The Hays Daily News from Hays, Kansas on June 8, 2006 · Page 6
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The Hays Daily News from Hays, Kansas · Page 6

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A6 THE HAYS DAILY NEWS FOR THE RECORD THURSDAY, JUNE 8,2006 Obituaries Dorothy M, Sander Dorothy M. Sander, 77, Oakley, died Thursday, June 8, 2006, at Logan County Hospital, Oakley. Arrangements are pending with Kennedy-Koster Funeral Home, Oakley. Fred Klaus Fred Klaus, 85, Parker, Ariz., formerly an Ellis County resident, died Saturday, June 3, 2006, in Lake Havasu City, Ariz. He was born Aug. 13,1920, in Munjor to Ray and Pauline (Leiker) Klaus. He married Clementine Herrman in 1946, in Liebenthal. He worked as a laboratory technician for the Bureau of Reclamation. Survivors include his wife, of the home; two sons, Melton Klaus and Donald Klaus; two daughters, Viola Carslake and Cynthia Goyne; a brother, Gerald Klaus, Hays; two sisters, Virginia Geist and Gloria Leiker, both of Hays; seven grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren. A memorial Mass will be at 9 a.m. Friday at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, Parker. Arrangements were made by Parker Funeral Home, Parker. Daniel Conner Daniel Conner, McCracken, died Wednesday, June 7, 2006, at his home. Arrangements are pending with Janousek Funeral Home, La Crosse. Dorothy Marie Sander Dorothy Marie Sander, 77, Oakley, died Thursday, June 8, 2006, at Logan County Hospital, Oakley. She was born Nov. 7,1928, in Logan County to Sidney C. and Flora D. (Hudson) Stwalley. She married Edwin Sander on Oct. 27,1947, in Oakley. She was employed as an advertising customer representative with Mountain Bell Telephone Company, Denver. Survivors include her husband, of the home; two sons, Richard L. Sander, Fruita, Colo., and Robert A. Sander, Golden, Colo.; a daughter, Linda S. Kentch, Topeka; a sister, Mary Louise Schoenberger, Oakley; five grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by a great-granddaughter, Elizabeth Marie Kentch, in 1993. Memorial services will be at 3 p.m. Sunday at Kennedy-Koster Funeral Home, Oakley; private inurnment will follow at a later date. Visitation will be from 2 to 9 p.m. Saturday at the funeral home. Memorials are suggested to Logan County Healthcare Foundation. AoDmoMM SERVICES Stocks Stocks plunge amid rising interest rates Ruth Cheney, 91, Overbrook, formerly of Grainfield, died Monday, June 5, 2006, at Brookside Retirement Community, Overbrook. Services will be at 10 a.m. Friday at United Methodist Church, Grainfield; burial in Grainfield Cemetery. Visitation will be from 5 to 7 p.m. today at Schmitt Funeral Home, 901 S. Main, Quinter, KS 67752. Irene Boucher, 85, Olathe, died Tuesday, June 6, 2006, at Olathe Medical Center. Services will be at 10 a.m. Saturday at Prince of Peace Catholic Church, Olathe; burial In Resurrection Cemetery, Lenexa. Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday at Penwell- Gabel Funeral Home, Olathe, with family present and a rosary service at 7 p.m. Forrest Lovell Elliott, 73, Kirwin, died Monday, June 5, 2006, at Good Samaritan Hospital, Kearney, Neb. Services will be at 10 a.m. Saturday at Olliff-Boeve Memorial Chapel, Phillipsburg; burial in Greenwood Cemetery, Phillips County. Visitation will be until 9 p.m. today and from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, all at the funeral home. Henry A. "Hank" Regler, 78, Mingo, formerly of Colby, died Tuesday, June 6, 2006, in Mingo. Services will be at 10:30 a.m. Friday at Mingo Bible . Church; burial in Beulah Cemetery, Colby. Visitation will be until 8 p.m. today at Harrison Chapel, Colby, with