Mt. Vernon Register-News from Mt Vernon, Illinois on June 14, 1951 · Page 6
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Mt. Vernon Register-News from Mt Vernon, Illinois · Page 6

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Thursday, June 14, 1951
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THE REGISTER-NEWS — MT. VERNON, ILLINOIS THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 1951 MT. ViRNON REGISTER.NEW^ IOAiL.S BZCEFT SUMDAT) MT. TCRMOM MEWS EJITABUSHED 1871 MT TISMOM REOISTEB ESTABLISHED ISM OOHSOUDATXD BEPT1MBE» U. 1980 SDWIM SACKAWAT 0, J THOMPSOH ~. ORUi) MrrCALT «. U tHEHOaW . Editor .Builnetf Maotter Newn Editor .Plant Superintendeot MEMBBB or TBB AS8001ATCD PRESS— Tb« At«)cl«t«d ftMt to weludTely tn- UtM to th« ••• tor til* pubUoatlOD ot »U ••wt er««i«d l« « «• not otherwJi* «r*lit- •d ID tbl* paPOT •>•• t^* "x:** Entered u Second Claw matter for trani- portatlon throufh the maili at the Poet Office at Mount Vernon. lUinois, under the •et of March 3, 1878. SUBSCltlPTlOM KATES Subscrtptlone must be paid in'sdran Bj matl. Jafterioa count; and ad' lotnint countie* per rear —. 0 tno* 93.75: 3 mot 93.26 1 roo. By mall outside .lafferson aod ad- Jolnlnj countlef within 360 milee: rear $8 OU' 6 mon $6 00. 3 mo*. $3.25 per einrl* month Outnidr 250 mile*, year $9.00: 9 moi S6 7fi: 3 moi S3 76: on* month Dclirered by carrier in city per 90.00 1.00 1.2S 1.80 M A Thought For Today I was glad when they said unto me, Let as go int' the house of the Lord.—Psalms 122:1. • • • • In the Church of Christ one little worker can mar the whole by failing to fulfill his office. There is a place for each. Find youi place if you are not already in it, and obey the Saviour's command, "Go work in my vineyard"—the command of a king which you disobey •t the peril of losing the reward of the faithful. —Aughey. EDITORIAL FRANCE CAN NO LONGER ALIBI FOR DELAY ON TROOPS FOR IKE M OVED BY POLITICAL AND MILITARY REALITIES and a genuine understanding of an ally's problems, responsible Americans have leaned over backwards to avoid judging harshly the slow pace of French rearmtunent. It was recognized that the French, like other Europeans, needed the psychological boost of knowing that America would support European defense. The recent landing of the first units of a fresh U. S. division in Germany, plus the definite promise of three more divisions, tffords that fundamental assurance. Allowances were made, too, for the fact that France had an slection coming up this year and that French leaders had to tread easy on some of the delicate issues affecting rearmament. That election will take place Jime 17. Afterwards the French will no longer be able to argue reasonably that they cannot take certain necessary steps for fear of unpopularity. • * • I N OTHER WORDS, JUNE 17 is in the nature of. a deadline in the French rearmament program. Beyond that time, neither Americans nor any other free peoples concerned for the safety of Europe are likely to welcome excuses for delay. The original target for a European defense army called for 60 divisions by 1953. Of these 30 to 35 were to be organized by the end of 1951. But the North Atlantic Treaty Organization under General Eisenhower now has scaled this figure down to 25 divisions this winter. The French have promised to supply 10 of these 25. Defense Minister Jules Moch says this goal will be achieved, though some European observers are doubtfunl. Most disturbing is the fact that only half the total would be in the field. The remainder would be held in