles Thomas ................ 1.00 Wayne C. Fletcher .................... 1.00 Joe R. Floyd ................................ 1,00 T. II. Pope .................................... 1.00 Aiiune Holley ............................ 1.00 Lorcne Gibson .......................... 1.00 S. R. Stanford ........................ 1.00 Lillian Walkup .......................... _ 1.00 M. T. Bond ....... 1.00 J. C. Wallace .............................. 1.00 Ivis BrummeU ........................... 1.00 Speedy Hutson ......................... 1.00 Mario J. Gean ............................ 1,00 Nanie Jett .................................... 1.00 Thomas W. Wagoner ................ 1.00 George Brandon ........................ 1.00 Mrs. Levena Dunkum ............ 1.00 E. S. Waterson ............................ 1.00 Fayc Riplcy ................................ 1.00 Ruth Wells .................................... 1.00 Mrs. Christine Elliott ................ 1.00 Mrs. Doris Dunn ........................ 1.00 Jack Allen ............ ; ....................... 1.00 Hester Williams ............................ 1.00 Frances Lipscomb .................... 1.00 Cornelia B. Lee ........................ 1.00 Velma Tutt .................................... 1.00 Mrs. Jerry Hcrrington ........ 100 A. H. Wade .................................. 1.00 Gwendolyn Frith ......................... 50 Mrs. O. B. Hodnett ..................... 50 W. H. Mann ................................ 1.00 Earl W. Irion ................................ 1.00 Helen Munn ................................. 50 Ed Waite .................................... 1.00 Frank Nolen ............................... 1.00 Henry Watkins ............................ 1.00 Dick Watkins ............................ 1,00 Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Strickland 1.00 T. S. McDavitt & Co ............... _ 1.00 Charley Dudley ........................ 1.00 John T. Flynn Says: The years 1925 to 1029 are generally regarded as years of amazing nnd rising prosperity. The years 1933 to 1938 are .usually looked 'upon as years of great depression. 4 inV! >il ? °- C lh ! S ll ?° followm S singular fact is worth recording. From 1925 gjg.^ «- 20 billion Goodfellow'sFund Jumps to $315.80; Drive Is Near End Persons Who Have Not Contributed Urged to Do So at Once A PPEALS MOUNTIN G Purchase and Distribution of Gifts to the Needy Next Week Earl Dudley A. K. Slusser Ed Brown Carroll Boycc Joe Olmstead W. O. Beene J. C. Wallock Joe Rider Cash 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 50 50 50 50 '•Total $318.80 From 53 That was an increase of 1G billion. Both represent enormous increases. The question is, how did bank deposits rise so mightily in those depression years? And why were we prosperous under one great deposit rise and continuously in depression under Another? The answer is that as bank deposits rose ^in the banks of America in 1925 to J929 the accutnuliitions of depositors were promptly poured into business through nc winveslmenls. But from 1933 to 1938, us deposits rose, very little of these new deposits made their wny into new investments. In the first grou pot years the deposits of banks rose under the' influence of private borrowing nt the banks. Private borrowing at the banks has slowly diminished. But government borrowing increased. And deposits in the second group of years increased under the influence of government borrowing. ' Funds Keep On Growing The bald truth revealed by these facts is that the failure of investment is not due to the failure of funds. Funds have steadily risen. The first theory behind government borrowing was that as government credit was used to create deposits at the banks, those deposits would begin to flow out into business. The first proponents of this theory believed that a few hundred million dollars would do the job. That was called priming the pump. Since then not a few hundred millions, but a staggering number of billions have teen poured nito the banks through government loans. But they have failed to flow out. Why? The pipe line along which savings flow from the savings reservoir of the country into new industry is called investment. What has happened to that pipe line? Why do savings refuse to flow through it into industry? What force along the way is causing the trouble? Here Mny Be the Answer I have one suggestion. The old pipe line, the financial system once used, was a bad one. ..It needed repairing. Too much of the savings sent through it never reached new industry, but leaked off into the hands of promoters and other parasites along the vvay. ft was necessary to rebuild that pipe Une. But it was of the most imperious importance that it should be rebuilt quickly. Instead the rebuilding of it has been going on since 1933. U has been cluttered up with the workmen, the machinery used for rebuild! ngit. 