family present from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Ralph Earl Woodward, 79, died Friday, June 2, 2006. Memorial services will be at 11 a.m. Saturday at The Church of the Brethren, Quinter. Visitation will be from 10:30 a.m. until time of service Saturday at the church. OBITUARY POIICY The Hays Daily News will publish a basic, standard obituary free of charge for people with direct ties to the newspaper's circulation area. If survivors desire to add information to an obituary, they may do so for an additional charge. Completely custom obituaries are handled as . paid advertising. For more information, call (785) 628-1081. ' MEETING: Participants discuss law enforcement CONTINUED FROM PAGE A1 The commissions decided to form a joint committee and meet in three to six months to discuss the issue again. Consolidation talk began with dispatch in the Law Enforcement Center. Channell said the expense should be shared to renovates the. :,>.. space. Hays city commissioners expressed concern about some of the expense, since moving dispatch into the Emergency Operations Center would activate a chain of events and renovations in the county building. "The EOC is a jointly-used room," said Ellis County EMS Director Kerry McCue. "It's a mutual benefit to both the city and county to pay to relocate it." Discussion about the LEG naturally led to consolidating city IN OTHER ACTION Other Items discussed by the commissions Include: • Forming a transportation committee to examine the prices associated with establishing a count/wide transportation system. The system could be similar to Reno County, which has a fixed route system In the city and county, and door-to-door pickup for patrons with disabilities. • Forming a business incubator at the Hadley Center. Ellis County Coalition for Economic Development Executive Director Mike Mlchaelis said the •(Somttiis'sioni'would need (S-WfW lK manager for the project. ' ' ;'" ••••: "Successful Incubators pay their i manager a great deal of money," Michaells said. Hays City Commissioner Henry Schwaller IV suggested both the city and county Incorporate $50,000 Into their budget for the expense. Michaelis said an Incubator would require at least a 10-year commitment to be successful. • Enacting a Geographic Information System for the city and county. A GIS system is beneficial in economic development, Mlchaelis told the commissions. Each commission will discuss the issue individually. • The preparedness for a bird flu pandemic. Addle Homburg, Ellis County Emergency Management coordinator, said she is working with the public health department and Hays Medical Center to conduct a mass casualty drill in September. • Future space needs for both the city and county. Ellis County Commissioner Vernon Berens said the county has a committee examining the issue. and county law enforcement. "Consolidation can be a good thing," said Ellis County Sheriff Ed Harbin. "We're pretty much as consolidated as we can be now without wearing the same uniform." The discussion shifted from the Law Enforcement Center to the waterline to the Ellis County Fairgrounds. "We'd be willing to pay for the i line if i you will i upgrade it from 8 to 12 inches," Channell said. Steward said the commissions need to find common ground. "Instead of taking this piecemeal, I would like to see us try to have a little bit of vision for the future," Steward said. To assist this vision, Ellis County Commissioner Vernon Berens said he'd like to see the commission chairs meet monthly. "Time is not on our side," Schwaller said. "If we don't consider it and take action now, we'll have to react later." CITY, COUNTY TALK EMER6ENCY