The Hays Daily News from Hays, Kansas on September 19, 2002 · Page 6
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Hays Daily News from Hays, Kansas · Page 6

Publication:
Location:
Hays, Kansas
Issue Date:
Thursday, September 19, 2002
Page:
Page 6
Start Free Trial
Cancel

A6 • THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 19,2002 THE HAYS DAILY NEWS FOR THE RECORD Deaths Ecil L Summers GRAINFIELD — Ecil L. Summers, died Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2002, at the Gove County Medical Center Long Term Care Unit. She was born Feb. 6, 1923, in southern Gove County to August Bellmar and Lela Mae (Van Pelt) Finch. She attended West Lone Star Rural School in Gove County She married Oliver George Summers on Dec. 15,1944, in Oberlin. He died June 8,1982. She was a certified medication aide at Gove County Medical Center, Quinter. She attended the United Methodist Churches in Grainfield and Winona. Survivors include three sons, Lonnie, Bunker Hill, Jerry, Grainfield, and Bill Summers, Quinter; a daughter, Dixie Taylor, Delaware, Ohio; a brother, Chancy Finch, Garden City; three sisters, Betty Holaday, Oakley, Arlene Goppert, Assaria, and Twila Patterson, Oakley; 13 grandchildren; 28 great-grandchildren; and a great- great-grandchild. She was preceded in death by four brothers, Everet, Wayne, Donnie and Alvin Finch, a son, Bobby Summers, and a sister, Margaret Segal. Services will be at 2 p.m. Saturday at Church of the Brethren, Quinter, with the Rev. Keith Funk officiating; burial in Gove Cemetery. Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Friday at Schmitt Funeral Home, Quinter. Memorials are suggested to the American Heart Association or American Diabetes Association. Virginia M.Krueger HAYS—Virginia M. Krueger, 82, died Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2002, at Hays Medical Center. She was born Jan. 14,1920 in Ellis to Charles 0. and Agnes A. (Befort) Anderson. She married William H. Krueger on April 27,1946, in Two Rivers, Wis. She was a retired registered nurse and member of St. Mary Catholic Church, Ellis. She had been an Ellis and Hays area resident since 1972, coming from Two Rivers. Survivors include her husband, of the home; a brother, Clyde Anderson, Two Rivers; two grandchildren; and two stepgrandchildren. She was preceded in death by a son, Charles W, a brother, Clarence Anderson, and a sister, Pauline Anderson. Services will be at 10 a.m. Saturday at St. Mary Catholic Church, Ellis, with Father Larry Letourneau officiating; burial in the church cemetery Visitation will be from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday and 9 to 9:30 a.m. Saturday at Wasinger Funeral Chapel, Ellis. A rosary will be at 7 p.m. Friday at the funeral chapel. Memorials are suggested to the church. ADDITIONAL SERVICES HAYS — Eugene "Gene" Lelker, 80, died Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2002, at his home. Services will be at 10 a.m. Friday at Immaculate Heart of Mary, Catholic Church; burial in St. Joseph Cemetery, Hays. A parish vigil service will be at 6:30 p.m. today at Hays Memorial Chapel Funeral Home, 20th and Pine. Visitation will be from 5 to 8 p.m. today and 9 to 9:45 a.m. Friday at the funeral home. WILSON — Aria M. Langerman, 93, died Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2002, at Wilson Nursing Center. Services will be at 2 p.m. Friday at Foster Mortuary Chapel, Wilson; burial in Wilson City Cemetery. Visitation will be until 8 p.m. today and from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday at the chapel. OAKLEY —Walburga "Burgle" Albers, 91, died Sunday, Sept. 15, 2002, at Logan County Hospital. Services