reserve, capable of being mobilized on three days' notice. It's questionable whether French soldiers resting comfortably in thir homes would act as an effective deterrent to a Russian intent on aggression In Western Europe. Three days is a long time in this age of sudden assault. * • • R EPORTS FROM FRANCE INDICATE that the French are not yet even preparing ground- installations to receive the troops of the expanding European force. By fall, the flow of American arms abroad will be substantial. K Eisenhower's mission is to have any meaning, the troops should be on hand to use those weapons. Until America committed fresh forces to Europe to bolsted Allied morale, the burden of proof of earnest purpose was upon us. Now it is upon the Europeans, and particularly the French. The time for alibis, legitimate or otherwise, is passing. Not even the shortage of officers caused by French participation in the Indochina fighting can be an excuse. For that war is not likely to end soon, and Europe's defense can't be left to chance until it is concluded. In the last half of 1951 the world will learn much about how the' French value their freedom. 'SCRAP OF PAPER'? P EOPLE IN THE WESTERN NATIONS are well aware of the nationalist ferment which is pushing the government of Iran into extremist positions on the issue of taking over the British-Owned Anglo-Iranian Oil Co. But Iranian officials may come to regret the violence of their tirades against any and all opposition. Recently they flatly told the World Court the issue was none of its business. '>Yet Iran is a signatory tjO the articles establishing that court, and is thus bound legally to respect its jurisdiction and its findings. Some day Iran may decide it needs the Court, or the United Nations. Its irrational flaunting of its own extremist views will not then •tand it in good stead. Asiotic Animol Answtr to Previous Puzzio BOMCONTAl t .5D «piet«d anlnial • SuntontM NegroM tOOparatieaole llBafor* ItltUnaUva to — — and . .Muthtrn Alia ieKfilTtaJy tSTraa fluid aiiUUnt ISBavaraf* MOppoMdto 40iipateh«d SLactura platform 6 Ages 7 East Indi«t Ub.) SCoan* flia U Storahouia li Staff trs MAccompllili ; SO Pastry . tl'An (^) iZIVem' SISehtma Sf Rriiyar ending St Z)eaiMtie slave S»N«tatlve reply (SOChief priest of ashrliia S4 Injured SeOrattad (htr.) STAnjr *SIV^lwlnd SSTMur 41 Bowling term 41 Hifh mourn dTOiMk latter dStepetuous 8 fis«aikepart Toettiedwiieel •S Mafia HOeelk 32PiUercd 33 Retains 17 Hammer head 34 Rabbit 24 Heavy blow 35 Distinct part as Canvas shelter 40 Menial 26 Poker stake 41 Bodies of 37 Mournful water sound 42 Peel 43 Symbol for silver 44 Pause 45 God of love 46 Mimicker 51 Comparative suffix S3 Son of Nut ^SuHUa ndSK ^vnnoAi. 'A »«iii'iH<l«»i«< t via JBVwiwn^w \ (SSymMfsr , ''I'l xenon' ' \ ^» newer They'U Do It Every Time By Jimmy Hatlo ^yibW .»«ET -mis: / *AUU006H THE ODDS j WERE TEN TO ONE /\QAlNST r Hl-M, Sar SOeCAR FEAra-ESSLV BURST THftoUeM TWE COOR OF THE OUTLAWS' HlOE-OUT AW SifteLEMANDEPiy OVERFOWEREO TWE DESPERATE <5UWMEN'«' REFERRING TO HiS BRAVE DEEP LATER ^TWE INTRERO UAWMAM SMRU <SeED IT OFF, SAYlNO, 'SMix:i<s.' /^Jy OFRCER WOULD *^ HAVE. AC7BD IN UK£ /MANNER!'* I WAS OM lUAT JOB- TUE SAfaSE WAS MiDlMca Bm^P A TRES. FOR THO VV 'HILE WE STARVED T^'EM GUVS OUT""/IMC? THE STORY 'S A LITTLE coareyED- IT WAS Two KiOS WITH AIR RIFLES — . TWE SARC5E IS BEGlNMlNG TO SEI/EV'£ hi)5 OWM PUeLIOTy -HE BURST IKTO HIS WIFE'S aeANl KITCHEN TOOAV wrrw >MUC>P/ SHOES"" SHORT-TEA<PERE0 WIFE WXII:DVE K ACTED IN LKE HE 60T 25 V BUCKS fOR ^ £?ESCRlBWa THAT CASE- BUT HE'S SPENT 50 BUCKS ON /MAGAZINES The World Today * * * * BY JAMES MARLOW Secrets for Congress WASHINGTON, June 14.