MANAGEMENT By KAREN MIKOLS HAYS DAILY NEWS City and county commissioners made efforts to iron out concerns regarding joint response with the Hays Fire Department and Ellis County EMS on Wednesday night. "It came across as one- sided," said Ellis County Commission Chairman Christopher Channell. "The way they came up with the joint response list was they .way; it sh0ttla?ive:b,een;ddne initially." •, < -., ,. ,.,,. ( Despite concerns on the county's side, Hays City Commissioner Troy Hickman said the city wants to improve service for city residents. "No one ever criticized, the EMS for anything," Hickman said. "We want to save lives; it's so simple." , Hays Mayor Wayne Billinger said the city is not interested in managing or micromanaging EMS. Even with these assurances, Channell said the joint response, which begins July I, was not approached properly. The city approved the measure with minimal input from the county. "You'll see very little difference in response times," Ellis County EMS Director Kerry McCue said. "We don't need the fire department on every call." McCue and Hays Fire Chief Jim Brown drafted a list of 11 situations that would trigger a joint response. The extra hands will be helpful, but would be more effective if the city had more than one fire station, McCue said. Hays City Commissioner Henry Schwaller IV said plans are to add two stations in the next few years and suggested loeatinguan:aiabti.t;"jiJi> lance in the stations tcrhelpoi" « disperse the EMS fleet- .•<" -.&•. •/ "When the fire department expands, we would have come to you to suggest joint response," McCue said. The response will begin July 1 as planned. "I'm a little disappointed in the way it was handled by both sides," Channell said. "This is a system that is going to evolve one way or another." Steward was more passionate about the upcoming start. "Let's look out for the well- being of the citizens of Hays and do this," Steward said. "We're talking about improving an already good system. Why not do that?" Reporter Karen Mikols can be reached at (785) 628-1081, ext. 143, or by e-mail at kmlkol8@dallynews.net. AL-ZARQAWI: Group might retaliate against U,S, CONTINUED FROM PAGE A1 "I am more optimistic than ever that a free and stable Iraq can be achieved," said Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R- Tenn. House Majority Leader John Boehner, R-Ohio, declared, "Americans are safer today." The U.S. government had offered up to $25 million for information leading to al-Zarqawi's killing or capture, putting him on par with Saddam, bin Laden and his top deputy, Ayman al-Za- wahri. U.S. authorities are unclear who would succeed al-Zarqawi as the leader of al-Qaida in Iraq. A defense intelligence official noted that a number of al-Zarqawi's deputies have been taken out in recent months, which could cause chaos among the group's top tier. The official, who requested anonymity because events were still unfolding, warned that there could be retaliation in the United States or elsewhere. Bush, who did not address the debate over the withdrawing of U.S. troops, will meet Monday at Camp David with members of his national security team and other members of his Cabinet to discuss the next steps in Iraq. On Tuesday, Iraq's new ambassador to the United States will join the group for a teleconference discussion with the prime minister and members of the Iraqi cabinet. Bush learned of the killing Wednesday afternoon from national security adviser Stephen Hadley, who had received a phone call from Baghdad shortly before 3 p.m. CST. "Coalition and Iraqi forces persevered through years of near misses and false leads, and they never gave up," Bush said in praising U.S.