The Hays Daily News from Hays, Kansas on June 19, 2006 · Page 6
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The Hays Daily News from Hays, Kansas · Page 6

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A6 THE. HAYS DAILY NEWS FOR THE RECORD MONDAY, JUNE 19,2006 Obituaries Hilda Wolf Hilda Wolf, 83, Hays, formerly of Grainfield, died Saturday, June 17, 2006, at Good Samaritan Center, Hays. She was born Dec. 19,1922, in Pfeifer to Joseph and Emma (Mader) Schmidtberger. She attended country schools and was a 1940 graduate of Grainfield High School. She married Bernard J. Wolf on Nov. 19,1946, in Grainfield. She was a homemaker. Survivors include her husband, of the home; two sons, Randall J. Wolf, Hays, and Bernard L. Wolf, Grainfield; four daughters, Ronda Kaiser, Quinter, Charlene Williams, Tulsa, Okla., Donna Albers, Oakley, and Judy Ziegler, Ellis; a brother, Victor Schmidtberger, Grainfield; two sisters, Marcella Heier, Park, and Irene Ziegler, Grainfield; 19 grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by a daughter, Mary Wolf. Services will be at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday at St. Agnes Catholic Church, Grainfield; burial in Grainfield Cemetery. Visitation will be from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at St. Agnes Education Center, Grainfield. A vigil service will be at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the education center. Memorials are suggested to Hays Good Samaritan Center and Alzheimer's Association of the Great Plains, in care of Schmitt Funeral Home, 901 S. Main, Quinter, KS 67752. Sister Agnes Claire Basgall Sister Agnes Claire Basgall, Wichita, died Saturday, June 17, 2006. She was born Oct. 28,1925, in Loretta to Alois G. and Mary (Weber) Basgall. She earned a master of science degree in nursing education. She was a retired registered nurse in various health care ministries and was serving on the board of directors of Villa Maria, Mulvane, and St. Joseph Villa, David City, Neb. Survivors include three sisters, Mildred Brungardt, Victoria, Esther Smith, Lakewood, Colo., and Alvina Engel, Lake Havasu City, Ariz.; three sisters-in-law, Betty Basgall, Victoria, Isabel Basgall,- La Crosse, and Martina Herrman, Hays; numerous nieces, nephews and friends; and Sisters of the ASC Community. Services will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday at Adorers of the Blood of Christ, 1165 Southwest Blvd., Wichita. Visitation will be from 2 to 7 p.m. Tuesday at Adorers of the ADimoNAi SERVICES Stocks dip on lack of economic data Mary Lola Gross, 89, Novato, Calif., A former Russell resident, died Thursday, May 11,2006, In Novato. Services will be at 3 p.m. July 2 at the First Congregational Church, Russell. Cleal "Dode" Harrison, 94, Oakley, died Wednesday, June 14, 2006, at Windsor of Lawrence. Memorial services will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, June 24, at Oakley First United Methodist Church; private in- urnment will follow at a later date. Nadyne Calvert Gibson, 90, Long Beach, Calif., died Wednesday, May 31, 2006, at her son's home In Grand Junction, Colo. Memorial services will be at 10 a.m. July 1 at Los Altos Methodist Church, Long Beach. Tracy Lea Rlckerson Caldwell, 36, Canon City, Colo., died Wednesday, June 14, 2006, at Saint Mary-Cor- Blood of Christ, with a wake service at 7 p.m. Memorials are suggested for win Hospital, Pueblo, Colo. Services will be at 10 a.m. Wednesday at Waugh-Yokum Funeral Home, 16 N. Buckeye, lola, KS 66749. Harold "Dean" Williams, 