will be at 10:30 a.m. Friday at St. Joseph Catholic Church, Oakley; burial in St. Joseph Cemetery, Oakley. Visitation will be until 5 p.m. today at Kennedy-Koster Funeral Home, Oakley, and from 6 to 9 p.m. today at the church. A rosary will be at 7:30 p.m. today at the church. PLAINVILLE — Leslie Lee "Les" Hosier, 46, died Friday, Sept. 13, 2002, at Wesley Medical Center. Services will be at 2 p.m. Friday at Moore-Overlease Funeral Chapel, Plainville. There will be no visitation. For obituaries 24 hours a day, go to: obits.hdnews.net online obituaries brought to you by: INSIDE C.S. POST & CO. - HAYS I 7 W. 1 ITH ST. ' 785.6Z8.3OOO SPOST.COM TEENS: Volunteers come from many places • CONTINUED FROM PAGE Al "Every year we evaluate where we stand and where we're hoping to go, so every year we have to look at the data. We realize we've made some gain," Knoll said. She notes, though,' that the Partnership has its work cut out for it and the effort to keep kids from substance abuse is an ongoing task. Cindi Geist, executive director of Smoky Hill Foundation for Chemical Dependency, said the partnership's earliest beginnings were a training session with 24 people attending. The volunteers came from the high school, courts, law enforcement, parents and the business community. "You look at your own attitudes and beliefs and you also look at the impact alcohol has on the community and the family, and you discover what addiction really is. The very last part of the program is, you look at how do you make change occur," Geist said. At the next meeting a month and a half later, they looked at what sectors of the community were missing from the group, Geist said. They invited people from those areas to participate and then applied for funding grants. Significant funding was received in 1994, and the partnership hired a staff person. Later, as additional money was available, the partnership began various programs, such as helping Big Brothers Big Sisters of Ellis County start in 2000 and helping YouthFriends start in 2001. An Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention grant that currently is the Part- nership's main funding source will end hi September 2004, Geist said. After that, the money they now give to after-school programs, parenting programs, mentoring programs and the like won't be there unless Geist can find additional funding. "That's what I'm working on right now," Geist said. "We've seen a lot of things change. And that's been good. What they say is, it takes 10 years to really see things change. We're always going to see different — or new — drug problems happen." IRAQ: Bush says cesQlutiQji f is,not(leclafation of war •i . ,|^«»» : . . .... f .. ,,,?.- -.•;,'.( i ., :i"r- ' '••}•- .i.^f- ;>••> -t . '--"i.v i '*-•-• •"• ».;?•;• ' -vf • • .•-''' •—'•*-' ' ti^-'••••-* i > •."'• ,'• ' ' • • • > • • • ••••(( •>.'•.. • -. ' i • • 'CONTINUED FROM PAGE Al The president also stressed he is not on the verge of declaring war, said Rep. John McHugh, R- N.Y. "The most important word I heard inside today from the president was the word 'if.' He made it repeatedly clear that this resolution is not intended as a declaration of war, it-is not intended as an immediate prior step to aggression," said McHugh. Bush spoke to reporters after meeting with Secretary of State Colin Powell on his difficult diplomatic effort to draft a U.N. Security Council resolution against Iraq. The administration has to overcome strong reservations by Russia and France, which have veto power in the Security Council. "The United Nations Security Council must work with the United States and other concerned parties to send a clear messfige..,th|tt