— It's your Congress, so iiow would you answer this one: Should the executive branch of the government—such as the State and Defense Departments — tell Congress the deepest secrets in foreign affairs and in military planning- The question was raised by Lt. Gen. Albert C. Wedemeyer before the Senate committees investigating General MacArthur's firing. Wedemeyer said no secrets should be kept from Congress. • • * ANYONE ANSWERING THE question has to divide it in two: 1. Members of Congress are elected by the people to represent them in guarding their welfare. The biggest brass in the Pentagon and State Department are simply hired servants of the people. Therefore, it would seem that the people, through Congi-ess, should be judge of what their welfare is and must know what's going on at all times, since whatever the State and Defense Departments do involves the public welfare. It's assumed that these hired people, the big brass, can be trusted to do what they think best for the country. But, unless Congress knows what's going on, our fate may wind up in the hands of a few hired officials. 2. But would it really be wise to tell members of Congress all the secrets? If one of them blabbed, the information might enable an enemy to hurt this country or even destroy It, for the more people who know a secret the less secret it is. In short; Can all members of Congress be trusted to keep their mouths shut about things they shouldn't discuss in public ? • * • PERHAPS THERE'S NO SINGLE ANSWER on the biggest secrets except one that lies in the middle-ground, such as happened with the development of the atomic bomb during World War II. That's been called the best kept secret of the war but the members of the congressional committees which voted money for the project didn't know precisely what the money was for. They took it on trust from the executive branch that the money was needed for highly secret work. Right now the one group in Congress, above all, with the best record for keeping secrets is the joint committee on atomic energy. It has 18 members. It's their job to ride herd on our atomic program. But there are some things which these members don't want to know. They have refused from time to time to be told certain facts although later, when the situation changed, they may have asked for those facts. • • • ONE RIEMBER OF THIS COMMITTEE —Senator Edwin C. Johnson, Colorado Democrat—caused a bit of a sensation in November, 1949, when he had a few things to say over television about the bomb, such as how much more powerful our bombs were then—and will be —than the ones dropped on Japan in 1945. Johnson denied he had spilled any secrets. He said it was all "old stuff." Leaks in Congress have become notorious. There are no secrets at the wide open public hearings. It's in the executive sessions behind closed doors that the highly confidential information is given Congress by officials of the executive branch. The most recent example of a big leak was in March when a member of a Senate committee showed a reporter a copy of a statement which General Eisenhower had made to the committee a month before. • * * EISENHOWER, trying to build up Europe's defenses, said he'd drop an atom bomb on the Russians if he thought it-worthwhile; and he said 12 American divisions could hold the Breton peninsula in France against .the Russians. One reporter who covers the House and spends a lot of his time pumping