59, WaKeeney, died Saturday, June 10, 2006, at Veterans Hospital, Wichita. Memorial services will be at 10a.m. Tuesday at Stinemetz Funeral Home, 522 Pomeroy, Hill City. Following services, his cremains will be buried at Kansas Veterans Cemetery, WaKeeney, as well as his wife's cre- mains. Full military honors will be given by 24th Infantry Division, Fort Riley. The Hays Daily News will publish a basic, standard obituary free of charge for people with direct ties to the newspaper's circulation area. If survivors desire to add Information to an obituary, they may do so for an additional charge. Completely custom obituaries are handled as paid advertising. For more Information, call (785) 628-1081. the retirement of Sisters, ASC, 1165 Southwest Blvd., Wichita, KS 67213. UP uses training, gravity, rewards Railroad company figuring out ways to conserve fuel By JOSH FUNK ASSOCIATED PRESS OMAHA, Neb. — When a new Union Pacific engineer gets into the simulator, the trainer lets the student drive a virtual train 20 miles without much instruction. Then the education begins. The lessons are important because engineers have a significant effect on how much fuel is burned by the railroad's 8,000 locomotives. And that adds up quickly, because the railroad burns about 3.25 million gallons of dieseladay ?i low. engineers some, techniques that sound fa- , miliar to motorists facing gasoline price spikes and concerns about gas mileage. Strategies such as accelerating slowly, limiting time spent idling and trying to anticipate conditions ahead are just as useful on rails as on highways. But the most important lesson for engineers is also one of the simplest: "You let gravity do a lot of work for your train," West said. Last year, Union Pacific's program to encourage engineers to conserve fuel helped the railroad save 16 million gallons of diesel and $30 million. And that's with only about half the engineers participating. The first quarter of 2006 saw Union Pacific haul more freight than a year ago while using roughly the same amount of fuel — a first for the company The railroad hauled about 2 percent more freight during the first quarter of this year while using 345 million gallons of fuel, which is up slightly from the 344 million gallons used during last year's first quarter. Encouraging engineers to change the way they drive is one part of Union Pacific's efforts to conserve diesel. The railroad also invested in about 1,900 fuel-efficient locomotives since 2000 and overhauled another 1,300 of its older units to be more efficient. !^^4ftipM^ .•are taking similar measures because fuel costs can erode profits. "Clearly every railroad in America is trying to save fuel," Paterson said. The nation's second-largest railroad, Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp., also teaches its engineers techniques to help conserve diesel, spokesman Steve Forsberg said, but it doesn't offer financial incentives to employees. The Fort Worth, Texas, railroad has also bought more than 2,500 new locomotives over the past few years, Forsberg said. To help recover the soaring cost of fuel, Union Pacific has surcharges in most of its contracts. Still, diesel is a significant expense for the railroad, which last year spent nearly $2.6 billion on fuel and utilities. Union Pacific used about 1.35 billion gallons of diesel in 2005. Union Pacific's surcharges recover about 90 percent of the railroad's costs above 75 cents per gallon. Paterson said that industrywide, railroads recover about 75 percent of their costs when the price of diesel increases. The industry didn't start adding surcharges until 2002, so any contracts older than that still don't have them. In that 20-mile simulator run used in Union Pacific training, some 80 gallons of diesel fuel can be saved by changing the way an engineer drives, . ;; ,..