-led troops who killed al-Zarqawi. In the Rose Garden, Bush read from prepared notes, shifting his weight from foot to foot. Hadley and Vice President Dick Cheney, standing under a tree, watched him deliver the uplifting news for a White House that has been weighed down by waning public confidence in his handling of the war. In AP-Ipsos polling this week, 59 percent said the United States made a mistake in going to war in Iraq, a new high. And only 44 percent said it is likely that a stable, democratic government will be established in Iraq, the lowest number since the war began. Bush hailed defeat of Zarqawi as "an opportunity for Iraq's new government to turn the tide of this struggle," but said more terrorist and insurgent violence is to be expected. "We have tough days ahead of us in Iraq that will require the continued patience of the American people," he said. Killing al-Zarqawi allowed U.S. counterterrorism officials only a brief sigh of relief. Officials have said that the loss of key leaders like bin Laden, Zawahri and al- Zarqawi — especially if they were lost in rapid succession — could cause the jihadist movement to fracture into smaller groups. The U.S. government has mis- understood al-Zarqawi at times. Before the April 2003 collapse of Saddam's government, the Bush administration cited his presence in Iraq among its evidence of contacts between al-Qai- da and the former regime — and part of its justification for the Iraq war. While al-Zarqawi is believed to have been in Iraq, later assessment found he was not operating as part of al-Qaida then. But by October 2004, however, al-Zarqawi pledged his allegiance to bin Laden. Born in Jordan in 1966, al-Zar- qawi developed ties to muja- hedeen, or holy warriors, while fighting alongside them during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in the 1980s. Intelligence officials believe al-Zarqawi had cells or links to Muslim extremists worldwide, including Iraq, Afghanistan, Turkey, Spain, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, Pakistan and Kuwait. FBI and other government officials did not believe al-Zarqawi had operatives within the U.S. under his command. RALLY; Events planned for general public during weekend gathering CONTINUED FROM PAGE A1 Public attendees can get a full- course meal for $7.25 at the Doerfler's Harley Davidson Party from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday The event will have live entertainment and end with a fireworks show. The culmination of the weekend will be a parade that begins 3 p.m. Saturday at Movie Gallery, 2703 Vine, and ends at Lewis Field Stadium on the Fort Hays State University campus. "We just want everybody to be patient with all the traffic this weekend and be careful as well," Kuhn said. "There are going to be many, many motorcycles on the roads this weekend. When you come to a stop sign look twice and be careful." H.O.G. members live in more than 130 countries around the world. There are more than 1,400 chapters. Only about 50 days ago, the member mark reached 1 million. Reporter MJcah Mertes can be reached at (785) 628-1801, ext. 139, or by e-mail at mmertea&dallyrwws.net. NEW YORK (AP) — Interest rate concerns sent stocks spiraling for a fourth straight session today as investors continued fretting about higher lending costs choking demand and hurting the global economy. The Dow Jones industrial average is down about 460 points this week. The death of Iraq's main terrorist leader pushed down oil prices, but the pullback did little to relieve worries about interest rate increases by the European Central Bank and in India. Some strength in the U.S. dollar was countered by