we expect Saddam to disarm," Bush said. "And if the United Nations Security Council won't deal with the problem, the United States and some of our friends will," he declared. The gap between Russian and American viewpoints was underlined today in comments by Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov. Upon arriving at the Pentagon to meet with Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, Ivanov said he believed U.N. weapons inspectors will succeed in settling the question of whether Iraq has weapons of mass destruction. "Being experienced in that sort of business — both Americans and Russians — I think we can easily establish (whether) there exist or not weapons of mass destruction technology," Ivanov said. Rumsfeld, who stood by silently as Ivanov spoke, has said repeatedly that inspections cannot be 100-percent reliable because Iraq has a long history of deceiving inspectors. And Bush lashed out at the notion that Iraq is in talks with the United Nations about resuming inspections: "There are no negotiations to be held with Iraq. ... I don't trust Iraq and neither should the free world." He declined to name any of the allies he's counting on for support in the event of war, saying only that "time will tell." As Bush spoke, White House advisers were behind the scenes telephoning congressional leaders with notice that Bush's proposal was on its way to Capitol Hill. Following his meeting with Powell, Vice President Dick Cheney and National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice, Bush lobbied the small group of lawmakers — something Rice, too, planned to do with other groups latertoday. Bush said he wanted the legislature to give him not only the power to make war with Sad- dam, but also an explicit restatement of U.S..policy that Saddam must be overthrown. "That's the policy of the government," Bush said, adding that he wanted Congress' approval before lawmakers adjourn to campaign for the Nov. 5 elections. But on Capitol Hill today, a group of House Democrats condemned the move toward military action, with Rep. Dennis Kucinich, D-Ohio, calling it "unjustified, unwarranted and illegal." Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., said she was introducing a resolution with 20 cosponsors calling on the United States to work with the U.N. to carry out weapons inspections in Iraq. "A preemptive, unilateral first strike would set a terrible international precedent," she said. Lotteries Powerball None of the tickets sold for the Powerball game Wednesday night matched all six numbers drawn: 6-27-32-42-44 Powerball: 10 Power Play: 5 The prize goes to an estimated $12 million for Saturday. Picks The winning numbers in Wednesday's Kansas Lottery "Daily Pick 3" game: 7-3-7 Super Kansas Cash No player hit the jackpot Wednesday night in the "Super Kansas Cash" drawing, worth an estimated $100,000. 2-12-14-23-32 Super Cashball: 1 The next Kansas Cash drawing will be worth an estimated $110,000. No player won the grand prize Wednesday night in the Kansas "2 by 2" drawing, worth $20,000. Red Numbers: 1-18 White Numbers: 14-23 Three numbers were picked by ' 16 players, with each ticket worth $100. Police Report Possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia were reported at 27th and Vine Sept. 16. A 38-year-old Hays man •'as arrested. Attorneys begin narrowing jury pool By JOHN MILBURN ASSOCIATED PRESS OLATHE — A second round of questioning has revealed the extent the public is aware of the lurid allegations in the murder case against John E. Robinson Sr. Jury selection resumed today with more than 100 people explaining why serving on the trial will cause personal hardship and