The Hays Daily News from Hays, Kansas on June 12, 2006 · Page 6
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

The Hays Daily News from Hays, Kansas · Page 6

Publication:
Location:
Hays, Kansas
Issue Date:
Monday, June 12, 2006
Page:
Page 6
Start Free Trial
Cancel

A6 THE HAYS DAILY NEWS FOR THE RECORD MONDAY, JUNE 12,2006 Obituaries Clayton E. Brown Clayton E. Brown, 21, WaKeeney, died Saturday, June 10, 2006, at Via Christl Regional Medical Center- St. Francis, Wichita. He was born April 19,1985, in Hays to Richard Jr. and Rulene (Balluch) Brown. He was a 2004 graduate of Trego Community High School. He was a farmer and rancher. Survivors include his parents, Rulene Brown and Louis Rosproy, WaKeeney, and Richard Brown, Walker; two brothers, Jack R. Brown and Gerald W Brown, both of Russell; a sister, Audrey J. Dominguez, Amarillo, Texas; and grandmother Bertha Brown, Walker. He was preceded in death by grandfather Richard Brown and grandparents Rudy and Helen Balluch. Services will be at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday at Christ the King Catholic Church, WaKeeney; burial in Christ the King Catholic Cemetery, WaKeeney. Visitation will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday at Schmitt Funeral Home, 336 North 12th, WaKeeney, KS 67672, with a vigil service at 7 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorials are suggested to Trego school systems in care of funeral home. Nona Darlene Stanley Nona Darlene Stanley, 81, Oberlin, died Saturday, June 10, 2006, in Oberlin. Arrangements are pending with Pauls Funeral Home, Oberlin. Harold Wayne Lentz Harold Wayne Lentz, 78, Grayville, 111., died Saturday, June 10,2006, at his home. He was born March 29,1928, in Terre Haute, Ind., to Russell R. and Thelma (Elliott) Lentz. He married Katherine Mayanne Allen on Jan. 24,1947, in Phillipsburg. He owned an oilfield welding and construction business for several years. Survivors include his wife, of the home, three sons, Allen Lentz, 29 Palms, Calif., Tom Lentz, Farmington, N.M., Wayne Lentz, Morgantown, W Va.; a daughter, Linda Morgan, Huntsville, Ala.; a brother, Russell Lentz, Highland, 111.; two sisters, Mary Kurts, Pahrump, Nev., and Rosemary Freeman, Fairfield, III; five grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Services will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Cook Funeral Chapel, Grayville; burial in Stockton Cemetery. Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. today at the funeral home, and at 1 p.m. Thursday at Smith- Moore-Overlease Funeral Home, Stockton. Memorials are suggested to TIP Hospice, Mount Carmel or First Christian Church, Grayville, in care of Cook Funeral Chapel. Edna A. Kern Edna A. Kern, 95, Plainville, died Sunday, June 11, 2006, at Rooks County Nursing Home. Arrangements are pending with Moore-Overlease Funeral Chapel, Plainville. Christine Frances Schruben Christine Frances Schruben, 78, North Bethesda, Md., died June 9, 2006, at Suburban Hospital, Bethesda. She was born Feb. 6,1928, in Reading, to Maurice F. and ADDITIONAL SERVICES Stocks Stocks wander on inflation fears Tresa M. Bohall, 79, Monument, died Friday, June 9, 2006, at her home. Services will be 10a.m. Tuesday at Kennedy-Koster Funeral Home, Oakley; burial in Monument Township Cemetery, Monument. Visitation is until 9 p.m. today at the funeral home. Robert Duane "Bob" Wallgren, 70, Hays, died Saturday, June 10, 2006, at Via Christ) Regional Medical Center-St. Francis Campus, Wichita. Services will be at 11 a.m. Tuesday at Celebration Community Church. Visitation will be from 5 