an inversion of short- and long-term bond yields. Without any fresh data to offer clues about the economy's health, investors were unwilling to place bets while they assessed the likelihood of more rate hikes from the Federal Reserve. This week's signals that the Fed would sacrifice economic growth to keep boosting rates and contain inflation saddled stocks and Jed steep declines in stock markets worldwide. "I suspect the market is exaggerating the downside move amid fears that the Fed may overextend its tightening policy and dampen economic activity more than anticipated," said Peter Cardillo, chief strategist at S.W. Bach & Co. However, he added that a rebound in trading volume could be a sign that the market is reaching a near-term low point. In midday trading, the Dow plunged 143.36, or 1.31 percent, to 10,787.54. The Dow is about 70 points away from falling into negative territory for 2006 Broader stock indicators also fell sharply. The Standard & Poor's 500 index was down 16.93, or 1.35 percent, at 1,239.22, turning negative for the year; the Nasdaq composite index dropped 42.87, or 1.99 percent, to 2,108.93. NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE Most active stocks at noon (11 a.m. Central time) Sales High Low Last Chg ABB Ltd .099 30492 11.19 10.77 10.88—.74 AGCO 20710 21.85 20.91 21.00—.93 AMR 19337 23.99 23.20 23.32—.45 AT&T Inc 1.33 88449 26.96 26.47 26.48—.11 AbtLab 1.18 22095 43.15 42.47 42.50—.39 AdvMOpt 3288547.9045.8647.12 + 1.27 AMD 128671 27.70 26.2326.37—1.63 Agnico g .03 22541 29.36 27.4927.75—1.82 Alcoa .6044239 30.05 28.9228.97—1.08 AllegTch .40 35442 58.48 54.78 55.97—3.28 Altria 3.20 49890 71.65 70.38 70.41—.54 AMovilL s .848 3268331.11 30.0030.23—1.29 AmExp .601 20136 53.96 53.02 53.12—.36 AmlnlGp II .661 2821761.01 60.23 60.59+ .36 Anadark s .36 30868 47.40 45.8446.07—1.25 Apache .4029291 60.5058.7559.15—1.92 ArchC S .242317342.9940.5840.96—1.99 ArchDan .40 35369 41.45 38.7338.75—2.82 BMP BillLI .646 3844839.5837.7538.12—2.27 BJ Svcs S .20 37535 34.93 33.90 34.06—.88 BakrHu .52 31691 80.59 78.5979.00—2.06 BkofAm 2 55314 49.11 48.52 48.74—.11 BarrickG .22 30207 28.51 27.4627.51—1.29 BellSouth 1.16 31429 35.04 34.42 34.53—.02 Boeing 1.2024368 81.84 80.0680.27—1.19 BoslonSci 33924 20.15 19.84 19.86—.36 BrMySq 1.12 21368 25.28 24.71 25.09+ .19 BurlNSF .80 X21122 73.00 70.41 71.27—2.94 CBS B n .721 26662 26.97 26.49 26.70 + .02 Cameco gs.16 19360 37.98 36.1736.17—2.69 Carnival 1 21231 38.18 37.55 37.57—.88 Calerpil s 13948167.5465.0065.06—1.68 Cendant .11) 27337 16.01 15.63 15.64—.36 ChesEng .2059183 28.90 27.9028.00—1.10 Chevron 2.08f 54189 57.17 55.6855.92—1.25 CircCity .07 27052 28.60 27.48 27.64—.65 Citigrp 1.96 68120 50.20 49.69 49.76—.19 CocaCI 1.24 30893 43.52 43.16 43.22—.16 Coeur 42223 4.57 4.41 4.43—.19 CVRD s .626 57502 21.13 20.3020.38—1.01 ConocPhil 1.44 65187 60.22 59.01 59.28—1.24 Coming 115241 22.17 21.10 21.14—.81 DR Morton .40 20191 23.40 22.86 22.95—.36 DevonE .45 26612 53.40 52.0952.85—1.29 Disney .271 56540 30.48 29.70 29.83—.82 DowChm 1.50 32856 39.03 37.7937.89—1.19 DuPonl 1.48 25074 41.01 39.8239.84—1.25 ETrada I :•. >,, ..120864 .22.98-22.16 .'22.18-».52i EMC--Cp. 87685 12.28 11.99 12.00—.