they should be excused from further consideration. After more than seven hours of screening Wednesday, attorneys had processed 37 potential jurors. More than 300 people were excused Monday and Tuesday. Judge John Anderson III said the second round of questioning was critical. Robinson, 58, is charged with killing Suzette Trouten and Izabela Lewicka, whose bodies were found decomposing in barrels on land Robinson owned in Linn County. He's also charged with killing Lisa Stasi, who has been missing for 17 years. He faces the death penalty. Six at a time, potential jurors sat in the jury box and discussed their exposure to the case, their attitudes toward the death penalty and their views on sadomasochistic sex, an activity Robinson is alleged to have been involved in. Many of those excused stated they had decided Robinson was guilty based on media reports on the case. Other said they would vote for a death sentence despite any efforts by Robinson's attorneys to show cause for giving him life in prison, Eleven people — nine men and two women — were kept Wednesday for the next round of questioning. Twelve jurors and five alter- nates are needed. In all, 51 potential jurors are needed for the final round of questioning, because of "strikes" each side can use to remove jurors. Jury selection is now expected to last much of a second week, with Robinson's trial running as long as six weeks. Anderson said it was still possible that the remaining 600 potential jurors from the 1,200 originally summoned might be called back. Defense attorney Patrick Berrigan said the media coverage since Robinson's arrest June 2,2000, had painted Robinson in a bad light. Earlier motions to move the trial or dismiss all 1,200 potential jurors because of the publicity have been denied. The defense has said that it will present evidence that Robin, son suffered from one or more mental conditions that could have impaired his behavior. Father nabs peeping torn using fishing line WICHITA (AP) — A father who became convinced someone was watching his daughters, ages 6 and 15, as they showered at night, nabbed the peeping torn using fishing line. The 37-year-old husband and father would only identify himself as Brian because he has two daughters and doesn't want attention drawn to them. It all started when Brian's wife noticed that a backyard chair kept being moved under a bathroom window overnight. Brian said he tied one end of a spool of fishing line to the leg of the chair. He snaked the fishing line into the house, leaving the spool on the kitchen counter. About 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, he got a bite. The spool fell off the counter and began unraveling. Brian grabbed a piece of pipe and quietly slipped outside, he said. Peering around a corner, he watched a man fumbling with the chair, pulling it up to the window. Brian stepped forward and ordered the man to lie down while his wife called police. Police arrived and took the 31- year-old man, who turned out to live a few houses away, to the Sedgwick County Jail. Stocks Bad economic news hits stocks hard NEW YORK (AP) — Another spate of bad economic news, brokerage downgrades and profit declines further demoralized in- •estors today and sent stock >rices tumbling. "Investors' emotions continue o drive the market.... All you see s negative news," said Thomas E iydon Jr., president of Global Trends Investments in Newport Beach, Calif., citing earnings warnings by Electronic Data Sys- ems, a weak housing report and the possibility of war with Iraq. "Investors on Wall Street are clamoring for good news that just sn't there." At midday, the Dow Jones industrial average was down 