to 7 p.m. today at Hays Memorial Chapel Funeral Home, and from 10:30 a.m. until time of service Tuesday at the church. Ralph A. Northup, 81, Stockton, died Saturday, June 10, 2006, at Solomon Valley Manor, Stockton. Services will be at 10:30 Louise E. (DeBauge) Copt. She attended Kansas State University and the University of Maryland. She married John Schruben in 1948. She was a homemaker. Survivors include her husband, of the home; six sons, Phillip Schruben, Moore, Okla., Paul Schruben, Derwood, Md., Jeffrey Schruben, Rockville, Md., Mark Schruben, Austin, Texas, Tom Schruben, Kensington, Md., and Peter Schruben, Lockport, N.Y.; two daughters, Mary Schruben, Santa Fe, N.M., and Emily Trust, Savannah, Ga.; and seven grandchildren. a.m Tuesday at Smtth4/lbofe- Overlease Funeral Home, 723 N. First, Stockton, KS 67669; burial in Stockton Cemetery. Visitation will be until 8 p.m. today, and from 9 to 10 a.m. Tuesday, all at the funeral home. Carol Ailene Strickland, 67, Norton, died Thursday, June 8, 2006, at Russell Regional Medical Center. Services will be at 10 a.m. Wednesday at Enfield Funeral Home, 215 W. Main, Norton; burial in Norton Cemetery. OBITMRYPOUCY The Hays Dally News will publish a basic, standard obituary free of charge for people with direct ties to the newspaper's circulation area. If survivors desire to add information to an obituary, they may do so for an additional charge. Completely custom obituaries are handled as paid advertising. For more Information, call (785) 628-1081. She was preceded in death by a grandson, Tucker, in 2002. Services will be at 11:00 a.m. Saturday at St. Thomas Cemetery, Stockton; burial in St. Thomas Cemetery. Visitation will be from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Saturday at Smith- Moore-Overlease Funeral Home, 723 N. First, Stockton, KS 67669. Memorials are suggested to to Multiple Sclerosis Foundation in care of funeral home. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.mooreover lease.com. NUSS: No notes from meetings produced CONTINUED FROM PAGE A3 But if Barnett doesn't have any doubts, he and others concerned about the Nuss case don't have much more than speculation and inferences. Morris has insisted the March 1 lunch with Nuss was" his only'contact With thlTcourt. The only evidence tcTco'ntra'dict that is Barnett's statement that Morris told him sometime in February, before the Nuss' lunch, that Morris and the governor's office knew of "backdoor" communication with the court. Morris said he and Barnett didn't have such a conver- sation in February. Morris apparently said plenty to other senators in late March, after the Senate rejected three school finance plans, including one drafted by Barnett as part of his campaign for the GOP gubernatorial nomination, on a 20-20 'vote. '"• Barnett aYid Sens,Pat Apple, •' R'-Loul'sburg; ferry Bruce, R- Hutchinson, and Susan Wagle, R- Wichita, Barnett's running mate, testified that Morris told them ' that he'd talked to an employee of the court, who assured Morris that the justices could be persuaded to accept a plan under the right conditions. Morris says that's not true. Of course, no notes from any of those meetings have been produced. Nor, apparently, were tapes or videos made. It's also worth noting that tension existed between Barnett, other GOP senators and Morris. The Senate president could- have changed his vot&'tit l others to do so, to help a fellow" Republican's ambition to unseat Sebelius, a Democrat, or simply to move a school finance bill closer to passage. Might Morris, confronted by fellow GOP senators, exaggerate