Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas on November 10, 1938 · Page 2
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Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas · Page 2

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Hope, Arkansas
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Thursday, November 10, 1938
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Page 2
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HOPE STAR, HOm AfcfcANSAS '\':yv Star of Hope, 1899; Press, 1S27. Consolidated January 18, 1929 0 Justice, Deliver Thy Herald From False Report! ' Published every week-day afternoon by Star Publishing Co., Inc.' , C. E. Palmer & Alex. H. Washburn, at The Star building, 212-214 South ,,;Walnut street, Hope, Ark. ' v , • : , G.E. PALMER, President ALEXH. WASHBURN, Editor and Publisher CAP)—Means Associated Press. (NBA)—Means Newspaper Eneterprise Ass'n. Political Announcements "-| - ; -_i -- ----- - -- .I.L.-J.I L --- ' . Subscription Rate (Always Payable in Advance): By city carrier, per week IK: per month 65c; one year $6.50. By mail, in Hempstead, Nevada, Howard, Miller and LaFayette counties, S3.50 per year; elsewhere $6.50. Member of The Associated Press: The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise credited in this paper and also the local news published herein. Chnrjres on Tributes, Etc.: Charge will be made for all tributes, cards of thanks, resolutions, or memorials, concerning the departed. Commercial news- l papers hold to this policy in ,the news columns to protect their readers from a «-.,. deluge of .space T taking memorials. The Star disclaims responsibility or the safe-keeping or return of any unsolicited manuscripts. Racial Origins Must Be Forgotten in America K Americans were shocked s:nd saddened by the dissection of Czechoslovakia, they ought to be almighty careful not to let the principle on which that dissection was based become established in their own land. The principle is simple. It is .that the ties of "race"' are both permanent and all-important; that a man is, for all time, what his ancestors were, no matter where he may go or what he may do.and that no right of society or claim of economics can prevail against that rncialtie. That is about ES dangerous a piece of dynamite as could well be introduced into American life. For if there is one spot on earth where the whole structure of society rests on the exact opposite of that theory the United States is it. ' So it is extremely discouraging to read of the little brush which Gov. Lehman of New York has been having with the Ukrainians of that state. The Ukrainian-American Democratic Club recently bolted the state ticket .—on the ground that although the Ukrainians cast 125,000 votes in New York elections, only five persons of Ukrainian extraction hold political office. The rrcy-lent of the organization declared that in addition to patronage his people went representation in party councils in proportion to their voting strength. Now it is no great jump from that position to the position of the Sudeten Germans in Mr. Benes's Czechoslovakia. The original complaint of the Sude- tensr-that-they were not given state offices in proportion'to their strength—is almost precisely like this complaint. And although it is a little hard to impure M essrs . Hitler and Chamberlain hot-footing it-across the Atlantic to see that the downtrodden Ukrainians get justice from.brutal Uncle Sam the parallel is an ominous thing just the same. ' That insistence on the importance of racial origins wrecked Czechoslovakia It could wreck America just as neatly, if it were carried far enough • And before it is carried any farther, all who believe that the unity of the nation is worth saving tftight to express themselves. in unmistakable terms. We have in America people from every nation on earth. The only possible way for us to even to come close to order and progress is to insist that our diverse racial origins are of noimportance whatever. They may have a sentimental meaning , to be sure—but absolutely nothing beyond that. That is a lesson that we