'The job has been dragged out. A wise administrator would have seen the need for tackling this job firitHliiiTg.jit.JS33 and-".getting it'doar. within a .year or two and then throwing the pipe line open for public traffic. That pipe line is a public highway. You cannot expect traffic to flow along a public highway which is perpetually under repair. That is one o fthe reasons for the lack of traffic along that line. vm T VOLUME 40—NUMBER 55 in extreme northwest portion, Friday night; HOPE, ARKANSAS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16. 1938 PRICE 6c COPY COURTHOUSE Each gallop of seu water contains ubout one-fourth pound of salt. . Gutensolm Named to State Senate Fort Smith Attorney to Fill Vacancy Left by Fred Armstrong FAYETTEVILLE, Ark.-(/P)-Govcr- nor Carl E. Bailey announced here Thursday night that he would appoint Attorney Paul E. Gutcnsohn of Fort Smith to fill the vacancy in the state senate caused by the death of Senator Fred Armstrong. Gulensohn conferred Thursday night with the chief executive after riding here with him from Alma. Bailey came here to attend a "victory banquet" given in honor of Congressman- Elect Clyde T. Ellis and himself. The governor reiterated in 'making the announcement that in his opinion no vacancy existed in the senate as a matter of law until January 1. He indicated that formal announcement of the appointment would be made shortly after that date. There had been speculation expressed in capital circles of whether the vacancy would be filled through a special election or by gubernatorial appointment. This apparently was caused by adoption of a constitutional amendment in the November general election governing filling of vacancies in office. The ballot title of the measure described it as "an amendment abolishing committee nominations, special elections, etc." and it's first section declares that the governor should make appointments, except in vacancies in the office of lieutenant governor, congressman or members of the legislature. Abe Collins, DcQueen, president of the Arkansas Bar Association and sponsor of the amendment, and several statehouse attorneys contended that the amendment did not change the law as to the method of filling vacancies in the legislature. They contended that this made mandatory the calling of a special election to fill the vacancy. Armstrong, president pro turn' of the senate during the 1937 session, was killed December 9 in an automobile crash near Mountainburg. Cofet on NEW ORLEANS. - (/TV - December cotton opened Friday at 8.52 and closed at 8.37. December contracts expired at noon. Spot cotton closed steady ciyht points lower, middling 8.39. A Tbougfct Fidelity is the sister of justice.- Horace. Chooses Death When Revealed as Philip Musica, Ex-Convict GHOST OF~HIS PAST Changed H-'is Name, Brought Three Brothers Into Big Company NEW YORK.-(/P)-F. Donald Coster, president of McKesson & Robbins, Inc., whose real identity was disclosed as Philip Musica, ex-convict who became head of a mulli-million-dollar corporation, shot and killed himself Friday at his home in Fairfield, Conn, News that Coster (or Musica) had taken his own life came shortly after the United States attorney's office here Iwd ordered his re-arrest and that of George Dietrich, assistant treasurer, and George Varnard, Canadian agent for the firm, on charges of violating the securities act of 1934. Costcr-Musica's suicide claimed a week of dizzy developments, starting when it was discovered that the crude drugs department of McKesson & Robbins, under his direct supervision, had apparently built up fictitious assets of 18 million dollars. ;Developments Friday showed Ver,nard was Musica's younger brother, Arthur, and federal authorities held it likely that Dietrich was a second brother who dropped from sight after the crash of the Musica finances years ago. Acting U. 