members about what happens in those executive sessions said: "I think I could find out anything I wanted to know." Then, perhaps because he thinks he works harder at the pumping business than reporters on the Senate side of the capitol, he added: "I have to spend a nickel to buy a man a cup of coffee. On the other side the senators bust down the door to buy the reporters coffee." A reporter j)n the Senate side said his work wasn't that easy, that he has to use a pumping sys- Item of hjiiiown. New Airport for National Capitol By Associated Press •^WASHINGTON. June 14. — A new S14,000,000 supplemental airport for Washington will be located near Burke station, in Fairfax county. Va. Secretary of Commerce Sawyer announced this at a new conference yesterday. He said he had authorized the Justice Department to start condemnation proceedings for land needed for a site of approximately 4,500 acres. Pay Raises for State's Attorneys By Associated Press SPRINGFIELD, ID., June 14.— A bill to raise salaries of downstate's attorneys from $1,000 to 6!1,.500 a year, depending on population, is up to Governor Stevenson. The House completed passage of it yesterday. The proposed pay scale is graduated from 53,000 a vear for smallest counties to $10,000 for the largest. From 2 P. M. I'SXruv- Fox Theatres Bi^Today thru Sat. 2 — Super Attractions — 2 DenK MORGAN Patricia NEAL Steve OCHRAN In RATON MSS iRMM ^Today thru Sat. UCHTNINC SIRIKBJWia' AUO STAMINC RjcM TODO • MniB McCAMMOa A WAiHti liov riCTuec COOL Routing Rangeland Renegades! A Big Family Program fwiLLIAM DEMAREST 2p. Chapter No. 7 — •'FLYING DISC MAN FROM MARS" "Mario Lanza! New Idol! Hottest singer in a decade!' "The Best Musical of the Month!..."—louel/o Porioni M-G-M (The Best in Musicals) prtuntt ••mm COtOI »Y I The big musical with 27 exciting songs ttWs the story ot the [ famed Caruso, who sang his way from a iovily tavern to the top of the v/or\<i t IfeCHNIOOLOR STARRING , MARIO ^ANN L ANZA B LYTH DOROTHY JARMILA KmSTEN-NOVOTNA BLANCHE T hebom - NOW - FEATURE • ^^^^^^^^^SHOWING 6:57" 9:12 Mmmum The Doflor Says By EOWIM e. JORDAN. M.D. Writteo For NEA Service Peoplc 't Difference In Size The human body grows most rapidly before birth. Increase in size continues to be rather fast for a year after^vards — on the average a baby triples Its birth- weight in the first year. Height and weight keep increasing until maturity though more slowly and somewhat irregularly. Some children grow up faster than others, some get stouter, and some thinner and all this frequently worries them or their parents enormously. There is a more or less normal pattern of growth for each child. One of the most ingenious ways of measuring this pattern is by means of the Wetzel grid which if followed for long enough shows quite well whether a particular child is growing as he or she should. If not the grid will help to decide whether some changes should be made in the diet, or whether tests for underlying illness should be made or other measures taken. There are many things which influence growth. To some extent size runs in families: if the parents are usually tall the children are likely to bo above average in this respect also. Diet undoubtedly plays a part, probably in height as well as weight. Climate may have something to do with the picture also. Sex is a factor: boys on the average when grown are taller and heavier than girls though around 11 or 12 years old girls are often bigger than boys of the same age. Kids Grow Bigger Now Studies of college students have shown that for at