thought we had learned a century ago. Apparently it needs to be learned again. For this emphasis on the importance of race is the subtlest and most dangerous thing that could possibly arise in American Me. Unless it is stamped out we are in for the worst kind of trouble file Star Is nuthoriTcd In make the following candidate announce- rnents subject to the action of the city- Democratic primary flection Wednesday,- November 30: For Mayor J. A. EMBREE For Alderman, Ward One A. C. ERWTN .J. R. WILLIAMS For Alderman, Ward Four SYD MCMATH te^EAS-Hs! OPPORTUNITIE Tell the Quicker You Sell Services Offered See Hemnstead Mattress Shop, 712 West Fourth, for New and Re-built Phone Paid Cobb. 658-J. KEN! T. M, Res.•'U.'S: Pat. O£f. By DB. MORRIS FISHBEIN Editor, Journal of the American Medical Association, and of Hygeia, the Health Magazine Suitable Diet for Mothers Requires Careful and - Intelligent Attention:. < .;.. ' . her usually gauis about in weight. Most autorotiesj |agreed;that she xequh-es for OA^SWly'fte foods which'she ^ illy been eating, providing her diet is satisfactory, but that she n£cdg.jubre of everything, praticularly mere proteins which build tissues, "I 0 , 16 . ralcrUm and phosphorus which are' concerned with the development of bones, more iron for the Building of M 0 ^ 1 . more vitimins to prevent any deficiency diseases, and more energjj simply because of the increased requirements on her body. Provided that the mother is well ' during the period preceding her hospital trip the only attention she needs to give to her protein diet is the choice of those r wh'ich have-wheat we: calli a high biologic value. It is known'that such proteins are more important than those without .this value v .The protein that are especially important are those' of milk and maat, 'whereas' those of cereals and vegetables and fruits are less important It has been found that many different factors'will influence the amount of calcium and phosphorus that are absorbed by thhe body. It is necessary to take a cetain amount of vit- main 0 in order to get the body to use enough calcium and phoshorus. However, if her diet contains enough milk an dgreen vegetables she .will have enough calcium and phosphorus, but unless the rest of her diet is properl developed she will not utilize the cal- CIU J ri *md phosphorus satisfactory. There seems to be no lack of evidence that our diets are low in iron. As a result of this deficiency of iron. there is a tendency toward the deve- opment of mild forms of anemia. Such a codition is extremely important in mothers. Some studies have shown that iron is better absorbed when it is taken in the diet along with plenty of fresh fruits and vetfetablcs. It is also believed that a s ufficient amount of vitiman C is necessary in the diet for suitable absorption of iron. One shall that is of grcaat importance is iodine. It has been shown by innumerable experienients that failure to provide the mother with sufficient idme will not only ho serious for her but also for the child. Nowadays everyone recognizes th importance of vitamins. Tliase with which we are particularly concerned m relationship in this article are vitamins A Bl, C and D. Repeatedly it has been pointed out in this column that an insufficient amount of vitiman A tends to lessen the resistance of the body, thaat a, deficiency of vitiman Bl is associated with various disordprs of digestion and with a lack of appetite. In most cases the diet will be satisfactory if it contains enough milk green and yellow vegetables, fresh uncooked fruits and a moderate amount of meat. The i*iet wil not be satisfactory if it is restricted la-gely to refined cereal foods, manufaturcd and dried food products and sugar Providing a suitable diet is not an intricate, scientific matter, but it dees take careful and intelligent attention FOR RENT-;Furnished front room, connecting bath, hot water, garage ' ' See us for remodeling or repairing your home, all building materials and supplies sold oh long easy terms. Williams Lumber Co. 7-6tc FOR SALE—Rhode Island Pullets They are nice. Hugh D. Clark. 