his contact with the court in defending his vote against Bar- Stores pushing Father's Day By ANNE D'INNOCENZIO ASSOCIATED PRKSS NEW YORK — This year, dads are battling it out with moms for their loved ones' wallet. The nation's major retailers are turning their attention to Father's Day, which has long lagged behind Mother's Day among the most important holiday sales periods. By expanding shopping hours and advertising earlier and more aggressively for Father's Day — which this year falls on June 18 — merchants are hoping to provide a big sales boost during summer's lull. Sears Holdings Corp.'s Sears, Roebuck and Co. stores declared June the season for dads, elevating it to a "Christmas-like status," according to Corinne Gudovic, a company spokeswoman. The retailer recently dispatched caroling dads who sing holiday jingles with Father's Day themes — "O 1 Plasma Screen" — at malls in the New York and Chicago area. It broke its Father's Day ad campaign on June 4, three weeks earlier than a year ago and is offering a Father's Day gift card for the first time. Meanwhile, Home Depot Inc., the nation's largest home improvement merchant, expanded its Father's Day advertising beyond circular ads this year, launching a TV and online advertising campaign. It's also pushing a wider array of gifts beyond the tool kit to include grills and pressure washers. "This year, Father's Day is very important and very opportunistic," said Marshal Cohen, chief analyst at NPD Group Inc., a market research firm based in Port Washington, N.Y. "But with that comes greater risk. You have to spend more to market and you have to risk more with greater inventory." But retailers are willing to take such risks, worried that higher gas prices and inflation will keep shoppers away this summer and reverse a solid trend in consumer spending this JOHN BAZEMORE / Associated Press The Black and Decker Alligator Lopper shown Thursday at a Home Depot store in Atlanta Is one of the Items the home Improvement giant hopes will be bought as Father's Day gifts. year. Merchants see Father's Day as the last big sales opportunity before the back-to-school season kicks off in August. According to the National Retail Federation's survey of 7,000 consumers, shoppers plan to spend $9 billion on Father's Day gifts, up from a planned $8.2 billion a year ago. Still, that lags behind Mother's Day, with sales expected to reach $13.8 billion this year, up from $11.4 billion, based on a consumer survey. Mother's Day is the third biggest holiday sales generator, behind the winter holiday and back-to- school seasons; Father's Day is sixth, with Valentine's Day and Easter ranked as fourth and fifth, respectively. According to NRF, the average person plans to spend $88.80 on dads, compared with $122.16 for moms. Mike Boylson, chief marketing officer at J.C. Penney Co. Inc., estimated that Father's Day spending accounts for two-thirds of Mother's Day sales. Penney is opening its doors at 8 a.m. on June 17, an hour earlier than a year ago. It is hoping to bring customers in with an increased assortment of gifts beyond ties and shirts to include iPod accessories and handheld games. Cohen noted Father's Day has lagged behind Mother's Day because buying for dads is a lot harder than buying for mothers. Men usually go out to the store and get what they want. Women traditionally buy what they want too, but they also like to wait around thinking about a gift someone can get them. Furthermore, stores have traditionally done a better job packaging Mother's Day gifts, but that's changing this year, according to Leigh Zarelli, vice