'S. Attorney George F. Noonan disclosed Friday that there was a fourth brother, Robert, who would be arrested in the case, Ghost Out of the Past NEW YORK.— (fi')-J. Donald Coster, indicted president of McKesson & Robbins, Inc., was identified late Thursday as Philip Musica, a man who concealed a grand larceny conviction of nearly a quarter-century ago to take a commanding place as head of the 587,000,000 drug corporation now under federal and state investigation. Four separate inquiries into the apparent overstatement of $18,000,000 in McKesson & Robbins assets are under way.. Coster, who helped build up the vast concern from its beginning as a s'rnall hair tonic firm, was identified by police fingerprints. Inspector Joseph Donovan said the records showed that as Musica he was convicted and received a suspended sentence for grand larceny in the collapse of the $1,000,000 United" States Hair Company 25 years ago. Again as Musica, he was sentenced in 1906 to one year in jail and fined $5,000 in connection with a federal grand larceny case. In 1920 he was charged with perjury. Old Scandals Recalled Failure of the United States Hair Company was a great scandal and was culled "the Musica human hair case." Philip Musica (now the elderly, studious-looking F. Donald Coster, a capitalist with a Connecticut country mansion and a yacht) was the highly re- spectfd son if a man who had been dealing for 30 years with the city's top bankers. Suddenly he was accused of having negotiated $300,000 to $500,000 in fraudulent bills of lading and worthless drafts, and when others went to look fol Musica's 700 cases of valuable human hair they reported they found nothing but rubbish and lead to increase the weight up. How and when Musica became Coster is a mystery. His 15-line notice in Who's Who paints a background of learning, eminence and culture in which the white-mustached, bespectacled promoter for many years has appeared conVfortably. He is listed as a'doclor of philosophy from Heidelberg University; a former practicing physician; a "corporation official," with many brilliant connections; a member of the Now York Yacht, Bankers,' Lotos, Advertising and University clubs. Dates in his career which have appeared in a version of his life previously accepted as authoritative contrast oddly with the dates the police said they found in his criminal record. For example, in 1909, the year his official biography says he emerged with his Heidelberg Ph. D., he had been living for three years under the stigma of a theft conviction, police said. Under his own authority he had been listed as a practicing physician in 191.3: Under the police authority that (Continued .on' Page Four) Cou "fy °" Hem P stead Rider Breaks 6round for Foundation Coun V« PWA-Financed $200,000 Courth6use EMERGENCY ADMINISTRTION Argentine Holds Out Against U. S. Asks Guarantee Against Aggression by U. S. as Well as Europe By the Associated Press Argentine insistence that the possibility of aggression by the United States must be considered, was the main obstacle Friday to a declaration by the Pan-American conference of a solid front against aggressors. In the face of Argentine opposition to the pact, the United States delegation indicated it would be content with a strong resolution if it included a declaration against aggression by nations outside the Americas. • In Franco, the Right wing parlies, on which Premier Daladier depends for the life of his government, issued a united demand through the newspapers Friday for dissolution of the French Communist party. The Italian cabinet ordered Jews to exchange all land and buildings above a fixed value for bonds bearing 4 per cent interest. Tins order fulfilled decrees adopted Nove-nx'ber 10 forbidding Jews to own land with a taxable income of more tha nabout $260 a year, or buildings whose annual taxable income exceeds about $1,040. In London, the inter-governmental refugee committee considered Hitler's terms for Jewish emigration from Germany as Hjalmar Sclfecht, president of the Reichsbank, outlined them. Director George Rubles was understood to have declared that the committee did not hope to finance a large- scale emigration unless Hitler allowed the Jews to take sanVe of their wealth with them. Hopkins Is Talked for Roper's Post May Succeed Secretary of Commerce Shortly, F. D. Says WASHINGTON. — (.