least three generations the sons have averaged taller and heavier than their fathers. This is interesting but what e-xactly causes it is rather ^obscure. An important factor which influences growth has been traced to the pituitary gland which lies at the base of the brain. The front or anterior part of this gland manufactures a hormone which greatly influences growth. In some cases it produces too much of this hormone with the result that the individual develops into a human giant one of whom has been reported to stand over nine feet high and weigh nearly four hundred pounds. If too little of the hormone is produced the growth may be correspondingly stunted. YOUR MANNERS You know that you are much more efficient than many of your friends. WRONG: Point out better ways of doing things, whenever you are tempted to by their lack of efficiency. RIGHT: Remember that it is fine to be efficient if you don't try to boss other people around or continually offer unasked for advice. Today In WASHINGTON SENATE: Continues debate on bill carrying funds for the Labor Department and the Federal Security Agency for the next fiscal year (10 a. m.). Armed Services and Foreign Relations Committees hear former Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson testify on ouster of Gen. Douglas MacArthur and related foreign policies (8 a. m.) HOUSE: Considers routine legislation (10 a. m.) Ways and Means Committee makes final inspection of new tax bill (S a. m.) Banking Committee continues consideration of bill to extend the Defense Production Act (8 a. m.) WHITE HOUSE: President T r u m i n foregoes weekly news conference, speaks to nation on economic controls (8:30 p. m.). TIME TO BUY LIQUOR rs NOW from the only Liquor Store in Mt. Vernon. East Side Square - FREE DEUVERY. PHONE 100 or 708 Free ParliInK in Rear SEAFORTH*S SOLID AFTER-SHAVE LOTION GroomStick 1 Now . . . give your face a zing! a zip! a lift! with GroomStick, Seaforth's iif w solid after-shave lotion. Brisk and hearty with Seaforth'a come-on aroma of Heather 'n Fern cooling, Mothing, antiseptic. For a brand-new, grand-new after -shave 8en»ation. buv GroomStick today! •DUGrAS @ pRUC COMPANY , HIT. VER^OM Driwe -ln Theatre Last Times Tonite DENNIS MORGAN — BETSY DRAKE "PRETTY BABY" Friday and Satfirday -^JOHNNY SHEFFIELD ^DONALD WOODS THE LOST VOLCANO^ PLUS Hi ^ ROY ROGERS ^ SHINE ON HARVEST MOON Saturday Night Only It Hli 'Vnisfht Siiow FREE TO THOSE ATTENDING EARLY SHOW 'Jiggs and Maggie Out West' 1 • Kotn's f resn Homogenized MILK qt .ZU • Old Fasliioned Carton Cottage Cheese ..21c Choice Golden Ripe OOC Bonanas . 2ibs .Z7 ICS SOUTH ISTH STREET — iPHONE 808 809 Old Fasliioned Carton Cottage Cheese ..21c Choice Golden Ripe OOC Bonanas . 2ibs .Z7 J Borden's Fresh Home Mode COC Ham Salad . ib 3 # Cheese Salad — Potato Salad SILVER DUST SOAP POWDER 3 large boxes 98c Wosh Cloths Free Old Fasliioned Carton Cottage Cheese ..21c Choice Golden Ripe OOC Bonanas . 2ibs .Z7 J Borden's Fresh Home Mode COC Ham Salad . ib 3 # Cheese Salad — Potato Salad SILVER DUST SOAP POWDER 3 large boxes 98c Wosh Cloths Free Garden Fresh Green Onioni Radishes . . . bch 3 U. S. Govt. Inspected Lean Center Cut iJT^ Pork Chops . ib. 03 Loin End Roast ib. 53c Swift's No. 1 Grade Loyer Sliced flOC Bacon 2ibs. # # SILVER DUST SOAP POWDER 3 large boxes 98c Wosh Cloths Free Garden Fresh Green Onioni Radishes . . . bch 3 U. S. Govt. Inspected Lean Center Cut iJT^ Pork Chops . ib. 03 Loin End Roast ib. 53c Swift's No. 1 Grade Loyer Sliced flOC Bacon 2ibs. # # Sweetheart Toilet Soap 00^ 4 