Mt. Vernon Register-News from Mt Vernon, Illinois on December 18, 1968 · Page 27
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Mt. Vernon Register-News from Mt Vernon, Illinois · Page 27

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Mt Vernon, Illinois
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Wednesday, December 18, 1968
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Page 27
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8-C Wrights Flew 65 Years Ago KITTY HAWK. N.C. fAP) — Sixty-five years ago Tuesday Orville and Wilbur Wriglit made mans' first successful hcavier- than-air flight. The Dayton, Ohio, bicycle makers made the flight, and ushered in the air age. over the sandy coastal hills of Kitty Hawk. And at Kitty Hawk the anniversary is marked with speeches, flyovers by modern planes, and the unveiling of portraits of! distinguished fliers. Represenatives of the Dayton Chamber of Commerce placed a ; wreath at the Wright brothers 1 national memorial near the scene of the flight. President Johnson, proclaiming • Tuesday Wright Brothers Day, • recalled in Washington that the flight was shorter man the floor of the giant C5 cargo plane that was (est flown this year. "Bui those brief flights, in the sand hill area outside Kitty Hawk. N.C. on Dec. 17. 1903. launched , the air age. They changed mankind's way of life," the Prcsi- dent said. Orville made the first success- le S e by a to* ful flight, having won the privi-: 120 feet and Legislature Maps Limits On Con-Con By LARKY Kit AMP Associated Press Writer SPRINGFIELD, HI. (AP) shall fix the pay of delegates J to the convention. If delegates are not paid an _ adequate salary — equal per- THE PRIME MOVER — Linda Sheridan, 24, is a giant In this small theatrical world but she's a very important person to her fellow actors. Linda supplies their animation and their dialogue in the Lilliput Marionette Theater of Wolverhampton, England. of a coin. He flew romainned in the air 12 seconds. The brothers day, the longest 852 feet in 59 made three more flights that seconds by Wilbur. The Illinois General Assembly \ to that of egislatares in 1969. will attempt to place W Jl* Tff 2? limits on its chief law-making j Persons coulc afford to be dele- rival of the century: a state j gates. constitutional convention. 1 Delegate candidates, who ,pre- The convention will rewrite sumably will run from senate the basic law of the state, and ! distric,s - are r ^ UKed by its product may stand for century to control future legislative enactments if voters approve it. The present constitution was adopted nearly 100 years ago. Voters on Nov. 5 authorized the convention to study revision. Chief limits to be imposed and in the choice of convention and in the choice of 7onvention delegates. Cost estimates run $10 million and up. It's up to the legislature, for example, to decide whether legislators may serve as delegates to the convention while remaining in. the general assembly. The present constitution says legislators may not be persons or state office. It also says the legislature DODSON'S FOOD MART 1712 So. 12th Ph. 242-2953 OPEN 7 A.M. TO 6 PM DAILY FRIDAY Til 8 R.M. PILLSBURY FLOUR 5 Lb. Bag ICE CREAM Gal. HYDE PARK BROWN N' SERVE Sealtest WHIPPING CREAM Half Pint RGSEMIE PEACHES MEDIUM YELLOW ONIONS Lb. Bag GOOD RED POTATOES 20 Lb. Bag a HIP 0 LITE MARSHMALLOW CREME 13-Oz. Jar 29c CHOICE SIRLOIN STEAK Lb. fOXTHB FBSTIVB DtMER. REND LAKE WIENERS 12-Oz. Pkg. ALL BEEF HAMBURGER Lb. REND LAKE BOLOGNA BLUE BELL BACON Lb. .691 Lb. a ; constitution to be citizens, at least 25 years old, at least five years a state resident, and at least two years a resident of the district. Would election from Senate districts meet one man. one vote standards of the courts? Courts have already ruled existing senate districts must serve for election of senators until 1970. but the courts were not considering whether convention delegates chosen from such districts would give citizens in each district equal voice in de- the basic law next century. The senate may have attempted to forestall any court challenge on this question by a last minute action taken in the 1967 legislature. The senate adopted a resolu- convention purposes, it was the intent of the senate that existing senate districts would serve for election of delegates. The United Steelworkers Union's political action committee had opposed' holding a state constitutional convention on the ground that delegates chosen from present dstricts would represent "an alter ego of the present state senate." The committee criticized the senate, for tax policies that it said were favorable to business and bad for consumers. A recommendation on whether delegate elections should be partisan probably will come to the legislature