The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas on March 29, 1998 · Page 57
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The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas · Page 57

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Salina, Kansas
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Sunday, March 29, 1998
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Page 57
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Straight Talk By Jeffrey Zaslow ADVICE Rekindle old dreams: Check in with old friends or lovers, Burns says. "Hooking up with anybody from your past gets you thinking about things you haven't thought about in a while. It can rekindle dreams." Defy a small-town fate: "Small towns can dictate your fate. But sometimes all you need is to take a tiny step, make a change, and you can escape your fate." "(sufferfrom Irish- Catholic guilt. Guilt is a good reality check. It keeps that'do what thing in check." There are good roles for women: Burns says "a lot of'name' actresses passed" on a role in his new movie. "I think they passed for financial reasons. You hear them complain there aren't good parts for women, [What they mean is] there aren't good parts that pay well." ASH UUHNS I OH ADVICl Burns will write or call one reader who seeks advice. Write by April 5 to "Straight Talk," RO. Box 3455, Chicago, III. 60654 (fax: 312-661-0375; e-mail: talk@usaweekend.com). Zaslow Is an advice columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times Co. CO WCllll Dill flSi The son of a cop is now a top filmmaker. He relishes his working-class roots, but says to scope out escape routes: "The only way you'll know if there's more is if you take that first step." C ULTURE SHOCK. That's what filmmaker Edward Burns experienced when he became Hollywood's "It Boy" in 1995. A native of New York's Long Island, he'd written, directed and starred in The Brothers McMullen, a romantic comedy filmed in his mother's house for $25,000. The movie grossed $10 million, and Burns, the son of a cop, soon was jetting west to meet movie moguls. "I'd get totally lonely out here," he says, so on weekends he'd walk around tony Los Angeles neighborhoods. "It's strange. The weather is beautiful, but there's not a kid on a bike. Nobody's playing football on a front lawn. No one is gardening. Where are they all? The kids are inside playing Nintendo, and all the parents are inside writing screenplays." And yet, in this surreal town, Burns, 30, is getting to make movies about very real people. No Looking Back, his third movie, is a piercing exploration of his blue-collar roots. Set in a fading seashore town, the film also stars Lauren Holly and Jon Bon Jovi. Appropriately, working-class troubadour Bruce Springsteen lent three songs for the soundtrack. Burns, who strives for authenticity, is miffed that an early review found Holly's character too pretty to be stuck as an unfulfilled waitress. Burns calls such a view elitist and ignorant. "On her next trip from Manhattan to the Hamptons," he snaps, this reviewer should get off at a "working-class" exit. "In my hometown [Valley Stream], there are two beautiful girls, total knockouts. They're checkout clerks at the supermarket. Not all homecoming queens turn into models and actresses." Burns says millions of young adults "are stuck in small towns and don't have a concrete dream. They don't know what they want. They just know they want more." His advice: "Get out. The only way you'll know if there's anything more is if you take that first step." He has related advice for the families inside those Hollywood homes: "Come out and play." d This wwk: Burns has a new movie, No Looking Back, and a new book of his screenplays. Up next, he'll star with Tom Hanks in Steven Spielberg's Saving Private Ryan. j PRESIDENT, CEO * EPITOR: Mtrcl* BtKUrd t PUBLISHER: Ch«r|« q*M*l«n t VICE WESIQEmS: P»v* Par^tr, Bill C«iWn,Ctr»J K»rn»r-Odgll,B*th Uwi»no»,Thowa» M»lul OdOmCB Executive EclttWi Amy Elsman Swtof Editor: Pan Olmsted SjnteAMOdftte Elian Brenda Turner AModate EdttW Gayla Jo Carter, Carol Cluiroan, Patricia Edmonds, Constance Kurz, loirie lynch, Kathleen McCleary Copy Chtef: Tom Lent Copy Edtton Terry Byrne Mto A Wtfwtnw P»y Edftor: Pamela Brown Stiff Wrtten Dennis MoCafferty B8W*r«hw: C6sar 6, Soriano EdttartilA««Wlint»: Michele Hatty. Miranda Walter IH'l.'lll|lllf)llil«I!gl3!H Fred Barnes, Ken Bums, Jean Carper, Jean Sherman Chattky, Roger Cossack, Stephen Covey, George Foreman, Monlka Guttman, Mia Hamm, Stephanie Mansfield, Tom McNIchol, Jill Nelson, Cokle Roberts, Steve Roberts, Tabltha Soren, Greta Van Susteren, Jeffrey Zaslow CGH Art Wrwtor: Pamela Smitn iHMMt Art Pkwteri: Clay Auch, Nathaniel Uvine Photo PMfc Molly Roberts, Cindy Sorgen-El^er TwhnotegyldanilwnievaSwse 0(H»HiM««! Kate Bond TOIBBI Director N«w Media: Dierck Caspian Edltortal:Vin Narayanan, Amelia Stephenson, Casey Shaw AdwrWng: Doug Knepper latnilllllli'lrlUmilil 535 Madison Ave., New York, N.v. 10022 IIUII'II jfillUJBBIl 1000 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, Va. 22229 HPECHI l-«XM87-afl« nw magmnt Am*n«i« rMwmrai* to * USA iWtFKEND USA WEEKEND • March 27-29,1988 10

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