¥) — President Roosevelt said Friday amid talk that Harry Hopkins might be the new Secretary of Co'nVmcrce, he had not yet made up his mind on cabnet replacements. Roosevelt said he oould not tell when cabinet appointments, and an appointment to the supreme court, might be expected. Col d&torage lockers to preserve meats, fruits and vetebales are now being used by from 800,000 to 1,000,)00 American familiese, estimates show. Legion Fish Fry Is Well Attended Here Several State and District Officers Are on the Program Approximately 200 persons attended the annual fish fry and mulligan stew held Thursday night at Fair Park by the Leslie Huddleston post of the American Legion. Visitors were here from Texarkana, Stamps, Little Rock, and other towns. Speakers included the Rev. V. A. Hammonds of Hope; Dr. L. J. Kosminsky, grand chef de gare of the Arkansas 40 and 8, Texarkana; Bob Sisson, past state department commander and present state membership chairman of Little Rock; Bert Presson, department adjutant, Little Rock. Joe Lee, department athletic officer, Little' Rock; Merlin Fisher, assistant service officer, Little Rock; Ben Kcsterson, chef de gare of 40 and 8 local, Texarkana; Royee Weisenbergcr. Hempstead county representative elect to Arkansas legislature; T. E. Johnson, post commander of Texarkana. W. S. Atkins, mayor-elect of Hope; N. E. Graham, 12th district commander of Stamps; W. H. Arnold, Jr., vice- commander of the western district of Arkansas, Texarkana. The annual a'ffair was said to be the most successful ever held. The large crowd consumed 100 pounds of fish, five gallons of cpffee, 90 pounds of stew and the trimmings. The officers of the ilocal post arc: Commander, C. E. Weaver; vice-commander, H. O. Kyler; adjutant, B. C. Hollis; finance officer, M. S. Bates; service office, Robert Wilson; sergeant at arms, E, S. Franklin and R. M. Jones; post surgeon, Dr. Don Smith 1 chaplin, A. C. Kolb. Sexton beetles are so named because of their habit of burying birds and small mammals. They undermine the body until it sinks into the excavation by its own weight. Some of the following statements are true. Some arc false. Which are which? 1. Christmas presents are delivered, from camels in Syria. 2. Deer have no gall bladders. 3. Size of hose is determined by length of the foot. 4. Bees know their master. 5. Whalebone conies from a whale. i Page 'f „,, . . —Photo by Hope Star ims was an lustoric moment for Hempstead county, at 4-30 o'clock Thursday afternoon, when County Judge Frank Rider, left, broke irround for the new courthouse and jail, while Mayor Albert Graves looked on That typographical errors creep into sign-boards as well as newspapers is evidencedby the work of a hard-pressed sign-painter who was required to get his pamtmg done in time for this picture. The word "Administration" has one -A" missing (Note to the proof-reader: Nobody caught it, neither the county judge, the mayor, nor the editor-but there it was on the picture, and cameras don't lie..... or do they?) Couldn't Buy Legs— So He Hade His Own OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLA,— (/?}— Unable to buy a pair of artificial limbs after he lost oth of his legs in a train accident, Henry Falls, Negro youth, whittled some from an old Cottonwood log. Representatives of artificial limb manufacturers who later saw the pair of wooden ones Falls made, said they were a "remarkable piece of workmanship. Falls was guided by the illustrations in a catalogue of artificial limbs he obtained. His only tools were pocket knife, rusty and hammer. •• » • •— Cities to Ask for i '4 Cent Gas Tax Seek $250,000 to $300,000 Revenue for Then- Street Work LITTLE ROCK.-Cities and towns of Arkansas will ask the legislature for a quarter of a cent a gallon in turnback --which would amount to $250,000 or $300,000 a year at the present rate of gasoline tax collections—when the Fifty-second General Assembly convenes, members of the Arkansas Municipal League decided at a meeting (Continued on Page Three) Prescott Cagers to Meet Bobcats Second Game for Locals Will Be Played at Prescott PRESCOTT', Ark.