103.97, or 1.3-percent, at 8,068.48, having ost 207.73 in the previous two sessions. The Dow last traded below !,000 on Aug. 5, but has not closed jelow that level since hitting its July 23 low Of 7,702.34. The Dow has lost nearly 1,000 points since its recent peak on Aug. 22 as mixed economic re- ports and worries about war with Iraq have eroded investors confidence. The broader market also pulled back today. The Nasdaq composite index fell 16.50, or 1.3-percent, to 1,235.63. The Standard & Poor's 500 index declined 12.82, or 1.5- percent, to 856.64. It's been more than a week — since Sept. 10 — that all three indexes have ended a session higher. Investors have been skittish about committing to stocks with the possibility of war with Iraq and third-quarter earnings results looming. Disappointing economic news has dashed investors' hopes, and contributed to today's slide on Wall Street. The Commerce Department reported that housing construction dropped 2.2-percent last month, surprising analysts who'd expected a 1.8-percent increase. Homebuilders such as Lennar, down $1.80 at $54.85, were among Wall Street's losers. NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE Most active stocks at noon (11 a.m. Central time) Sales High Low Last Chg AMR 26078 6.00 5.36 5.41—.41 AOL TW 55754 12.78 12.50 12.61—.22 AT&T .15 30272 12.65 12.35 12.46—.18 ATT Wrts 40846 4.86 4.46 4.56—.39 AblLab .94 15912 40.33 39.59 40.24—.18 Accenture 40668 14.90 13.9014.03—1.86 AMD 15310 6.75 6.50 6.54—.24 AflCmpS S 34601 43.25 41.0041.57—3.45 AgereB n 21101 1.11 1.03 1.03—.16 Alcoa .60 25550 20.74 20.10 20.30—.63 AEP 2.40 11007 29.60 28.97 29.50+ .04 AmExp .32 22650 32.44 31.60 32.17—.29 AmlntGp .19f 28401 58.68 57.99 58.41—.33 Americdt 15310 7.50 7.00 7.18+ .13 AnalogDev 17301 21.26 20.53 20.63—.72 Anheusr .781 14479 51.87 51.10 51.19—.94 Apache .40b 10606 57.00 56.01 56.80+ .23 AuloDala .46 19211 35.61 34.50 35.32—.45 BJ Svc 10741 27.15 26.13 27.07+ .32 BP PLC 1.47e 25110 41.15 39.99 40.43—.71 BakrHu .46 11293 28.10 27.36 27.94+ .23 BankOne .84 16202 37.88 37.50 37.66—.76 Bk Of Am 2.40 32449 65.10 64.2064.48—1.82 BkNY .76 10958 30.27 29.71 29.73—1.33 BarrickG .22 11905 17.43 17.10 17.35 + .32 BellSouth .801 16893 22.69 22.10 22.24—.43 BeslBuy s 44768 24.60 23.30 24.51 + .51 Boeing .68 13778 36.50 35.81 36.15—.62 BrMySq 1.12 21203 24,84 24.29 24.29—.57 CablvsnNY 11558 10.81 10.20 10.39—.57 Calplne 29840 3.70 3.31 3.65+ .22 CapOne .11 17903 35.73 34.80 35.19—.80 Carnival .42 12932 24.74 23.7023.74—1.01 Calerplllr 1.40 13102 38.65 37.85 38.65—.36 Celesllc g 13808 16.24 15.00 15.19—.39 Cendant 18391 13.83 13.40 13.43—.65 CirCtyCC .07 12860 15.74 14.92 15.62+ .10 Citigrp .72b 11279228.6027.7428.00—1.11 CocaCI .8030804 48.30 47.0447.50—1.80 CompAs .07 29727 10.12 9.35 9.42—1.02 CompSci 29721 31.50 30.1030.68-^1.48 ionAgra .94 11783 26.02 25.00 25.19—.82 Coming 40402 1.76 1.67 1.70—.07 Darden s .05 12397 24.75 23.56 24.34 + .79 DellaAIr .10 10763 13.05 12.40 12.78+ .01 Disney .21 21092 15.49 15.16 15.27—47 DollarG .13 10234 14.35 13.99 14.05—.23 DowChm 1.34 11394 29,30 28.70,29.09—.08 , DuPont 1.40 12012 39.54 38.87 39.21— .81 DukeEgy t.10' '26509'22.69 21 ;9V 21.96^.66 Dynegy. . ..15| 82448 1.55 1.40 1.41—.19 EMC Cp 87477 5.46 5.17 5.37—.03 ElPasbCp .87 16992 14.'17 13.81 14.09—.31 Elan 21932 2.35 2.25 2.27—.18 EDS .6031086323.2019.9520.04—16.42 EDS pfl 3.80e 16020 24.8323.0023.65—13.41 ExxonMbl .92 38175 32.93 32.55 32.76—.44 FanniMae 1.32 27333 68.36 66.40 68.10 + .50 FedExCp .05p 3535648.0044.1847.85 + 5.05 FstData S .082683431.7430.9931.06—1.47 FleetBost 1.40 16278 21.80 21.22 21.27—88 FordM .40 47020 10.13 9.93 9.97—.29 FredMac .88 23708 61.00 60.11 