• 4 ..- , WesJ, and, Canaday ,bjo,th spend^'i*]!ttfiqSr'i 1 ; ii .time training engineers in Morrill, Neb., and.— the rest driving trains back and forth between western Nebraska and the coal-rich northeast corner of Wyoming. The rolling hills give engineers a chance to use gravity to their advantage by building speed on the downhill side of a hill, but there's not much engineers can do about long grades. Those still require full power, Canaday said. The trainers said speed was another key factor in conserving fuel. West said the locomotives, like cars, generally get better fuel efficiency at lower speeds. NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street drifted lower in aimless trading today as a lack of economic news left investors struggling to preserve momentum from last week's recovery. Oil prices declined and the U.S. dollar showed strength against other currencies, but the market found little direction without any new economic data to feed speculation over the Federal Reserve's next interest rate decision, expected next week. "I think the market is just going to try and stabilize. I don't see much happening until we get into earnings season." said Peter Cardillo, chief strategist for S.W. Bach & Co., who added that weakness in the bond market was likely weighing on stocks. Investors had a mild reaction to the day's corporate headlines, which included a joint venture between Nokia Corp. and Siemens AG and solid earnings from electronics retailer Circuit City Stores Inc. Brokers' upgrades of Intel Corp. and Procter & Gamble Co. also gave the Dow Jones industrials some support. The major Indexes ended mixed last week after a two-day bounce helped Wall Street find its footing following almost six weeks of Intense selling on fears of rising inflation and a slowing economy. Investors seemed to be coming to terms with increased certainty that the Fed will boost interest rates again at its meeting next Wednesdy and Thursday. In midday trading, the Dow fell 19.11, or 0.17 percent, to 10,995.14, after opening the session with a modest gain. Wall Street's reversal carried the Dow 1.13 percent higher last week. Broader stock indicators also gave up earlier gains. The Standard & Poor's 500 index was down 3.75, or 0.3 percent, at 1,247.79, and the Nasdaq composite index dropped 4.64, or 0.22 percent, to 2,125.31. NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE PLOT: School's principal questioned some students Most active itockt it noon (11 a.m. Central Urn*) Sales High Low Last Chg AMR 23021 24.60 23.84 24.49 + .70 AT&T Inc 1.33 58709 28.03 27.79 28.01 +.22 Accenlure ,30e 13161 26.17 25.68 26.09+.31 AMD 44716 26.02 25.28 25.56—.06 Aetna s .021 13053 39.75 38.94 39.07—.16 AffCmpS 15379 49.73 48.89 49.43+ .53 AlbertoCul .521 2536149.5047.4547.90+1.22 Alcan .6013865 44.10 42.01 42.47—1.85 Alcoa .60 27413 30.06 28.96 29.25—.84 AllegTch .40 1705565.5961.9662.48—2.34 Altria 3.20 23922 71.62 71.15 71.52 + .64 AMovilL 8 .846 1930630.75 29.44 29.76—.49 AmExp .601 21054 52.97 52.24 52.54—.38 AmlnlQp II .661 2156660.1559.56 59.60—.07 AmTower 15909 30.39 29.51 29.60—.52 Anadark s .36 16210 48.08 46.51 46.67—1.35 Apache .40 16562 61.01 58.8959.11—2.13 Aquila 16348 4.25 4.07 4.10—.05 ArchC s .24 