Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas on November 19, 1938 · Page 3
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Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas · Page 3

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Hope, Arkansas
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Saturday, November 19, 1938
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Page 3
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-• Saturday, November. 19..198S HOPE Sf AR, H0t»i ABKAKSAS Time Time has a Crushing power, Like wind or angry tide, One minute or an hour Smashes mnn's stoutest pride. Time movps at steadfast pace, Unchanged by ho'pes or fears, Man's madness to efface, Time can wait countless yenrs, Ages moy come and go, ; Nations way rise nnd fall, Trumpets of war may blow, Time willjoutlive them, all. Time is perennial spring, Deathless its strength appears. .Man is the hurried tiling, Racing through'days and years. —Selected. Edward Woodford and daughters, Nancy Jnne and Susan Ann of Little Rock, and Judge Puval Purkins arid daughter, Nancy Lane of Warren. The meeting of the Board of Christian Education, First Methodist church which was to have been held on Monday evening, has been postponed. Mrs. W. Q. Warren was hostess to (he members of .the Friday Bridge club at a covered dish luncheon at her home on South Mnin street. The high score favor went to Mrs. Thos. Kinser. Mrs. Daisye Korndorfer and niece Miss Uma Stophs have returned from a two weeks visit in Wewoka, Tulsa nnd Oklahoma City, Okla. The Ogk-sby P. T. A. will sponsor,) w r, whill^nTf ,^»< Jfe annual Thanksgiving Chiyaon-L Jv jSS K Sfe theminn sale. Chrysanthemums will do Ark visited their n, Chrysanthemums will be on sale at the Capital hotel. Tlie different circles of tho W. M. U., First Baptist church will meet at 2:30 .Monday afternoon as follows Circle Nos. 1 and 2 at the home o Mrs. W. R. Hamilton, South Eln street. Circle No. 3 at the home of Mrs. S. L. Murphy, East Broadway Circle No. 4 at the home of Mrs. Chus, Hervcy South Pine street. Circle No 5 at the home of Mrs. John Britt, 123 South Washington street with Mrs, Rob Jones as joint hostess. Mrs. Jack Williams and little son, Jackie, of Sheridan, have spent the post few days visiting with Dr. and Mrs. J. G. .Martinclalo. Misses Marie and Nannie Purkins will have as week-end guests, Mrs. Henry B. Bethcll of Little Rock, Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Silas Easterjing announce the arrival of a baby daughter, Bonnie Sue, born Novqmber 16. DOUBLE FEATURES EVERY DAY! Only lOc and 15c • SUN. DICK POWELL in "ON THE AVENUE" PAT O'BRIEN in "SUBMARINE Tues.-Wed.-Thur. "PIGSKIN PARADE' —and— "HUNTED MEN" fiUElifB Preview SAT. RIALTO SUN-MON-TUES GREAT! . .. because of its two lovable stars! . . . because it's true to life! . . . because it tears at your heart! Prefer U. S. Goods (Continued kom Page One) and German Chambers of Commerce are incessantly busy with the job of promoting German trade. All sorts of inducements are offered. Heavy discounts are made. German and Japanese and Italian traders and shippers are subsidized. The Italian government will supply Italian pilots without cost to train aviators 'where the planes arc bought from Italy. In certain countries Germany will not buy goods unless there is an agreement to ship them in German bottoms. As a result in Ecuador, for instance, Germany gets 43 per cent of the shipping trade. All this sounds formidable. But we have to remember that dumping is an old American custo'm 1 . or years manufacturers hero, heavily protected by high duties, sold at high prices in our markets and dumped their surpluses on European and other foreign markets. At this very moment the United States goernment is attempting to sell abroad a hundred million bushels of surplus wheat, on which she has paid American growers subsidies and which she is trying to dump abroad. As for barter, there is of course nothing immoral about it. Only a few SAT. |^ • «A W .m3 SAT. His Newest— First Showing! GENE AUTRY — in— "Rythm On the Range" With SMILEY BURNETT ALSO N T o. 11— "UNDERSEA KINGDOM"! Cartoon— "Little Buck Chceser" I FIRST CHRISTIAN Vt A. Irhmmnml, Pastor Even with the pastor sick and unable to preach last Sunday attendance in Sunday school lacked only two of rciaching the 100 mark. Our average for November is above 100. Let's keep it there all month. Be in your class Suidap morning at 9:45. Boost for a bigger Class and a bigger Sunday ocnTol. 