Ukiah Daily Journal from Ukiah, California on June 14, 1998 · Page 37
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Ukiah Daily Journal from Ukiah, California · Page 37

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Ukiah, California
Issue Date:
Sunday, June 14, 1998
Page:
Page 37
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Mail • Guns still don't kill people While I certainly sympathize with the ordeal that U.S. Rep. Carolyn McCarthy has been through ("Straight Talk," May 1-3) — her husband was killed in the 1993 Long,Island train massacre — I remain steadfastly opposed to gun control. We don't solve societal problems by abolishing liberty. Rachel O'Kelley Seneca, S.C. • Plenty more than just chocolate ER's Anthony Edwards refers to Hershey, Pa., as a "one-gig town" ("Make the most of where you are," May 810). That's a surprise! While my hometown is most famous for candy bars, we're also home to one of the East Coast's most renowned medical centers. Our public schools are superb. We have the Hershey Bears hockey team and all kinds of sporting events year-round. We have a five-star hotel and a huge convention center, and the city supports a variety of entrepreneurs. The Milton Hershey School has been home to tens of thousands of indigent youngsters. We're not anything like Los Angeles. With its tree-lined main street and small-town atmosphere, Hershey is a wonderful place to live and raise children. Come visit us sometime, Mr. Edwards, and I will be glad to show you around. Sara Shenefelt Hershey, Pa. • Christopher Reeve: Still a super man Thanks for the super cover story on Superman actor Christopher Reeve ("I have to give instead of taking," May 15-17). Reeve's heroic struggle to cope with paralysis is truly inspirational. His positive words, deeds and hopefulness should inspire us all. Hollis Dean Tate, Troy, Mich. • Cokie Roberts and motherhood I was disappointed at Cokie Roberts' Mother's Day essay on motherhood ("I was a better mother because I worked," May 8-10). I guarantee that the children of working parents who sit in day care or an after-school program just want and need their mom and dad. Ms. Roberts said that although her work has gotten in the way of her family, she was "there for everything important." Important to whom? And what about the "small stuff"? A funny face, a scratched knee, a comforting hug? Working parents miss so many moments that A FRESH way to celebrate the FOURTH It's Suddenly Sulud, the cool, delicious pustu salud you can make fresh thin Hummer Suddenh 1 SALAD in five crowd-pleusing flavors, including Classic, creumy Runch & Bacon and tangy Caesar. SUDDENLY SALAD. Make it /res/. </,/» summer | CGcncnJ Mil!.. Inc. IDfiB rrv»n lomnUH. 1 * not i are fleeting and that can never be replayed. Our first responsibility must be to our children, and doing what is best for them — not for our own egos. Bonnie Castillo Fort Myers, Fla. Why don't you write about everyday folks and their struggle to make it in a country with such disparity between rich and poor? Why not write about poor parents who struggle to raise their children with Christian principles and beliefs? Then your articles would be real and down to earth. James & Ruth Ann Niemann Farmington, Mo. • Venus' father double-faults USA WEEKEND recently featured a great cover story about Venus Williams and her family, including her father and coach, Richard ("The new first family of tennis," April 10-12), in which Richard Williams is quoted as calling another player competing against his daughter in the U.S. Open "a big, ugly, tall white turkey." He should be ashamed of himself. We do not need racist remarks, black or white. Name-calling is not acceptable. Joseph Hennessey Napa, Calif. Write to USA WEEKEND, 1000 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Va. 222290012 (fax 703-276-5518; e-mail: letteis@usaweekend.com).You must include your full name, city, state, and daytime phone number, with area code. Letters may be edited for clarity and space. E3 June 12-14,1998 13

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