14919 40.99 38.41 38.96—1.65 ArchDan .40 18884 39.64 38.33,38.69—.39 BJ Svcs s .2024527 35.73 33.8934.11—1.81 BP PLC 2.2081471666.7965.2565.46—1.24 BakrHu .52 18933 79.95 77.0077.44—2.50 BkofAm 2 45113 47.93 47.37 47.47+ .05 BarrickG .22 17899 27.72 27.10 27.44-28 BellSouth 1.16 20900 36.42 36.02 36.39 + .31 BestBuy s .32 20208 53.13 52.45 53.09+ .64 1.20 22766 86.23 84.75 84.90—.64 38649 20.40 19.82 19.98—.11 1.12 21190 25.41 25.15 25.40+ .22 .15 12763 30.40 29.89 29.89—.30 29408 35.25 33.7634.22 + 2.72 1 34094 41.46 40.0041.46 + 1.27 1.201 20831 71.45 70.06 70.23—.32 .241 42184 29.83 28.7728.87—1.14 2.08f 37236 58.72 57.1757.46—1.25 .07 37769 30.80 29.06 29.48 1.96 44519 48.77 48.19 48.35—.01 15379 30.05 29.56 29.74—.07 1.24 21139 43.33 42.99 43.16—.05 26399 4.30 4.16 4.21—.13 ,62e 21209 21.92 21.16 21.46—.33 1.44 45802 61.17 59.3059.54—1.63 17066 27.04 26.0026.93+1.21 32637 22.31 21.83 22.15+ .02 .45 18179 54.26 52.2652.63—1.95 13618 16.54 16.39 16.44+ .05 .271 ,45534 29.45.29.13 29.297-.16. 1:50 '19181 3B.34'37:5B 37.66r-'.34' 1.48' 15232 41.b7'40.'35' MM—3?' 1.24 14354 29.09 28.73 28.97—.12 19679 21.72 21.14 21.27+ .07 119125 12.00 11.62 11.68-^.33 ' .2415151 62.80 59.7060.05-2.99 .16 18131 14.80 14.35 14.43-.31 16734 16.91 16.27 16.53—.13 .401 14493 48.01 46.5846.65—2.08 .10 20892 42.47 40.31 40.65—2.00 1.28 7971158.81 57.4257.61—1.19 .40 75960 6.85 6.72 6.80+ .11 FredMac II 1.88 1486858.2957.50 58.09+ .59 FMCG 1.258 22712 48.30 46.4846.98—1.32 GenElac 1 81582 33.95 33.72 33.90—.03 GnMotr 1 40398 26.55 25.80 26.42 + .82 Genworth .30 14572 33.75 33.22 33.50+ .71 Goldcrp g .18 35724 27.25 26.42 26.60—.78 GoldmanS 1.40 30813145.75143.37145.20+1.20 GTelevsa s .16e 1466417.9517.41 17.65—.12 Halllbln .60 34834 74.43 71.41 71.74—2.69 Heinz 1.401 19357 41.62 41.24 41.42 + .33 HewlattP .32 180313 34.00 33.06 33.88 + .84 HomeDp .60 36396 37.23 36.82 37.01 + .10 Honwlllnll .91 14125 39.50 38.70 38.76—.22 IShBrazil .586 18329 35.46 34.45 34.88—.27 iShJapan .06e 10017013.05 12.93 13.00+ .07 BoslonScI BrMySq CVS Cp CarMax Carnival Caterpillar ChesEng Chevron ClrcClty Citigrp Coach CocaCI Coeur CVRD s ConocPhll CtlAIr B Coming DevonE DirecTV Disney . , DowChhi DuP6nt • DukeEgy ETrade EMC Cp EOG Res ElPasoCp Elan EnCana ENSCO ExxonMbl FordM Sates High Low Last Chg IBM 1.201 21201 78.30 77.81 78.11+ .16 Interpublic 20609 8.75 8.67 8.69+ .12 JPMomCh 1.36 3698740.46 40.00 40.19+ .03 JotMVln 1.501 41171 61.68 61.42 61.48—.20 KB Home 1 14770 46.24 44.96 45.10—.37 KerrMcG s .13(1291351.4049.0549.45—1.88 Kohls 17045 58.40 57.68 57.95+ .45 LehmnBr S .48 14185 64.20 62.21 63.11—.24 Lucent 85977 2.48 2.40 2.41—.03 MEMO II 14623 35.80 34.13 34.80—.24 Maralhon 1.601 1457974.69 71.7872.21—2.34 MavTube 14113 62.99 62.78 62.97+ .23 McDnWs .671 14604 33.25 32.93 33.00—.14 Medtmic .39 13431 50.51 50.01 50.08—.17 Merck 1.52 32099 34.77 34.40 34.55+ .14 Merrillyn 1 20084 68.08 66.65 67.23—.02 Michaels .40 13916 37.33 36.89 36.99—.94 MtcronT 38063 16.48 15.99 16.10—.25 Mlrant n 20070 25.56 24.94 25.36 + .20 MorgSlan 1.08 13257 57.46 56.37 56.91—.08 Motorola .201 43443 20.20 19.91 20.10+ .02 Nabors s 25552 32.44 31.50 31.69—.74 NatSeml .12 14116 24.70 24.20 24.42+ .07 NewmtM .40 35453 50.24 49.39 49.62—44 NewsCpA .176 20800 19.00 18.85 18.90+ .01 NobleCorp .16 1597569.2566.9467.40—1.71 NokiaCp .466 57698 20.68 20.16 20.23+ .26 NorteINt H 174449 2.29 2.11 2.12—.15 Nucor S .40826200 51.56 48.7549.15—1.40 OcclPet 1.44 16744 96.98 92.91 93.50—3.23 PeabdyE s .242216752.4549.7850.26—2.12 PepsiCo 1.201 16797 60.08 59.56 59.64—.06 