'Die pastor will speak Sunday mowing in the service beginning at 10:50 on the subject "Thanksgiving and the Worshipper." Modern day worshippers, at Thanksgiving time, often raise their souls in gratitude to God for things material and forget the spiritual blessings that come to them through the worship services at the Jiouse of God. Thanksgiving should be to the true worshipper not only an injunction to be thankful and a challenge to worshipful praise of God, but also a joy brought by .an Increasing knowledge of the true value of worship. "Enter into His gates with thanksgiving." The ladies of the church will conduct a food sale somewhere downtown Wednesday. Funds raised will be placed in the "Paving Tax Fund" underwritten in this year's budget by the Ladies' Aid. After an interruption of two weeks caused by the illness of the pastor our regular night services will be resumed tins week. The service begins promptly at 7: JO and closes within the hour Uic sermon is a verao by verse study of Luke 17 on the theme "Jesus . Come and worship with us Sunday. You will be heartily welcomed and your presence will bring a blessing to you and to us. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCir Thus. Brewster, Pastor Sunday School 9:45 a. m. Morning Worship 10:55 a. m Vesper Service 5 p. m. Monthly Auxiliary meeting Monday at 3 p. m. Union Thanksgiving Service Thursday morning at 10 a. m. Message by pastor First Methodist church. FIRST BAPTIST William Russell Hamilton, Pastor 9:45, Sunday school. 10:55, morning worship. Sermoir "God's Plan." G:30, Baptist Training Union. 7:30, Evening service. Sermon: "The One Way." Everyone is cordially invited to attend these services. Attention is called to the Thanksgiving service next Thursday morning Thepaslor of the First Methodist church will preach the sermon at the First Presbyterian church. "JUNGLE JUVENILES" "Boss Didn't Say Good Morning" Preview Sat. 11 p. m. Sunday & Monday CAST OF THOUSANDS! With PAUL KOBSON— in "Sanders of the River" Hear him sing us in Showboat! Paul Roblsan star of musical hits. 2 —Shorts and News HfMRY LEUIE HUU-FENTON-REYNOLDS —SALE— Sample Gloves 49c [A collection of gloves from Amc Ileus most famous makers in K (Suede, and imported fabrics. Buy jfor yourself and for gifts. LADIES Specialty Shop k v.v.v.v.v.w.v.v.v.v.v ; ; Try Us For Vour Meat Curing »J and Smoking. We Do It Right. f~ " Home Ice Company £ 1 91G East Third Street Hope, Ark. City Meat Market CHOICE K. C. MEATS, HOT TAMALES and OYSTERS. PROMPT FREE DELIVERY. PHONE 767 ITCH Prescription 200,000 CURES ITCH JOHN S. GIBSON . DRUG CO. FHA 5% Loans New and existing property. Real Estate Mort. Loan Service Pink Taylor, Agent; 309 First Na-| tioiial Bank Building. Phone 680. weeks ago our government suggested swapping American wheat for Baailian coffee. But Brazil has just announced she will have-none of this. Argentina promptly protested against such a maneuver. Dumping is a two-edged sword. It can very well do more harm than good. The merchants and producers of the country where the dumping is done invariably protest indignantly. The Japanese dumped cotton goods in Peru and it borught a storm of wrathful protest from domestic producers. But this widespread organized trade penetration is somehow inextricably connected with social propaganda. It is called "fascist penetration. A general assumption has arisen therefore that it is part of a plan to make South America fascist. And it is at this we must look in tomorrow's article. No. I Deb Comes Back for Coming Out Additional Funds (Continued from Page One) J. R. Henry 1.00 Mrs. W. G. Allen 1.00 Dr. Don Smith 1.00 Mrs. Don Smith 1.00 Mrs. Wylie Robison 1.00 Mrs. Mack Duffie 1.00 Mrs. D. H. McLemore 1.00 Mrs. Harry Lemley 1.00 Robert Edwin Ward 1.00 Mrs. Ralph Biley 1.00 