president of merchandising at Gifts.com, which offers free advice on the best gifts online and has 200 retail partners. She noted merchants like Mrsfields.com and The Orvis Co. Inc. are offering more attractive Father's Day gifts this year. Gifts.com began promoting Father's Day the day after Mother's Day this year, five weeks earlier than last year. Some merchants are already noticing their stepped-up efforts are paying off, reporting increased sales over a year ago. nett's plan? Might Barnett and the others read more into Morris' statements than he meant to convey? "There was a lot of frustration; there was a lot of emotion; there was a lot of conversation going on," Ward said. "In those ' •• situations, it's not unusual for * 1M pfW«J*mtei 8 and pick those "' things out-' because they're upset." The first testimony before the House committee last week only piled up a raft of conflicting statements and suppositions, suggesting the committee's investigation could end with a whimper. Pony Express riders head east HASTINGS, Neb. (AP) — Pounding their way east are thrilling reminders of yesteryear — the riders of the Pony Express. Since 1980, the 1,966-mile ride from Sacramento, Calif., to St. Joseph, Mo., is staged each June by the National Pony Express Association. The association, which was formed in 1978, is based in Pollock Pines, Calif,, and boasts nearly 800 members. Lyle Gronewold of Gothenburg is president of the Nebraska branch, which reports 240 members. The ride began Tuesday and is scheduled to end Friday, passing through California, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska and Kansas on the way to St. Joseph. The 550 participants are re-enacting the efforts of the men who worked for a freighting firm owned by William Russell, Alexander Majors and William Waddell. Their company: the Central Overland California and Pikes Peak Express Co. From April 3,1860, through October 1861, the company riders shuttled mail between the Missouri River and the Pacific Coast. It employed 40 riders in each direction, 190 stations and 400 sta- tionkeepers to keep the Pony Express running. Around 400 horses stocked the Pony Express route. Thoroughbreds, mustangs, pintos and Morgans were often used. Riders were paid $25 per week, riding 10-12 miles between changing horses and 75 miles before being relieved. Atop the rider's saddle today and 145 years ago is a "mochila" — a type of leather blanket with pouches for mail. The word "mochila" came from the Spanish word for knapsack. The Pony Express riders never used the mail pouch so prominent in Hollywood depictions. Historians say the flow of mail influenced California's remaining in the Union — a political success. NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street meandered in nervous trading today as inflation fears kept investors on edge following hefty losses last week, the worst so far in 2006. Investors have been reluctant to buy stocks ever since the Federal Reserve said in early May that record oil prices could require higher interest rates to keep prices from climbing elsewhere. Downbeat inflation comments from Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland President Sandra Pianalto today was another reminder for an already uneasy market. But recent signs of slowing economic growth now has Wall Street worried that more rate hikes could send the economy sliding. Trading was expected to be skittish this week ahead of wholesale and consumer price data, which might bring clues about whether the Fed will boost rates again at its June 28-29 meeting. "There are certainly some