60.80—.01 GenElec .72 104291 27.09 26.70 26.87—48 GnMotr 2 16598 44.01 42.91 43.78+ .04 GaPacit .50 18176 15.30 14.66 14.88—.53 GlaxoSKIn 1.26e 14457 35.95 35.33 35.66—1.91 GoldFLId .29e 10688 14.55 14.03 14.21+.10 GoldmanS .48 29184 69.39 67.7568.10—2.31 Guidant 11863 35.22 34.81 34.85—1.01 Hlthsth 134648 3.71 3.10 3.49—.67 Hewlett? .32 39799 12.96 12.56 12.85—.54 HomeDp .20f 38901 33.50 32.66 33.09—.09 Honwlllnll .75 19918 23.64 23.10 23.23—.77 HostMarr 11019 10.02 9.79 10.00 + .14 Sales High Low Last Chg Houshlnt 11 26583 29.85 28.38 29.47—.38 HovnanEnt 14938 39.05 347934.87-4.18 IBM .60 122389 65.64 64.50 65.39-4.16 IntPap 1 29887 33.88 33.10 33.54—.01 Interpublic .38 2169016.7715.8915.95—1.32 JPMorgCh 1.36 8431920.34 19.51 19.52—92 Jabil 10744 17.00 16.10 16.92+ .09 JohnJn .82 24839 53.70 52.85 52.88—.97 Kroger 20296 15.50 15.02 15.39+ .09 LSI Log 18012 7.06 6.78 6.90—.15 LehmBr .36 14046 51.77 50.61 51.03—1.76 Lennar .051675655.8554.2354.80—1.85 LillyEli 1.24 1338756.6655.3755.68—1.39 LowesCos .08 18805 44.44 43.85 44.09—.72 Lucent .861 255767 .93 .87 .92—02 MBNA s .281 15567 18.95 18.40 18.76—.43 MarlntA .28 15870 30.37 29.2629.42—1.08 Masco .56(3623324.11 21.7421.81—2.50 McDnlds .231 72543 18.40 17.80 18.03—.13 Medlrnic .25 13371 41.83 41.30 41.79—.27 Merck 1.44(2163046.9045.7546.00—1.06 MerrillLyn .64 28635 34.85 34.1034.19—1.32 MetLile .20 37922 24.00 23.11 23.91+ .79 MicronT 24411 15.73 15.15 15.35—.35 Mirant 18131 2.90 2.66 2.72—.04 . MorgSlan .92 62575 36.70 34.86 35.08—3.02 Motorola .16 36477 10.54 10.24 10.34—.45 NtSemi 12434 12.36 11.65 12.06 + .13 NewellRub .84 10929 33.50 32.41 32.60—.40 NewrntM .12 22444 28.98 28.45 28.81 + .65 NikeB .48 10493 43.97 42.60 43.94+ .89 NokiaCp .246 35050 12.78 12.50 12.61—.33 NortelNw 108173 .82 .74 .76—.05 ParkHan .72 16465 37.81 35.95 37.76+ .90 PepsiCo .60 35216 37.79 34.00 37.30—.75 Pfizer .52 52593 29.45 28.94 29.27—18 Pharmacia .54b 1785439.4738.60 39.26—.24 PhilMor 2.56f 4204246.3545.5445.63—1.44 ProctG 1.641 13087 92.41 91.25 91.95—.15 Prudentl n 14329 28.85 28.00 28.12—.84 QweslCm 122484 2.94 2.46 2.52—45 RoylDut 1.57e 22650 40.98 40.15 40.80—.43 SAP AG .13612956 13.25 12.8513.07—1.11 SBC Com 1.0822682 24.34 23.69 23.80—.37 STMicro .036 11275 15.21 14.85 14.98—.62 Safeway 13743 23.69 23.06 23.50+ .23 SchergPI .68 10733 22.73 22.24 22.47—50 Schlmb .75 21739 40.86 39.86 40.62—.69 ' Schwab-.... .04 14466- 8.93, 8.62..8.74--;33,j-, Solectm ""•' 20572 2.45 2.18 230—.08 SpmtFON '.50 32786 9.61 8.85 8.90—.87 •• SpmtPCS 60721 2.98 2.73 2.75—.23 • . Sysco .3640792 30.34 28.7029.24—1.06 TaiwSemi 16601 7.10 6.90 7.01—.09 Target .24 12904 35.44 35.02 35.19—.78 Teradyn 25246 11.05 10.48 10.56—.49 Texlnst .09 57515 17.63 16.90 17.25—.36 3M Co 2.48 13046 119.55 116.70 119.03 + .68 Transocn .12 19437 21.79 21.13 21.23—.48 Travel A n 14913 13.25 12.82 12.94—.40 Travel B n 13216 13.42 13.01 13.08—.39 Tycolntl .05 68038 16.82 15.50 15.78—.14 UPS B .762641963.6061.8663.49 + 1.64 US Bancrp .78 13350 19.65 19.20 19.42—36 UtdhlthG .03 12323 91.15 90.21 90.39—1.41 VerizonCm 1.54 20200 30.05 29.50 29.55—.63 ViacomB 15764 40.95 40.0040.01—1.23 Wachovia 1.041 2802533.41 32.3932.60—1.53 WalMart .30 31290 54.69 53.82 54.28—.10 Walgm .15 11759 33.60 33.06 33.23—.75 WA Mull 1.08f 19742 33.10 32.55 32.76—.26 WellsFrgo 1.12 20663 47.04 46.49 46.72—.70 WmsCos .04m 16912 2.49 2.19 2.39 + .12 Wyeth .922193239.5437.9938.28—1.36 Xerox 11065 6.99 6.81 6.88—.14 Midday markets LOCAL INTEREST Courtesy Darren 0. Selbel, Edward Jones Price Change Alltell Corp 44.08 -.38 Anheuser Busch 51.15 -.98 Aqulla 4.64 + .04 Almos Energy Common 21.49 -.01 BankAmerica Corp 64.61 -1.69 Baxter 32.41 +.08 BP 40.44 -.70 