8-Htp , adults only, 712 East Third ' Street' ! £ • Phone 735. 7_ 3tp ' I Gulre - FO'H SALE—Filling station, tourist camp for sale or ron<, 1% miles north of Prescott on 67. Mrs. Ida E Mc- 7-3tp For Safe STAR OFFICE. ! We have two used pianos repossessed I in this vicinity stored at W. A. J. Mills. Will let go for balance due. •.» . r> *, r ...~....... A Music Co., Texrfrkana, U. S. A. FOR SALE—All white porcelin cook stove, 4 burhers and oven at E C -Brown Cotton office. Good ns new. J. S. Conway, Jr. 7_3t Thursday, .Kpvetnfrer 10,1988J FOIt SALE-Bonuty work, the best in permnnents. Herloise, Kathleen, Carmen, Voncoil. -Kate's Bcniily and Gift Shop. "For Something New Cnll 2 ™'_ IM-Nov 3lc D , FOR SALE=493G~ DoLu7~hriOT Plymouth. Small pnyments. In good condition. Phone Hope Star 768. 9-3tc , FOR SALE-Two White Face Bulls, not registered but pure bred. One 3 ten an ald wc '6"' 1100 pounds, price ?60.00. One 18 months old weight 500 pounds,,price 530.00. Cms Hayncs. . 10-3tc Wanted to Rent WANTED 7-3tc slrable. Call SGI. de- BOARDING HOUSE ...with... MAJOR HOOPLE 8-3tp. Lost LOST-'Light red Ware mule 12 years old, Wefght 800»lbs. Reward. Notify Carter Smith, MoNab or R, M. LaGronc Jr., Hope. 8-3tp Wanted WANTffiU—Native nnrl paper shell pecnns. Highest prices paid. P. A. Lewis Motor Co. 304 East 2nd St. Phone 40. 3-26tc Notice .NOTlCE-5% F. H. A. Loans, $100 and up. Pink W. Taylor, Office 309 First National Bank Building.29-Btc NOTICE—Local money to loan on improved farm lands and city property; low interest rales; quick action. Harry J. Lemley, Hope, Arkansas, Today'* Answer! to CRANIUM CRACKERS Questions on Pnge One 1. True. Snnkes h'iivu ir> "eyelids 2. True. Indimmpolls is the InrK est inland city in the world. 'A. Fnlse. The United States owns • nitfre thnn 0000 islands. . 4. Fnlse. Snow docs enrich the H soil, both with nitrogen and sulphur !i. False. Birds coir: tlielr heads In order to see better. Tha 200-Inch telescope at Ml, Pnlo* mar, Calif., will, it is hoped, be abll to penetrate space for a distance c 7,200.000,000.000,000,000,00 miles. Twenty an hour—one every thro minutes—was the average number c™ foreist fires occurring in the Unitcd!j Stales last year. McCaskill Miss Eva Jean Shuffield spent the week-end visiting relatives in Lockesburg. Mr. and Mrs* L. J. Choate of Natchitoches, La., visited Mrs. B. L, Smith and other relatives here (his week-end Miss Lucille Smith and Ernestine Hyoser of Blevins spent Saturday with Lola Wortham. Misses Nell Henry, Waldine Wil- haUVs, Eria Kelley and Evelyn Rhodes of the MsCaskill Junior High School faculty attended the teachers'confer- ence in Little Rock, last week-end Mr. and Mrs., Graydon anthohy and Mr. and Mrs. Chester McCask'illy were Hope visitors' Saturday night.' J. A. Sevedge and Herman Rhodes were visitors in Hot: Spraings Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Estus Reese and children of Mt. Pleasant, Texas, visited relatives here Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Eley were Little Rock visitors Sunday. ,FAIR* TALE YOUTH HORIZONTAL 1 Pictured youth from fairy lore. 7 His story is in the " Wights." 13 Professional tramp. 14 Water wheel. Iffln.'reality. 17 Windmill sails. . 18 To accumulate H 19 Halt. 20 And. 21 Form of "a." 22 Southwest. 24 Mystic syllable. 25 Senior. 26 Hurried. 28 Suture. 30 August. 32 Ocean. 33 Palm leaf. 35 Rodent. 37 Perfume. 39 Lair. 4Q Theatrical Play. Answer to Previous Puzzle 42 Meat. 43 To brag. 44 Tribal unit. 45 Sea eagle. 46 Musical note. 48 Kiln. 49 Rims. 51 Thin. 53 All ftight. 54 Beer. 55 Morindin dye. 56 Southeast, 58 Death notice. 59 Born. 61 He obtained a lamp and ring. 62 Two frightful appeared when he rubbed them, VERTICAL 1 Exclamation, 2 Opposed to higher. 3 To instigate. 4 Dower property. 5 Silly. 6 Name. 7 Sloths. 8 Civet. 9 Twice. 10 In. 11 Smell. 12 Woof toots. 15 Beam. 21 Armadillo. 23 To fend off. 25 These demons were . q o' the lamp. 26 Stamp. 27 Clumsy bird. 28 Without. 29 Pressed grape skins. 31 The demons• ed his every> wish. 32 Station. 34 Meadow. 36 Eagle's claw. 38 Sandpiper. 41 Face covers. 43 To besiege. 46 The remains 47 Popular jargon. 50 Night. 