Petrobrs 3e 16631 79.06 76.3277.59—1.48 Pfizer .96 93887 23.60 23.17 23.36—.07 PhelpsD s .752845279.9577.6078.21—1.89 PioNW .24 2058843.5142.0042.32—1.99 ProctGam 1.241 4147456.0055.44 55.57+ .55 PulteH s .16 13046 28.34 27.63 27.80—.16 QwestCm 54262 7.74 7.65 7.67 SaraLee .79 15290 17.20 17.02 17.06—.06 Schlmb s .50 38639 58.11 55.9356.34—1.91 SeagateT .32 19725 22.15 21.45 21.90 + .12 Shurgard 2.24 13112 60.72 59.88 60.61+ .73 Sotectm 25669 3.35 3.27 3.34+ .05 SovrgnBcp .321 1361421.00 20.60 20.64—.14 SprintNex .10 58264 20.63 20.17 20.22—.37 StarwdHU n 1348358.8656.9258.43 + 1.86 ST Gold. 27329 57,25 .56.62, SaiJlTTjp, Sunctf g" li .&f 14731 72.19 69.4869.65-^3.17' Symmetry •' '17959 [ r7.75' l 15.34'18:17^-2.B6 l TXU Cp s 1.65 13742 58.45 57.26 57.68—.67 TalwSemi .39r 20451 9.19 9.02 9.06—.03 Target"" 1 ' '.W13068 *9:85"»S.20"«0.27*06''' TexinBt .12 63507 30.38 29.63 30.31 + .75 TimeWam .20 93286 17.13 16.93 17.12+ .16 TitanMt S 55398 33.35 30.55 31.54—.98 Transocn 26650 76.03 73.81 74.23—2.04 Tycolnll .40 22876 27.15 26.86 26.99+ .12 US Bancrp 1.321441531.53 31.28 31.48 + .20 USSteel ,60f 22380 63.30 61.17 61.98—.96 Utdhllh .031 21039 44.50 43.87 43.90—.39 Unlvlsion 16073 35.78 35.20 35.47—.28 ValeroE s .32(4292659.7857.7358.00-2.00 VerizonCm 1.62 42432 32.82 32.49 32.79 + .25 Vlshay 15252 14.80 14.46 14.79+ .21 Vonage n 15875 9.30 8.56 8.72—.88 Wachovia 2.04 17958 53.00 52.70 52.81 +.05 WalMart .671 46190 48.90 48.26 48.54 + .23 Wakjm .26 16234 43.44 42.95 43.22+ .02 Weathllnt s 18411 48.4846.8747.62—1.16 WellsFrgo 2.08 1622467.10 66.65 66.93+ .28 Weyerh 2.401 14456 59.86 58.98 59.43+.38 WmsCos .361 17260 21.67 20.90 20.96—.73 Wyeltl 11 19099 44.20 43.73 44.03—.06 XTO Engy.SOb 1859040.05 38.5438.78—1.24 CONTINUED FROM PAGE A1 But the judge noted the probable-cause affidavit contained additional information. Fleming said Tillman spoke to police about weapons and authorities found a rifle,.revolver, shotgun, ammunition, six swords and 40 knives at the boy's house. He said police also found a note suggesting Tillman might have planned to commit suicide. "I don't want to draw too many conclusions from the affidavit, but it does give me a basis — would give anyone a basis — for concluding that Mr. Tillman was the ringleader, was the one who was organizing these discussions," Fleming said. In his testimony, Berry said New had said it was Tillman who told him April 20 was the anniversary of Adolf Hitler's birth and the anniversary of the Columbine High School massacre in Colorado. White testified that Tillman told them he had done a school report on the Columbine shootings during the previous academic year and had mentioned the anniversary during a lunch conversation in January or early February with New and the others. Berry said he and White also interviewed Byrd, Jaeger and another student who was not arrested. They did not question Hunt. Berry said neither he nor White questioned the students about a possible plot. "I mean, we were given the impression by the initial individual, Mr. Coy New, that it was a conversation at lunch," Berry said. "He did not indicate to us that there was any plan. So at that time we had no information that there was an alleged plan." Berry said New's punishment was to have his Internet access at school revoked for the rest of the school year and that New and the others were allowed to return to their classes. The following day, April 19, rumors were circulating at the school. Student Michaela Ferneau said she was told by one student that she was involved in the