-12 EOG' Res -.24 24579' 59.82 '58.30'58;56^-2.69' ElPasoCp .16 23411 14.82 14.50 14.51-r.39 Elan 33309 15.90 15.30 15.35—.65 EnCana .401 26763 46.66 45.9245.99—1.20 ENSCO .10 19839 45.99 44.09 45.02—1.48 ExxonMbl 1.28 12206358.8557.84 57.98—.84 FPL Grp 1.50 19332 41.20 40.57 40.98 + .23 FordM .40 93465 6.82 6.65 6.65—.14 FredMac II 1.88x2137858.2557.0058.11+ .13 FMCG 1.25a 45710 51.07 47.5047.83—3.42 FumBrds .64 19603 20.58 18.79 18.85—1.73 Genentch 2161078.2876.6076.88—1.21 GenElec 1 97330 34.47 34.12 34.18—.22 GnMotr 1 47976 25.33 24.64 24.82—.17 GM db32B 1.31 1921817.26 17.25 17.25—.01 GoldFLId .136 23991 18.20 17.5217.61—1.52 Goldcrp g .18 46356 27.05 25.5925.63—1.84 GoldmanSI .40126952 150.67 145.30 145.30—4.65 Hallibtn .60 6772470.2568.7668.79—1.56 HewleltP .32 8426030.9129.0029.73—1.20 HomeDp .60 38031 37.08 36.56 36.68—.03 Honwlllnll .91 2252039.4437.9838.01—1.48 ICICI Bk .3962119924.1122.0022.43—2.37 iShBrazil .58e 3204135.2934.1534.24—1.37 iShJapan .06e 318144 12.95 12.74 12.74—.60 IShTaiwan .146 3285212.00 11.62 11.63—.71 Sales High Low Last Chg IBM 1.201 39010 79.58 77.62 78.21—.94 InlRecl 27699 42.37 41.03 41.04 + .87 JPMorgCh 1.36 5377042.09 41.50 41.55—.70 JohnJn 1.501 37580 61.75 61.04 61.41 + .24 KindMorg 3.50 22560 100.50 100.09 100.12—.58 L-3 Com .75 21968 80.25 76.95 77.60 + .67 LehmnBr s .482127966.0663.4063.49—1.97 Lucent 173155 2.47 2.40 2.41—.07 MEMC II 36562 33.19 30.0030.07—3.11 McDnlds .671 25176 33.64 33.16 33.20-.12 McAfee 29691 24.41 23.41 23.43—.72 Medtmlc .39 19894 51.63 50.97 51.05—.38 Merck 1.52 40564 34.34 33.55 33.57—.39 MerrillLyn 1 29762 71.11 69.0369.06—1.93 MicronT 92698 15.95 15.12 15.16—.66 Mlrant n 19122 24.40 23.60 23.64—.82 MitsuUFJ .066 30913 13.16 12.38 12.47—.72 MorgStan 1.08 23496 59.59 57.9758.07—1.07 Motorola .201 94888 21.07 20.32 20.36—.82 Nabors S 65762 32.69 31.78 31.99—.76 NOilVarco 20121 62.1059.1859.60—3.67 NalSeml .12 30975 24.00 22.97 23.47—.68 NewmlM .40 49327 49.88 48.2848.33—2.01 NewsCpA .176 26437 19.06 18.74 18.97—.07 NobleCorp .16 22911 64.6263.1064.07—1.07 NokiaCp .46e 72195 20.35 19.78 19.90—.62 NorflkSo .64 30934 49.41 46.72 46.86—2.55 NorteINt II 171658 2.16 2.05 2.06—.11 Nucor s .40a 33807 47.81 44.80 45.34—2.58 OcciPet 1.44 29233 93.70 91.7092.26—2.46 PeabdyE s .243795554.2551.2551.70—3.65 Petrobrs 3e 33099 80.67 75.97 76.36—5.44 Pfizer .96 149937 23.84 23.44 23.50—.41 PhelpsD s .75 55820 78.55 75.50 75.61—3.21 ProctGam 1.241 7285055.1053.3054.45 + 1.21 QwestCm 66024 7.77 7.64 7.66—.01 RadloShk .25 20068 15.13 14.17 14.30—.90 Revlon 68401 1.71 1.54 1.58—.13 RiteAld 33775 4.73 4.46 4.47—.21 RylCarb .60 20504 36.93 35.5835.68—1.75 SUude 20982 33.35 32.52 32.76—78 SchergPI .22 33589 19.78 19.35 19.35—.31 Schlmb S .507155560.1857.6357.95—2.56 SeagateT .32 45618 22.58 21.51 22.05—.33 Solectm 19296 3.54 3.44 3.44—.07 SthnCopp 8.2462091778.50 73.0573.13—7.59 SwnEngy s 19202 28.18 26.50 26.84r-1.65 SprintNex, .10. .53811 21.63 20.83 20.96-^.43 ST Gold' ; '" ''41934 61.53'oUmd.BI^T' Suncor-g — :32f22967 74i40 7.1.5071,80-^3.43 TXU Cp s 1.65 26890 58.32 56.54 57.04—.47 TaiwSemi .32r 76114 8.97 8.69 8.73—.41 Target .40 27422 49.70 48.40 48.47—.43 Texlnst .12 65100 31.01 30.15 30.25—.47 TimeWam .20 11558717.51 17.26 17.26—.35 TitanMt s 74406 35.41 32.2032.72—3.38 TollBros s 25327 26.98 26.17 26.22—.20 Transocn 49531 76.20 73.7573.90—2.50 Tribune .72 1985931.7330.81 30.83+ .52 Tycolntl .40 32238 27.14 26.46 26.58-.46 UtdMicro ,01r 43777 3.12 3.01 3.01—.13 USSteel .60) 43201 60.01 57.80 58.08—2.53 UtdTech 1.061 25380 60.20 59.07 59.35—.67 Utdhlth .031 24614 46.95 45.86 46.15—.13 ValeroE S .321 70893 58.40 56.00 56.21—2.45 VerizonCm 1.62 5286232.1531.29 31.41—.43 Wachovia 2.04 23701 54.53 53.84 54.00—.44 WalMart .671 57269 47.51 47.00 47.12+ .08 Walgm .26 20746 41.70 40.99 41.00—.29 WA Mull 2.041 19927 45.48 45.00 45.08—.12 Weathllnt s 29988 49.01 47.1847.31—2.56 WellsFrgo 2.08 3054468.65 67.50 68.16-.07 WmsCos .361 44063 21.50 20.61 20.62—.98 Wyeth 11 19455 45.00 44.32 44.63—.48 XTO Engy .30b 34450 39.25 37.21 37.21—2.26 Midday markets LOCAL INTEREST Courtesy Darrell C. Selbel, Edward Jorwt Price ChanQe Alltell Corp 60.32 -.70 Anheuser Busch 