Caremark Rx 17.23 -.32 Cinergy 32.80 +.16 Commerce 39.96 -.97 ConAgra 25.13 -.88 Deere & Co 46.25 -.44 Dutf&Phelp 9.97 -.03 El Paso Corp 14.20 -.20 Halliburton 13.84 -.14 Kinder Morgan 37.15 -1.08 LIVESTOCK Courtesy DACO Inc. Est. Cattle slaughtered 129,000 Choice 3 beef (cut out) 114.13 Western Kansas cattle 66.00 Peorlahogs 26.50 CHICAGO MERCANTILE Courtesy DACO Inc. Prev High Live Beef Cattle October 69.87 December 72.50 February 73.20 April 73.40 Feeder Cattle September 81.10 October November January Hogs October December February April Pork bellies February 69.60 March 68.60 May 70.35 OIL 81.40 81.75 79.92 36.65 38.00 44.97 50.42 Prev Low 69.55 72.10 72.97 73.15 80.85 80.90 81.32 79.50 35.37 36.72 43.752 49.95 68.45 68.60 70.00 cents per pound Noon Quote Prev Close 69.72 69.60 72.32 71.92 73.12 72.95 73.27 73.10 81.10 81.10 81.57 79.70 36.50 37.95 44.52 50.15 69.22 68.60 70.00 81.12 81.12 81.50 79.75 37.40 38.67 45.25 50.40 70.35 70.10 71.05 Courtesy Daco Inc. dollars per barrel Western Kansas Crude, poon quote .. 25.00 NY spot crude, noon quote 29.24 -.24 DODGE CITY LIVESTOCK DODGE CITY (AP) — Receipts: 1,249'Last Week: 1,916 Last Year 2,021 Compared with last week: Feeder steers and heifers not enough of any class for an accurate market test, however a firm to higher undertone noted on a few Medium and Large 1. Slaughter cows 1.00-1.50 higher. Slaughter bulls too few for test. Trade and demand moderate. Receipts 43 percent 600 Ibs and over; 51 percent 600 Ibs and under; 06 percent cows and bulls with 75 head early. Feeder supply 43 percent steers and 57 percent heifers, Feeder Steers: (Figures In parentheses are weighted average prices) Medium and Large 1:7 head 644 Ibs 82.50. Noon quotes Price Change Kellwood Co 24.68 -.41 Kroger 15.50 +.20 McDonald's 18.10 -.06 Microsoft 47.70 -.05 Northwest Nat. Gas 28.73 -.01 Oakwood Homes 1.76 + .06 Raytheon Co 34.70 -.62 SBC Communications lnc.24.16 ..-.01 Semco Energy Inc 8.70 -.10 Southwest Gas Corp 222.01 -.14 Sprint Corp 9.00 -.77 Sysco Corp 29.10 -1.11 Sykes Enterprises, Inc 5.83 -.17 Union Pacific 59.72 + 1.42 Wal-Mart 54.75- + .37 Westar Energy 10.61 -.12 HAYS CASH GRAINS Courtesy Midland Marketing dollars Local cash wheat 4.46 Local cash mllo 4.51 KANSAS CITY WHEAT Courtesy DACO Inc. dollars per bushel Prev Prev Prev Noon High Low Close Quote December 4.76 4.559 4.71% 4.70V4 March 4.68% 4.49 4.58% 4.56% May 4.33% 4.22 4.28 4.28 CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE Courtesy DACO Inc. 'Prev High Wheat December 4.19 March 4.19 May 3.96% Corn December 2.77 March 2.83 May 2.85% Soybeans November 5.77 January 5.80% March 5.81 % Soybean meal October 185.60 December 185.90 January 185.60 Oats December 2.03% March 1.99% May 1.96 Prev Prev Noon Low Close Quote dollars per bushel 4.05 4.13 4.10 4.06 4.12% 74.10% 3.86 3.92% 3.89 dollars per bushel 2.71 % 2.72 2.69% 2.78% 2.79'/i 2.76% 2.81% 2.82'/4 2.79% dollars per bushel 5.70'/4 5.72 5.68% 5.73% 5.76 5.72 5.75 5.77 5.73 dollars per Ion 182.90 184.40 182.30 183.10 184.60 182.40 183.00 184.40 .182.50 dollars per bushel 2.00% 2.03% 2:04% 1.96 1.99 2.00 1.96 1.96 1.96 METALS NEW YORK (AP) — .Spot nonferrous metal prices today. Aluminum - 59.1 cents per Ib., London Metal Exch. Wed. Copper -67.00 cents per Ib., N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Lead - .45 cents per Ib. Zinc - 39.84-40.34 cents Ib., delivered. Gold - $320.60 troy oz., NY Merc spot Wed. Silver • $4.819 troy oz., N.Y. Mere spot Wed. Mercury - $154.00 per 76 Ib flask, N.Y. Platinum $554.20 troy oz., N.Y, Merc spot Wed.

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 9,800+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free