plot and by another that she was a target. Ferneau said she sent an instant message to a friend in North Carolina, who she said urged her to contact authorities, but the friend apparently contacted authorities herself. Midday markets LOCAL INTEREST Courteiy Darr.ll Q. MM, Edward Jorm Pric* Crwnga AlltellCorp 61.39 -.56 Anheuser Busch 45.45 -.07 AT&T 28.00 + .21 Atmos Energ Common ...26.41 -.24 BankAmerlca Corp ...47.47 + .05 Baxter 38.04 +.04 BP 65.44 -1.26 Caremark Rx 47.23 -.16 Commerce Banes 50.98 + .01 ConAgra 22.26 +.14 Deere & Co 79.93 -.88 Out & Phelp 10.17 + .01 Duke Energy 28.964 -.13 El Paso Corp 14.39 -.35 Halliburton 71.79 -2.64 Kinder Morgan „ 99.50 -.49 KellwoodCo 28.09 -.18 Noon quoin Prlc« China. Kroger 19.68 + .07 McDonald's 33.00 -.14 Microsoft 22.40 +.30 Molson Coors 67.33 -.25 Northwest Nat. Gas 34.77 -.23 Raytheon Co 44.26 -.32 Semco Energy Inc 5.80 + .03 Southwest Gas Corp 28.96 -.24 Sprint Nextel 20.22 -.37 SyskO Corp 30.22 -.22 Sykes Enterprises 15.59 -.30 Lowes Co 62.26 + .02 Home Depot Inc 36.99 + .08 Liz Clalbome 37.32 -.17 Union Pacific 88.59 -1.17 WalMart 48.57 +.28 Wester Energy 21.60 -.14 RANDOM: Mother's age constantly fooling others LIVESTOCK CONTINUED FROM PAGE A1 Bolinger still drove her own car until falling earlier this month and breaking her pelvis. Her temporary home-away-from-home now is in the rehabilitation center at Hays Medical Center, where she said she is receiving "wonderful care." "I'm making progress," she said Thursday night. "I don't mind being here. I just wish I could get around some." "If you could get around, you wouldn't be here," Gaston gently reminded her mom. Gaston gets a kick out of how people look twice when they hear her mother's age, one as recently as when her mother entered the hospital after her fall. "One of the nurses pulled me aside and said, 'I want to verify your mother's birthday,' " Gaston said. " 'It says here,' the nurse said, 'that her birthday is Nov. 5,1911. That would make her 94 years old.'" The nurse looked skeptical, then shocked after Gaston told her that was correct. "That happens a lot," Bolinger said with a smile. "I don't know why. I don't know how I'm supposed to look, and I don't know how I'm supposed to act. I've never been this age before." Heredity is on Bolinger's side for celebrating several more birthdays. Her mother lived to be 99, and one of her brothers was 93. Bolinger credits a positive outlook on life and keeping busy to a long, happy life. "There is always someone worse off than you," she said. Bolinger also keeps busy with all types of needlework, including knitting, crocheting and tatting and typing family history — and visiting children and grandchildren with her favorite travel partner. "I feel like I benefit from her," Bolinger said. "I don't know what I'd do without her." "Actually," Gaston said, "we take care of each other." Reporter Diane Gasper-O'Brien can be reached at (785) 628-1081, ext. 126, or by e-mail at dobrlon&dallynowo.not. BBQ: Group plans to continue cooking to hone skills, stomachs CONTINUED FROM PAGE A1 "There's contests around here, but just not on the right weekend, and not close enough," he said. A panel of judges decided the winners of most of the categories, but one round was a tasters' choice contest, Spectators sampled each team's pulled pork and voted for their fa- vorite. Mike Rader, a conservation worker at Wilson State Park and an event organizer, said about 300 people partook in this event. "We weren't sure exactly what to expect as far as our tasters' choice, and