-Prcscott high school's Curly Wolves are expecting one of their hardest games of the season here Friday night when they tangle with Coach Foy Hammons' Hope Bobcats in tile local gym. The Wolves, in their last game Tuesday night, defeated the Gurdon Go-Devils 39 to 26 for their second straight win. A girl's game will be held prior to the game between the Bobcats and the Wolves, starting at 7:30 p. m. The boy's game is scheduled to get under way at 8:15 p. m. The Bobcats opened the season with Prescott at Hope last Monday night trouncing the Curly Wolves, 45 to 22. Coach Hammons will probably send the same lineup against the Wolves again Friday night. Moonlight has an intensity about one-fortheith of » foot candle; bright sunlight at noon has an intensity of a- boul 10,000-foot candles. Scientists are able to tel the age of a fish by its scales. A hcring, for instance, adds a new ring to its scales every year. The Goodfellow's Club Hope, Arkansas Director of Club: Please enter my name as a member of the Goodfel- luws club as I wish to help some needy child or family at Christmas time. (Name) (Please Print) (Stivet Address) (Please Print) If you have been missed in the canvass for Goodfellow iunds you may fill out the above and mail your contribution to Hope Star. Your donation will be turned over to the club treasurer. Ground Is Broken as Contract Let on the Foundation ". C. Neal, Hermitage, Ai-k., Low Bidder on Piling at $9,787 $200,000 BUI L D I N G Quorum Court Called Wednesday, 10 a. m., to , Levy li^-Mill Tax Ground was broken at 4:30 Thursday afternoon for construction of Hempstead county's new $200,000 courthouse and jail, >a federal Public Works Administration (PWA) project on the old Garland school site in the southwest section of Hope. The first of four separate contracts required for the structure was let Wed- • nesday, J. C. Neal of Hermitage, Ark, obtaining the job of driving piling for the foundation,.at a price of $9,787.50. Mr. Neal gave a 100 per cent performance bond, the contract requiring the work to be completed in 60 days, with a penalty of $50 a day for overrunning the period. , Quorum, Court Wednesday County Judge Frank'Rider, holding a" session-of county ..court at the city, hall Friday, announced at noon tliat the HernpsteaoV>Quorum Court>has, •teen-'callecj/Ipr^special^essJon aMhe-'' city hall at' 10 o'clock' next' Wednesday morning, December 21, when the necessary tax for financing the building of the courthouse will be levied. In the November general election the voters gave legal authority for the levying of such, tax as is necessary. The federal PWA has recommended a levy of 1% mills. The PWA grant will be $90,000, and the county's share $110,000. The county's share will take the form of 4 per cent bonds, which the federal government guarantees to bu yat par, unless the county ca nobtain a premium, price. In the immediate future the county court will advertise for bids on bonds, such advertising running for a period of four weeks, after which the bond issue will be sold, either by sealed bids or by auction. Simultaneously the additional contracts will be let for construction, as follows: 1. Contract for the main building work, 2. Contract for furniture. 3. Contract for jail equipment. The courthouse building comlrdssion comprises three bankers: R. M. LaGrone, Sr., and Lloyd Spencer, of Hope; and H. M. Stephens, of Blevins. A PWA Project PWA Resident Engineer, Miles S. Proctor, pointed out that under the Public Works Administration Recovery Act, which made funds available for the construction of the local project, all work must be done by private contractors who win their contract under open competitive bidding. Effectiveness of the Public Works Administration as a recovery measure was shown by the fact that five contractors bid on the project. J. C. Neal of Hermitage, Ark., submitted the lowest bid on the plans and specification writ- V&l (Continued on Page Four) 7 Shopping Days Till Christmas INFORMING- UORW? HE'D 6OON T OOKJNG BACK TO CHRIST*^ MAS SEVEN YEARS AGO— A bleak Christmas, with depression stalking the land. . . . President Hoover was recom» mending RFC; . . , Army of 1200 "hunger marchers" returning borne Jro»» Washington. ,. . . Young Rerr Hitler was informing worlg he'd soon take over control <5| Germany. . . , U. S. disturbed over Jap conquest of Menshuria. . . , Throngs say/ Navy's new dirigible Akron float over New York.

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