Mrs. Floyd Crank 1.00 Floyd Porterfield 1.00 Thos, Kinser 1.00 Mrs. D. G. Chamberlain 1.00 Mrs. La Delia Ogbum 1.00 J. L. Powell 1.00 Dr. Etta Champlin 1.00 Dr. Chas. Champlin 1.00 Miss Mamie Twitchell 1.00 Claude Nunn 1.00 Mrs. Martin Pool : 1.00 Mrs. W. W. Duckett 1.00 Mrs. S. L. Reed 1.00 Mrs. Swakie Callicutt 1.00 Mrs. Orie Reed _ _ 1.00 Mrs. Blanche Cannon 1.00 Mr. and Mrs. John Vesey 1.00 Mrs. J. W. Perkins 1.00 Josephine Hospital 1.00 Miss Mable Ethridge 1.00 Mrs. E. P. O'Neil 1.00 Mrs. Frank Hicks 1.00 Mrs. W. H. A. Schneiker 1.00 Bertha Zimmerly 1.00 Mrs. C. G Coffee 50 Mrs. Harry Moore 1.00 Miss Linda Jewell 1.00 A. G. Davis 50 Mrs. Roy Mouser 1.00 Mrs. Thompson Evans 1.00 Mrs. C. C. McNeill 1.00 C. C. McNeill 1.00 Mrs. Saner 1.00 Mrs. Galester and daughter .... 1.00 W. J. Clones 1.00 Mrs. W. J. Jones 1.00 C. R. Milburn 1.00 Harry Barlow 1.00 Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Rettig 1.00 Mrs. R. M. LaGrone 1.00 Mrs. John Arnold 1.00 Mr. and Mrs. Roy Johnson .... 1.00 Mi's. S. L. Braoy 1.00 Total 5335.55 * • ma- President Roosevelt doesn't seem to care for the Committee Investigating un-American Activities and from his comments one might think the Dies wer loaded. °, r u s ? ite , in Nassau from a surfeit of publicity as New York's debutante, Brenda FraZier flew to Miami. She's homeward bound for her December debut Got a Few Spare Moments? Make Dress for Yourself By CAROL DAY Tliis is such a lovely, soft graceful dress that you can scarcely believe it's so easy to make. Just cut out the front and the back— they're alike—sew them together, and put in your sleeves. Tie a. sach or fasten a fancy belt around your waist and there you are. Smartly frocked for afternoon, with a blouse at the waistline, a full and graceful skirt, angel sleeves, and a high neckline just, irregular enough to be unusually becoming, this new cle- MIND Your MANNERS T. M. Reg. U.-S. Pat. Off. Test yoUr knowledge of correct social usage by answering the following questions, then check against the authoritative answers below: 1. Is it enough to say simply, "Miss Smith—Mr. Jones," when introducing two strangers? 2. How might a man correctly introduce his wife to an older woman? 3. How might he introduce a jnan to her? 4. Should parents include their children in introductions? 5. How might a hostess introduce a maid to a houseguest whom she will serve? What would you do if— You are a newcomer in an office where the others call each other by their first names— (a) Call them by their first names at once? (b) Avoid using names? (c) Use Miss and Mr. until you become one of them? Answers 1. Yes. 2. "Mrs. Brown, I would like you tp knw my wife." 3. "Mary, this is Mr. Bates."— or "Jim Bates." 4. Yes, 5. "This is Mary. She'll look after you." Best "What Would You Do" solution.—(<_•). (Copyright 1938, NBA Service, Inc.) sign, Pattern 8344, is certainly the answer to your dress prayers. Choose soft, drapcy fabric for this design—things like velvet, silk crepe, soft wool or satin. And now that metal cloth is becoming so smart for afternoon, .very soft gold-or silver cloth would be lovely. Pattern 8344, is designed for sizes 12, 14, 16, 18, 20 and-40. Wth long sleeves, size 14 requires 3% yards of 39-inch material. ^With short sleeves, .3% yards. The new Fall and Winter Pattern Book, 32 pages of attravtice designs for every size and every occasion, is now ready. Photographs show'dresses made from these patterns being worn; a feature you will enjoy. Lte the charming designs in this new book help you in your sewing. One pattern and the new Fall nad Winter Pattern Book—25 cents. Pattern or book alone—15 cents. For a Pattern of this attractive model send 15c in coin, your name, address, Name of'Jehovah' Banned by Nazis Germany Also Prohibits Names of Old Testament Prophets By the Associated Press Nazi Germany Saturday banned the name of Jehovah, and all prophets of the Old Testament, from Protestant churche.1 as anti-Jewish drives con- sinued ni Germany ami Italy. An order by President Friederich Werner of the supreme evangelical church Council said the name Jehovah must be erased wherever it is displayed in German