positives in the economy to point to, but until we get some more clarity on the battle between inflation and economic growth, the markets are likely to remain volatile," said Michael Sheldon, chief market strategist at Spencer Clarke LLC. The interest rate concerns overshadowed strong earnings from investment bank Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. and news that General Motors Corp. struck a buyout deal with its union and former parts supplier Delphi Corp. In early afternoon trading, the Dow gained 8.96, or 0.08 percent, to 10,900.88. The blue-chip index shed 355 points last week to stand about 6.5 percent below its six-year high of 11,642.98, reached May 10. Broader stock indicators retreated. The Standard & Poor's 500 index was down 2.89, or 0.23 percent, at 1(249.41, and the Nas- daq composite index lost 15.98. NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE Most active stocks at noon (11 a.m. Central time) Sales High Low Last Chg AT&T. Ino 1.33 56646 27.04 26.65 27.02+ .40 AMD 75268 26.97 25.81 26.18—.57 Aelna s .021 22525 42.15 40.85 40.98—.67 Agilent 12923 33.84 32.86 33.02—.71 Alcan .60 14667 46.25 44.70 44.95—.93 Alcoa .60 18766 30.62 30.04 30.34+ .16 AllegTch .40 21428 62.42 60.00 60.63—.60 Allrla 3.20 28663 72.00 71.39 71.98+ .91 AMovilL s .84e 3586830.65 29.21 29.75—.51 AmExp .60) '13499 53.65 53.22 53.58+ .12 AmlntGp II .661 1944060.4759.90 60.42+.21 Anadark s .36 X15075 48.47 47.12 47.35—.14 Apache .40 16169 62.45 60.50 60.58—.65 ArchC S .241718442.1040.1940.52—1.40 ArchDan .40 19302 42.15 41.20 41.65 + .39 BHP BIIILI ,64e 1299639.9838.90 39.18—.22 BJ Svcs s .20 20945 36.42 34.75 35.53—.55 BP PLC 2.20e 14578 67.78 66.98 67.17—.31 BakrHu .52 16951 82.12 78.8879.32—2.30 BkofAm 2 40597 49.01 48.55 48.95+ .16 BkNY .84 14127 32.50 31.86 31.93—.47 BarrickG .22 14926 28.50 27.72 27.94—.15 BellSouth 1.16 17242 35.13 34.60 35.07+ .49 BestBuy s .32 16343 50.80 49.45 49.85—.54 Boeing 1.20 18269 80.75 78.51 79.04—1.46 BostonScI 19522 19.79 19.55 19.59—.1£ BrMySq 1.12 16467 25.10 24.78 24.87—.08 CA Inc .16 14164 21.78 21.39 21.41—.36 CBS B n .72116927 26.40 25.92 26.15+ .40 CVS Cp .15 17061 29.39 29.20 29.30+ .09 Carnival 1 25168 37.35 36.64 36.73—.54 Catarpil s 1 25156 68.40 66.94 67.26—.26 Cendanl .11] 23532 16.13 15.96 16.06 Centex .16 13540 47.19 46.36 46.94—.19 ChesEng .20 33644 29.34 28.45 28.50—.39 Chevron 2.081 48283 58.41 57.64 58.11+ .58 Citigrp 1.96 53253 49.95.49.50 49.90+ .13 CocaCI 1.24 20477 43.68 43.41 43.65 + .10 Coeur 34663 4.63 4.46 4.51—.06 ColgPal 1.281 16307 62.32 61.50 62.07+ .56 CVRD s .62636944 21.75 21.00 21.38—.34 CVRO pf s .626 15745 17.70 17.29 17.54—.32 ConocPhil 1.44 31676 61.30 59.86 60.27—.30 ConsolE s .281312539.4637.7538.01—1.25 CtlAIr B 16828 25.39 24.74 25.00—.03 Coming 100841 22.30 20.8020.90—1.37 CntwdFn .60 16358 37.06 36.26 36.98+.04 DR Morton .40 23023 23.98 23.48 23.82—.05 •DevonE .45 23384 53.80 52.53 52.78-^.31 V" i Disney .271 96416,28.74-28.30-ZS.&a-aB'l if .DollarG .20 14444 14.99 14.73.14.82-^,13...' ETrade 22417 23.01 22.29 22.40—.36 ' EMC ,Cp 70084 11.96 11.85 11.88 + .06 EOG Res .24 16135 60.60 58.60 58.85—.90 ElPasoCp .16 13059 14.72 14.41 14.51—.06 Elan 37792 16.06 15.54 15.90—.07 ENSCO .10 13566 46.44 45.12 45.18—.91 Exelon 1.60 18169 58.50 57.98 58.49+ .67 ExxonMbl 1.28 7098559.35 58.63 58.76—.04 FannieM II 1.04 1654249.3948.13 48.27—.99 FedrDS s .511 X17181 35.73 34.37 34.72—.60 FordM .40 73985 6.96 6.84 6.96+ .20 FredMac If 1.882173357.6257.11 57.36—.20 FMCG 1.25a 24851 49.85 48.15 48.58—.45 Gateway 13378 1.62 1.54 1.57—.01 Genentch 13179 80.25 78.36 79.71 +1.20 