we were sort of overwhelmed by that," Rader said. "We were having to turn people away. The cooks were having to give people some of the leftovers from (other categories), and everybody still ran out." Organizers already expect next year's competition to be bigger than this one. Rader said a second-year contest must have 25 participants to gain sanctioning by the Kansas City Barbeque Society. Until then, Dirty Dave's Smokin 1 Crew and the other barbecue aficionados will continue cooking. They do it because they like to cook, and because they like to eat. Norton said their cooking is better than any food on the market. "We all like to eat better than you can buy," he said. Reporter Will Manly can be reached at (785) 628-1081, ext. 138, or by e-mail at wmanly&dallynewi.nit. CourtMy DACO Inc. Est Cattle Slaughter 126,000 Choice 3-beef (cut-out) $151.51 Western Ks Cattle $80.60 Peoria Hogs $65.00 CHICAGO MERCANTILE Courteiy DACO Inc. Pr»v High Prav Low canta |»r pound Prtv CIOM Noon Quota Live Beef Cattle June August October December 81.80 83.50 86.40 88.00 80.40 82.30 85.50 86.60 61.65 83.45 86.05 87.85 82.20 83.97 86.82 68.15 Feeder Cattle August September October November Hog* July August October December 112.67 111.97 111.00 110.00 76.10 73.05 62.10 58.50 111.75 111.15 110.00 109.00 74.80 71.90 61.35 67.30 112.67 111.97 110.60 109.80 75.47 72.32 61.82 58.37 113,15 112.45 111.35 110.25 76.65 73.60 63.10 58.65 Pork belllea July August February OIL 96.50 92.50 86.00 94.30 90.60 85.06 CvurtMy DMO Inc. 95.65 91.05 66.05 98.65 94.05 65.05 votwv ptc own) Kansas Crude, noon quote $61.50 NY Spot Crude, noon quote ....$66.90 -$.88 LIVESTOCK NATIONAL BOXED BEEF CUTOUT This report Is based on Information provided by companies that agreed to continue to participate In Livestock Mandatory Reporting on a voluntary basis. Boxed beef generally steady on light to moderate demand and offering*. Select and Choice rib, chuck, round and loin cut* generally steady. 0e«t trimming* generally (teady on moderate demand and offerings. Estimated composite cutout value of Choice 1-3 600-900 (M carcaMM dn .14 at 151.81: Select 1-3 600-900 IPS carcaues up .25 at 121.09; based on 120.96 load* of Choice cut*. HAYS CASH GRAINS CourtMy HMKnd MwfcMlna dollim Local cash wheat 4.25 Local cash mllo 3.37 KANSAS CITY WHEAT CourtMy DACO Inc. ddlwi pir btnrnl Prav Prav Prav Noon High Low CIOM Quota July 4.67 4.59 4.62 Vi 4.62 V* September 4.75 4.69 4.72 472V4 December 4.85 4.79 4.82 W 4.83 Vi CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE CourtMy DACO Inc. Prav High Wheat July 3.63V* September 3.80 December 3.98 Com July 2.36V* September 2.48% December 2.62V* Soybean* July 6.01 August 6.07 November 6.27V* Soybean meal Jury 161.30 August 182.30 October 184.20 0*1* July 2.01 September 1.87 December 1.98 Prav Prav Noon Low CIOM Quota doltaraptrtnurnl 3.58 3.59 3.61 3.74V4 3.76V4 3.78% 3.92V4 3.83V* 3.96 dollara ptr bushel 2.33 V< 2.35V* 2.31 V* 2.45% 2.47 2.43 2.59 '/» 2.61 '/« 2.67% dolUM ptr bu»h»l 5.93V4 6.00% 6.84 6.00 6.06V* 6.80V* 6.20V* 6.27 6.10K (tolltrepwton 178.30 180.80 177.60 160.30 181.90 178.60 182.60 183.80 180.40 *Mn PW buihtl 1.92% 1.96V* 1.95 1.81 1.84 1.92V* 1.83 1.85V* 1.85 METALS price od ~ SP01 nonl " rou8 m9tal Copper- 345.65 cents Cathode full plate, ' U.8. dMtlnatlon*. »•"«•• ^ Copper 338.65 cent* per Ib., N.Y. Mere spot lead • $924.60 per metric ton, London Metal cxoh. Zinc • 161.61 cents Ib., delivered • $571.00 Handy & Harm*, (only dally '

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