45.10 -.07 AT&T 26.26 -.33 Almos Energ Common 26.65 + .04 BankAmorica Corp 48.75 -.10 Baxter 38.02 -,12 BP 66.54 -2.00 Caremark Hx 49.24 -.67 Commerce Banks 50.82 -.22 ConAgra 21.84 -.59 Deere & Co 78.05 -2.54 Dul & Phelp 10.10 -.14 Duke Energy 28.38 + .02 El Paso Corp 14.44 -.46 Halliburton 68.59 -1.76 Kinder Morgan 100.13 -.57 KellwoodCo 28.66 -.55 LIVESTOCK Courtesy DACO Inc. Est. Cattle Slaughter Choice 3-beef (cut-out) Western Ks Cattle Peoria Hogs CHICAGO MERCANTILE Courteay DACO Inc. Prev High Prev Low 124,000 $154.57 $83.50 $4900 c«nu per pound Prev Clote Noon Quote Live Beef Cattle June August October December 80.40 80.65 84.20 86.65 79.65 79.85 83.40 86.57 80.35 80.55 83.90 86.42 79.60 80.25 83.85 85.90 Feeder Cattle August September October November Hogs June July August October 109.97 109.15 108.27 107.30 71.70 70.70 89.20 59.50 109.30 108.60 107.70 106.55 70.60 69.72 68.40 59.00 109.40 108.85 108.22 107.30 71.42 70.16 69.16 59.35 109.65 108.85 107.85 106.95 72.30 70.70 69.27 68.95 Pork belllM July August February 87.60 84.45 83.55 84.30 81.40 83.55 86.92 83.05 83.55 88.75 85.40 84.60 Noon quotea Price Change Kroger 19.79 ..07 McDonald's 33.11 ..21 Microsoft 22.02 -.02 MolsonCoore 67.79 -.15 Northwest Nat. Gas 34.73 -.16 Raytheon Co 43.08 -1.05 Semco Energy Inc 5.45 -.02 Southwest Gas Corp 28.93 0 Sprint Nextel 20.80 -.59 Sysko Corp 30.63 + .01 Sykes Enterprises 15.55 -1.21 Lowes Co 60.64 -.35 Home Depot Inc 36.72 + .01 Liz Claiborne 37.60 -.24 Union Pacific 84.46 -2.71 WalMart 47.10 +.06 Westar Energy 21.39 -.02 HAYS CASH GRAINS Courteey Mkllmd Marketing doiiare Locel cash wheat 4.50 Local cash milo s'eo KANSAS CITY WHEAT Courtety DACO Inc. dollar, per buehel Prev Prev Prev Noon High LOW Cloae Quote July 4.69 4.74 4.87 4.84 September 4.97 4.83 4.96 % 4.92 December 5.05V4 4.93V4 5.04V4 601V4 OIL Courteey Daco Inc. Uollin per Barrel Kansas Crude, noon quote .... $62.25 NY Spot Crude, noon quote.... $69.35 -$1.47 LIVESTOCK St. Joseph, Mo., Stockyards Feeder Cattle Auction Open, Mid-Session and Close (or Wednesday. Receipts: 800 Last Week 800 Year Ago: 1625 Compared to last week, feeder cattle sold steady to 4.00 higher In a light test of comparable weights. This weetfe auction featured three toads of 650-760 Ib hetlera, which war* not well tested last week. The balance of the run was mostly small tots of average qualty calves, which found good buyer demand. Local pastures are quickly becoming dry, but the long term forecast Is lor cooler temperatures and above avenge rainfall over the next two weeks. CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE Courteey DACO Inc. i Piev ; Prev Prev Noon High Low Clow Quote Wheat dollar* per buihel July 3.91 3.60 3.87 V, 3.86 V4 September 4.05 V4 3.95 4.03 V4 4.01 V4 December 4.22V4 4.12 4.19% 4.18V4 Cor " dollare per buahel July 2.61% 2.44V4 2.61 2.46V4 September 2.63 2.56 2.62% 2.58% December 2.77'/4 2.70 2.76% 2.71% Soybeans dollar, per buahel July 6.01 5.90 6.97 5.90 August 6.07 5.97 6.03% 6.96% November 6.27 6.16 6.24V4 6.17 Soybean meal domnpenon July 182.80 179.80 182.10 18000 August 183.40 180.70 182.80 18080 October 184.80 182.40 184.20 182.80 Oatt dollaraperbuahel July 1.88 1.85'/4 1.88 1.88 September 1.91 1.87V4 1.90% 189 December 1.89% 1.86 1.68V4 1.88V4 METALS NEW YORK (AP) — Spot nonferrous metal prices today. Copper - 408.60 cents Cathode full plate, U.S. destinations. ^ JJoppsr 374.90 cents per Ib., N.Y. Merc spot Lead • $984.00 per metric ton, London Metal cxch. Zinc • 1/2.72 cents Ib., delivered Gold • $614.00 Handy ft Harman (only dally Silver • NY Mete silver spot month Wednesday (11 .967 up $0.052. .

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