52 On .the lee 53 Electrical Unit. 57 Roof point covering. 58 Giant king. 60 Half an em. Hopes to Find Trace of Ancient Race HONOLULU. T. H.-^-Dr. 1^,, ihompson, young rsearch associate all the University of Hawaii, 'has e'nv- barked for Guam to spend six months m trying to unravel the mystery of the old Chamorro race which Magellan found on the island. Among the arche'aeological remains she will investigate are two rows of ancient stone slabs that long have puzzled scientist. : Legal Notice NOTICE OF REVISION OF ASSESSMENTS Notice is hereby given that the Board of Assessors of Street Improvement! District No. 3, of Hope, Arkansas, will ! meet at the office of L. Carter Johnson, second floor of the Arkansas Bank & Trust Company Building in the City of Hope, Arkansas, at 10 o'clock a. m. Tuesday, November 15th, 1938, for the purpose of revising and readjusting the assessments of benefits against the real property in said district. ( Any peron desiring any revision or readjustment of his assessments, or any change in values, for improvements erected or removed, or any whatsoever, may appear before the Board and make application therefor and same will be considered This 5th day of November, 1938. POLK SINGLETON, EUGENE WHITE, CARTER JOHNSON, Board of Assessors. Nov. 5-8-10. CLASSIFIED RATES One time—2c. word, minimum 30c Three times— 3 l &c word, min. 50c Six times—6c word, minimum 90c One month (26 times)—18c word, minimum $2.70 Rates are for continuous Insertions only. In making word count, disregard classification name such as "For Rent," "For Sale," etc.—this is free. But each initial or name, or complete telephone number, counts as a full word. For example: FOR RENT—Three-room mod«rn furnished apartment, with garage close in. Bargain. J. V. Blank, phone 9999. Total. 15 words, at 2c word, 30c for one time; at SVzc word, 53c for three times, etc. NOTE: All orders placed by telephone are due arid payable upon presentation of bill PHONE 768 OUT OUR WA\ By J. R. WILLIAMS ILL CURE. VOU KIDS OF PUTTIN COMIC MUD NOSES ON MY CIGAR . STORE INDIAN: MUMlLIATOM OF IT/ A CITIZEN OP MV STAMDIMG ELECTED CUSTODIAL OP STRAY CAKIINJE3/' DRAT IT/ I'LL ' RESK5N/ ECiADi, THOUGH, THE OFFICE CARRIES WITH COMGRAT ULATI CMS CATCHER,— HUH /MAYBE THE OLD "G-MANJ" IS OM TH 1 TRAIL OP SOME OUTLAW HOUND ~«_ APPROPRIATE •"'' <'^r~;<v. .jyi Sg^W JK " -v * -^r^_ j*~— - 11 r\ ~ I i. COPR. 19^B BY NEA SERVICE. INC.~T M. REG, I AINU HEK BUDDIES By EDGAR MARTIN VOOR CAM CV£P,K> OP vo\v.\- Xoo '. Xou'Wt. ALLEY OOP Looks Like a Big Job By V. T. HAMLIN ' ? SO THIS ISTH' MICE, QUI&T MEiGHBORHOOD WE'VE. GOT INTO, EH -i VEA,.GIDDLES.Y THAT 12ACKET WOULD AWAKE TH' DEAD/ BY JIMIKTI, ru. f\f TO THAT MVSvElj; B^EM IF HAFTA BUST A FE\A/ BV GUM, THAT REMTAL "DO SUMPIM ABOUT THAT 0(2,--- . I COPB. 1930 BV MT« SERVICE, WASH TUBES No Time for Argument By ROY CRANE .. i THE PRES1DEUTIAL PALACE. VOHEU AW AWFUL COW MOTION IS HEARD. I BUT \OOW ARC-UE, MVOARLEEN61 HO\.VSWOKE1\WOE« EEF HE FIND VOU HEV... h \MSIDE THE • «-—-™/»-»—-^. taw* v»i»k« i*r** * »*—» tm wrivi SOU OF THE SECRET POLICE ^r~' "?>--_ / BUT WHEEELL OPEM TH' OONVm POOR! FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS Identity Established By MERRILL BLOSSER ^tbu GOT ~K> SIVE ME BETTER. PROOF THAT Z HAVE BEEN A VICTIM OF SHENANIGANS / HOW DO I KNOW YOU'RE ' TELLIN' THE TRUTH T> \ 7 ~ CANT You see \f SONNY , L HE PLOTTED THIS To V BEEN A FOOL <EEP ME OUT OF THE J I'LL GIT YoL? ' GAME ? .-S DOWN THIS MOUNTAIN so FAST. WHY DIDN'T 1 THINK OF THIS BEFORE .' LOOK i HAVE A PICTJJR.E HERE A CLIPPING FROM A SPORTS PAGE J IS THIS THE _._ WHO TALKED TO YOU THAT'S HIM THE FELLER ON THE LEFT' IT'LL TAKE PER YOUR AWN is BREAKING AMD FRECKLES is STILL HELD CAPTIVE — MYkA NOK1 H, s Bum Guess, Jack ^^ Thompson and Charles Coll WELL, EK,-THAWKS,MVKA- GUESS THAT'S ALL I WANT- THIS CODE JO5T ABOUT HUH? WHV, UU»THIU& OH HAkJG IT, MV1JA... tVE GOT TO KMO'W ABOUT AMD WHiTey, i -- WELL, VOUKJG MAW -JUST HI, JACK .'MEET MISS KITTV GEAY TAKE A PEEK IM THE NEXT I^oo^^ -VOUR. FAL, HAS A VISITOE. FEOM MAEClE-D IU VUMA 1O-

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