after it convenes Jan. 8. The recommendation will come from the constitutional study commission. It will report views also on whether a time or money limit or both should be imposed to make proceedings get to the point quickly. V Another recommendation is expected on whether voters should be permitted to adopt or reject parts or only the entire product of the convention. In a prefiled bill, he general assembly already has received a proposal on how to elect delegates. The bill would allow lawmakers to be delegate candidates but would permit them or any other person to run without party designation. This bill for nonpartisan selection was filed! by House Speaker Ralph Smth. R- Alton, and Rep. Harold A. Katz, D-Glencoe. The apportionment question and the nonpartisan election questions both have a bearing on representation in the convention. Apportionment affects representation, providing that each delegate would represent nearly equal numbers of citizens in the writing of a new state charter. Party elections affect the changes of minority party members winning a representative voice in the charter writing. Partisans elections would make it extremely unlikely a Republican could be elected from a normally Democratic senatorial district, and vice versa. In the 1920-22 constitutional convention, delegates were nominated in partisan primaries. The present constitution says delegates will consist of double the number of the 58 senate members, "to be elected in the same manner, at the same places and 1 in the same districts." "The same manner" is interpreted by some to mean that delegates shall be nominated in partisan primaries, with runoffs in a partisan election. Under the Katz-Smith bill, delegates would be elected in the following manner: — No primary would be held. No party designation would be on the ballot. — Any person could run if he presented a petition with 1,000 signatures of registered voters from the district. — The two nominees in each district with the highest number of votes would be delegates from each of the 58 districts. — The delegates would convene in the Illinois house cham her on a date set by the gen eral assembly and would deter mine their rules for procedure. The bill gives the convention little latitude on when to submit its work to a special election. The election must not be less than two or more than six months after the convention adjourns. The bill was left open for amendment to fulfil the present constitution's requirement that the general assembly fix the pay of the members and 1 officers and provide for staff and other expenses. The amendments would fix the place, date and hour of meeting, which must be within three months after the delegates election. THE REGISTER-NEWS Family Shopping List Clip put and Fill Out Your List! Baking Chocolate Texas averages 28 tornadoes each year, Kansas 26 and Oklahoma 24. Baking Powder Baking Soda Cocoa Coffee Dairy Products Butter — Margarine Cheese Cooking Oil Cornstarch Eggs Evaporated Milk Flavoring Extracts Flour—All Purpose Flour—Cake Gelatin Ketchup Mayonnaise Mustard Pepper Salad Dressing Sugar—-Granulated Salt Shortening Spices Sugar—Brown Sugar—Confectioners Staples Cheese Spread Cream Ice Cream Milk Sour Cream Meats Bacon Beef Chicken "Fish Frankfurters _ Ground Beef Ham Lamb Liver Lunch Meat Pork" Sausage Turkey Veal Tea ^/inegar Syrup Produce Apples Fresh Fruits Bananas Cantaloupe Grapefruit Lemons Oranges Peaches Pears Beans Broccoli Brussels Sprouts Cabbage Carrots Miscellaneous Baby Food Baby Cereal Beer Candy Carbonated Beverages Cat Foot! Cereal Chocolate Ay™?Cigarettes — " Crackers _ . "Dog F° od .. Dried Fruits "instant Hems _ JamrJel1y_____. Macaroni Celery Cucumbers Garlic Lettuce Onions Peppers Potatoes^ Spinach Canned Foods Applesauce Fruits Fruit Cocktail Fruit Juices Asparagus Beans Beets ~ Corn Meats Mixed Vegetables Pineapple Mixes—Biscuits, etc. Noodles Nuts Olives Peanut Butter Pickles Puddings Rice Sauces School Supplies Snacks Soups Spaghetti Drug Items Dental Aids Disinfectants Headache Remedies lotions Razor Blades Sanitary Napkins Shampoo Peaches JPears_ Plums Peas Pumpkin Spinach Tomato Juice Vegetable Juice Bakery Goods Breads Cakes Cookies Rolls, Buns Frozen Foods Cakes, Sweets Cocktail Snacks Fish Fruits Fruit Juices Pies — Meat Pies Pizzas Potato Products Soups Vegetables Shaving Cream Household Supplies Bleach Candles Cleanser Cleansing Tissue Detergents, Soaps "foil Wrap Freezer Supplies Furniture Polish "llghT Bulbil Mop Napkins Paper Bags Paper Towels Picnic Supplies Shelf Paper Shoe Polish Soap, Hand Starch Toilet Tissue Toothpicks Water Softener Wax Wax Paper Window Cleaner 'Specials' and Other Items . r REGISTER-NEWS FOOD ADS SAVE YOU MONEY!

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