GenElec 1 64354 34.27 34.04 34.25+ .18 GnMotr 1 67927 26.35 25.72 26.25 + .90 Goldcrp g .18 40762 27.08 25.92 26.18—.26 GoldmanSI.4028139150.72 145.60 148.60—1.29 Hallibtn .60 31996 73.60 70.99 71.62—.99 HewlettP .32 X43003 30.08 29.69 29.87 + .01 HomeDp .60 44275 36.96 36.40 36.91—.04 Honwlllntl .91 16031 38.50 37.82 38.25+ .15 HoustEx 29993 59.81 57.0259.02 + 4.37 1.601 .671 .39 1.52 1 1.08 Sales High Low Last Chg IShBrazll ,58e 20177 35.35 34.37 34.86—.29 IShJapan .060 12921713.04 12.84 12,91+.06 IShREst 2.618 15883 70,90 70.05 70,23—.72 IShSPSrtll .466 18050 60.45 59.37 59.77—.67 IBM 1.201 19890 78.04 77.35 78.01 + .38 JPMorgCh 1.36 3777242.23 41.64 42.10 JohnJn 1.501 22024 61.65 61.35 61.60+ .22 Kohls 14960 55.19 54.31 55.18+ .72 L-3 Com .75 1435676.8974.1174.73—2.04 LehmnBr s .48 52307 65.99 62.28 62.99—2.62 UllyEli 1.60 13783 52.36 51.77 52.34+ .60 LowesCos ,20m 1363462.43 62.02 62.09—.14 Lucent 108999 2.46 2.42 2.43—.02 MEMC II- 13416 32.30 30.88 31.36—.41 1677374.43 73.03 73.29—.08 14133 33.62 33.15 33.39+.01 12896 51.07 50.70 50.90 + .02 21642 34.13 33.85 33.95+ .14 34997 71.55 68.8469.35—1.72 36128 15.71 15.33 15.39—.14 22190 25,33 24.70 24.84 + .39 20847 59.70 57.89 58.62—.57 101554 21,08 20.39 20.50—.09 47918 49.45 45.97 46.81 —4.04 26128 32.97 31.75 31.91—.90 .12 30063 24.60 23.61 23.68—.81 .40 29122 50.24 49.12 49.43+ .12 .17e 39029 18.90 18.74 18.78—.01 NobleCbrp .16 18290 67.65 65.1065.31—1.37 NoklaCp .46e 57016 20.07 19.65 19.80—.26 NorteINt If 69267 2.24 2.20 2.20—.01 Nucor s .40a 24071 50.25 47.56 48.57—.69 OcclPet 1.44 17511 98.49 96.19 96.50—.43 PPL Cp 81.10 19044 31.67 31.13 31.60 + .49 PeabdyE s .2431631 53.2050.6551.15—1.10 PepsiCo 1.201 13732 59.99 59.56 59.97+ .04 Petrobrs 3e 19001 78.75 76.32 78.00—.71 Pfizer .96 82227 23.65 23.52 23.63+ .10 PhelpsD S .75 31218 80.80 77.77 78.36—.65 ProclGam 1.24f 2268054.9254.16 54,83+ .38 77289 7.69 7.51 7,55—.12 22950 11.80 11.25 11.31—.46 28048 1.50 1,36 1.38—.12 13212 33.44 32,98 33.41 +.53 17346 19.42 19.23 19.28+ .06 .50 40237 59.75 57.4357.94—1.28 .32 13677 23.28 22.45 22.61—.50 17260 3.48 3.39 3.42—.04 Marathon McOnlds Medtmlc Merck MerrillLyn MicronT Mlrant n MorgStan Motorola .20f NRG Egy Nabors s NatSemi NewmtM NewsCpA .22 , „' 24124 60.84 mi 0 60.47 + .02 43908 23.92 2l!40"23.89 +J.32 OwestCm ReliantEn Revlon SUude SchergPI Schlmb s SeagateT Solectm •.SwnEngy^s.,'.-.. 1 14797 27.44 BprlntN<ui^«10!-'29983. Suritech n __ . _ . Supvalu .661 16134 29.50 29.20.29.47+104 TXU Cp s 1.65 15438 58.08 57.46 58.02+ .13 TalwSemi ,39r 45231 8.89 8.77 B.86 + .08 Target .40 21011 48.98 48.51 48.92+ .51 TexTnst .12 115140 29.84 29.00 29.32—.36 TimeWam .20 69167 17.40 17.26 17.38+ .02 TilanMI s 4650934.6832.5033.00—1.33 Todoo 1e 14269 39.87 37.42 37.50—1.87 Transocn 28076 76.47 74.4074.54—1.23 Tycolntl .40 18527 27.00 26.70 26.97+ .28 UldMicro .01 r 24559 3.10 3.06 3.07+ .01 US Bancrp 1.32 1291831.67 31.43 31.67 + .09 USSteel .601 27962 62.04 59.30 60.05—.61 UtdTech 1.061 15820 60.66 59.86 60.02—.03 Uldhlth .031 18408 46.15 45.75 45.85+ .08 ValeroE s .321 33020 60.00 58.13 58.52—.71 VerizonCm 1.62 2029931.7431.52 31.68 + .18 Wachovia 2.04 17203 54.75 54.00 54.17—.13 WalMart .671 25646 47.42 47.07 47.37+ .24 Weathflnt s 25252 49.51 46.0246.39—2.93 WellsFrgo 2.08 1441869.44 68,62 69.36+ .24 XTO Engy .30b 1891238.85 38,01 38.18—.23 ZaleCp 1330427.7524.5027.08 + 3.21 Midday markets LOCAL INTEREST Courtesy Darren 0. Selbtl, Edward Jon«i Price Change AlltellCorp 61.02 -.03 Anheuser Busch 45.40 +.19 AT&T 27.04 + .42 Almos Energ Common 26.85 -.07 BankAmertca Corp 48.81 +.02 Baxter 37.99 +.14 BP .., 67.03 -.45 Caremark Rx 48.98 -.39 Commerce Banks 51.22 -.14 ConAgra 22.25 +.12 Deere & Co 78.42 -1.40 Out & Phelp 10.29 + .03 Duke Energy 29.09 + .16 El Paso Corp 14.45 -.12 Halliburton 71.22 -1.39 Kinder Morgan 99.78 -.05 KellwoodCo 29.17 -.35 LIVESTOCK Courtesy DACO Inc. Est. Cattle Slaughter 124,000 Choice 3-beel (cut-out) $154.12 Western Ks Cattle $81.50 Peoria Hogs $49.00 CHICAGO MERCANTILE Courtesy DACO Inc. Prev High Prev Low cents per pound Prev Close Noon Quote Live Beef Cattle June August October December 79.80 80.45 84.10 86.00 78.80 78.80 82.40 84.20 78.52 78.85 82.50 84.35 77.90 78.55 82.35 84.30 Feeder Cattle August September October November Hogs June July August October 109.90 109.15 108.07 107.00 73.20 71.72 69.70 59.00 108.55 108.02 107.05 106.20 72.65 70.60 68.70 58.25 108.60 108.25 107.30 106.75 72.95 70.70 69.47 58.45 108.15 107.37 10635 105.70 73.50 71.05 69.16 58.76 Pork bellies July August February 89.90 86.90 64.12 66.25 82.60 64.12 87.10 83.20 84.12 87.60 83.35 84.12 OIL Courtesy Dsco Inc. dollars per barrel Kansas Crude, noon quote .... $63.25 NV Spot Crude, noon quote.... $70.76 -$.88 LIVESTOCK ST. JOSEPH, Mo. (AP) — Hog Market Open, Mid-Session, and Close. Estimated Receipts: 300 Compared to Thursday, barrow* and gilts sold steady. Packers wanting a tew hogs alter last weeks 1.9 million slaughter and bidding steady with last week's sharply higher trend. 46-50 percent lean 240-280 Ibs 63.bO-54.00. Sows: Under 600 Ibs sold 1.00 higher; over 600 Ibs traded 2.00 higher; 1-2 300-500 Ibs 30.00-31.00; 1-3 600-700 Ibs 33.00-36.00. Boars: Steady, 300-700 Ibs 12.00. Noon quotee Price Change Kroger 19.61 -.08 McDonald's 33.42 + .04 Microsoft 22.04 +.12 MolsonCoors 67.84 .-.12 Northwest Nat. Gas 35.44 + .08 Raytheon Co 43.65 -.08 Semco Energy Inc 5.72 + .10 Southwest Gas Corp 29.21 + .05 Sprint Nextel 21.20 +.04 Sysko Corp 30.57 + .01 Sykes Enterprises 15.81 -.48 Lowes Co 62.15 -.08 Home Depot Inc 37.11 -.14 Liz Claiborne 37.63 -.12 Union Pacific 86.83 + .37 WalMart 47.36 +.23 Westar Energy 21.92 + .24 HAYS CASH GRAINS Courtesy Midland Marketing dollars Local cash wheat 4.45 Local cash mllo 2.75 KANSAS CITY WHEAT Courtesy OACO Inc. dollars per bushel Prev Prev Prev Noon High Low Close Quote July 4.95V4 4.78 4.79 4.82% September 5.04 V4 4.86 4.87 4.9114 December 5.12 4.93 4.94% 5.00 CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE Courtesy OACO Inc. Prev High Wheat July 3.90V4 September 4.06 December 4.22 V4 Corn July 2.47 !4 September 2.59 December 2.73 16 Soybeans July 5.92 W August 5.99 November 6.20 Vi Soybean meal July 181.00 August 181.80 October 183.20 Outs July 1.88 September 1.89% December 1,8914 Prav Prav Noon Low CtOM Quote dollars per bushel 3.71 3.7214 3.77/4 3.88 3.89 3.93 4.05 4.05Vi 4.09V4 dollsrs per bushel 2.40 V> 2.42 2.49 Vi 2.52 2.53% 2.61 2.66'/< 2.67% 2.75% dollars peibuttul 5.83 W 5.85 % 6.02 5.90 Vi 5.92 % 6.09 6.11W 6.1614 6.30'/S dollars per ton 176.00 176.60 182.40 177.50 177.70 183.40 179.50 179.60 165.40 dollars per bushel 1.84V4 1.86% 1.98 1.85% 1.87'A 1.94 1.8614 1.88% 1.85V* METALS NEW YORK (AP) — Spot nonlerrous metal prices today. Aluminum -111.6 cents per Ib., London Metal Exch. Won. Copper • 344.25 cents Cathode full plate. U.S. destinations. Uad • $992.00 per metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc • 1W.14 cents Ib., delivered. Gold • $609.20 Handy & Herman (only dally quote). Sliver - $11.150 Handy & Harman (only dally quote).

What members have found on this page

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 9,800+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free