Protestant.churches. Authoritative sources at Rome said 15,000 Jews were dropped from government and private jobs in'the past four days. The lower house of Czechoslovakia granted autonomy to Slovakia a nd Ruthenia as that peace-diminished country sought a new constitution rep-' resenting a compromise on the principles of dictatorship and democracy. Borah Says "No" WASHINGTON-yp)—Senator Borah, Idaho Republican, expressed the opinion Saturday that any attempt to revise the immigration laws so as to take care of additional refugees from Germany would arouse "tremendous opposition" in congress. "I do not believe it is desirable to undertake to change the immigration laws at this time," he said. "Any possible change would be wholly Inadequate for real relief." Air Raid Causes 5 Deaths in Spain 21 Injured as Insurgents Bomb, Country North of, Barcelona BARCELONA, Spain.-(/P)—Five persons were killed and 21 injured Saturday when five insurgent. planes dropped 50 to 100 bombs on- the area just north of Barcelona. The planes later appeared above Bar-' celona but were chased away by government ships. Reports reaching Hendays, on the French border, said a fife in Barcelona, believed to have been started by explosions in an amunition dump Friday, caused heavy damage. Government sources "at the border said 'they understood the fire took on grave proportions, arid considerable confusion resulted. . MlLWAtJREE-Ceorge Slaclt, 4*6«"' •holds knockout victories ov«,g ' Risko, Frank Battaglja, and oth&fc, quit fhp ring. He si enrolled in a medical course .at Marquelte. 5 Army Fliers Die in Bomber Crash Huge U. S. Craft Falls in Big Pine Forest in Georgia LAGRANGE, Ga.—(XP)—Five Army fliers were killed, two were severely injured, and one other was unaccounted for Saturday after a bombing plane crashed and burned in an .isolated wooded area northeast of here. The big bomber plowed a path for about 150 yards through a stand of large pine trees. The plane was on a routine flight from Mitchel, field, Long Island, to Montgomery, Ala. An average of 200,000 goldfish are imported into England every week. style number and size to Hope Star Today's Pattern Bureau, 211 W. Wack er Drive, Chicago, DL In some quarters the efforts of Holllywood to .beautify Corrigan for his part in the story, of his life may be regarded as gilding the dilly. Advice to consumers from all- quarters now includes about everything except where to get "the money. j • • • Radio sports news recently has been pretty bad, devoted largely to warmed over :Seabiscuits. ...'.' ^IIUIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIHIIIIHIflllfllMllllllU |Use Mont's-Sugar-Curef E When Butcheing Pork and Beef S S. • Electrically Mixed § S Printed Instructions Furnished ~ = With' Each Purchase 5. For Sale by • S 5 MONTS SEED STORE, Hope. 5 = EDWARDS & CO., Bradley S H L. R. CAUDLE, Bodcaw s = G. R. WOLFF STORE, Bingcn = niiiiiiiiiniiimiiHiiiniimiiimuiiiiig Master ' ? Shoe Rebuilders : With 22 years of experience hi flijfe Shoe, repairing enables us to glrfc you the very best. <„ We guarantee our worlt to please, 100 Block on WalnutSi DO YOU NEE'til A RUG? WOOL RUGS All .Sizes Firth and Bigelow RUGRADS Ozite and Bigelow '".'•.•.' "V See Our Rug Window.f Another Shipment of ^ BEDROOM SUITES ' f ii f<A 4 d Hope Hardware • • - . COMPANY This Will Advise That We Will Not Be in the IWarket Longer for Standing Timber, Logs, Bolts and Blocks. HOPE HEADING COMPANY Again More Quality AT SUBSTANTIALLY REDUCED PRICES ^— i ptftflCttO 1 VKCVWI* G«A- SHKt B*»O COB*-' ALL PRICES REDUCED torn* madth at much a$ $ 45 Check the greatly prices of Chevrolet for 1939 . . . Consider the greatly Increased quality of this beautiful new motor car ... Examine Its many new features of styling/ comfort, performance, driving ease . . . And then you'll know that, price for price, feature for feature, Chevrolet Is the nation's greatest dollar value. Buy a Chevrolet and lie satisfied. A General Motors Value 9(1 YOUR LOCAL CHEVIOI.tr DIALER 7.***W **IVJn^fl,n ^aotfest "^'dV, 1 rf**. *££/•*« SJSftffe--' ^OB^flKS] Young Chevrolet Co, Hope, Arkansas

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