bars £,j Garden Fresh Green Onioni Radishes . . . bch 3 U. S. Govt. Inspected Lean Center Cut iJT^ Pork Chops . ib. 03 Loin End Roast ib. 53c Swift's No. 1 Grade Loyer Sliced flOC Bacon 2ibs. # # Sweetheart Toilet Soap 00^ 4 bars £,j Garden Fresh Firm Ripe OCC Tomatoes 2 ibs. J3 Garden Fresh 0^ Green Corn £ Cucumbers 4 r ^ Green Peppers 13 U. S. Govt. Inspected Lean Center Cut iJT^ Pork Chops . ib. 03 Loin End Roast ib. 53c Swift's No. 1 Grade Loyer Sliced flOC Bacon 2ibs. # # Paclced by Maxwell House Bliss 7Q( Coffee lb 70 While Stocks Last Garden Fresh Firm Ripe OCC Tomatoes 2 ibs. J3 Garden Fresh 0^ Green Corn £ Cucumbers 4 r ^ Green Peppers 13 Swift's Gold Crest American Cheese 2 Ib. box 79c Borden's Chateau 2 Ib. box 98c Paclced by Maxwell House Bliss 7Q( Coffee lb 70 While Stocks Last Garden Fresh Firm Ripe OCC Tomatoes 2 ibs. J3 Garden Fresh 0^ Green Corn £ Cucumbers 4 r ^ Green Peppers 13 Swift's Gold Crest American Cheese 2 Ib. box 79c Borden's Chateau 2 Ib. box 98c Drip—Bejf.—Pulv. Dining Cor OOC Coffee lb 00 Save Coupons Garden Fresh Firm Ripe OCC Tomatoes 2 ibs. J3 Garden Fresh 0^ Green Corn £ Cucumbers 4 r ^ Green Peppers 13 Swift's Gold Crest American Cheese 2 Ib. box 79c Borden's Chateau 2 Ib. box 98c Drip—Bejf.—Pulv. Dining Cor OOC Coffee lb 00 Save Coupons Choice Poscol 4 Celery, Ige Stalk 13 Choice Fresh Dressed Tender Grown Fryers ib. 3 # 2 to 2V2 lbs. D.I Mont. 00 Peaches . 3 r.' I Packed In Heavy Syrup Choice Poscol 4 Celery, Ige Stalk 13 Choice Fresh Dressed Tender Grown Fryers ib. 3 # 2 to 2V2 lbs. D.I Mont. 00 Peaches . 3 r.' I Packed In Heavy Syrup Choice Fresh 360 Sunkist Lemons . . doz .u3 Choice Fresh Dressed Tender Grown Fryers ib. 3 # 2 to 2V2 lbs. Burnette Farms R«d Pitted ylO$ Cherries 2^ *tO Choice Fresh 360 Sunkist Lemons . . doz .u3 Swift's Premium ceilo pkg. Skinless r"T^ Wieners ... ib .3l Burnette Farms R«d Pitted ylO$ Cherries 2^ *tO PEACHES — CHERRIES WATERMELONS CANTELOUPES—ORANGES PINEAPPLE — APPLES LETTUCE—CAULIFLOWER ETC. Swift's Premium ceilo pkg. Skinless r"T^ Wieners ... ib .3l Indiana Fancy Hand Packed Vlt Tomatoes 2^:£6l PEACHES — CHERRIES WATERMELONS CANTELOUPES—ORANGES PINEAPPLE — APPLES LETTUCE—CAULIFLOWER ETC. Choice Ui€ Beef Ground . lb. Ow (Pure All Meat) Indiana Fancy Hand Packed Vlt Tomatoes 2^:£6l PEACHES — CHERRIES WATERMELONS CANTELOUPES—ORANGES PINEAPPLE — APPLES LETTUCE—CAULIFLOWER ETC. Choice Ui€ Beef Ground . lb. Ow (Pure All Meat) Indiana Fancy Hand Packed Vlt Tomatoes 2^:£6l FRESH CRISP POST TOASTIES lLge.box..''2l'i^' 1 Reg. box .. ^^0 Choice Ui€ Beef Ground . lb. Ow (Pure All Meat) Value Brand Choice Cut Green ^4 ^ Beans .. 2 ^"„^ J1 FRESH CRISP POST TOASTIES lLge.box..''2l'i^' 1 Reg. box .. ^^0 Swift's—Rath'9—Hunters' Ready to Eat £ Hams Haw""*.. Lb, Ow Value Brand Choice Cut Green ^4 ^ Beans .. 2 ^"„^ J1 FRESH CRISP POST TOASTIES lLge.box..''2l'i^' 1 Reg. box .. ^^0 Swift's—Rath'9—Hunters' Ready to Eat £ Hams Haw""*.. Lb, Ow Schultze Oven Fresh Crackers i^'^.. £.1 Campbells Pork & Boons OOC 2 Mb. cans ..Z7 Fresh Pure Poric, Leon Choice 00^ Sausage — ib .07 Schultze Oven Fresh Crackers i^'^.. £.1 Campbells Pork & Boons OOC 2 Mb. cans ..Z7 Fresh Pure Poric, Leon Choice 00^ Sausage — ib .07 Graham Crackers 1 e^i 29* American Beauty RED BEANS ^ No.2 ^Ac PORK & BEANS ^ cans ^7 SWIFT'S BRANDED TENDER JUICY BEEF and VEAl All Cuts Graham Crackers 1 e^i 29* American Beauty RED BEANS ^ No.2 ^Ac PORK & BEANS ^ cans ^7 SWIFT'S BRANDED TENDER JUICY BEEF and VEAl All Cuts Orange Jb Lemon pkgr. Sherbet Cookies .24c Linco (1 "V^ Bleach . qt. btl. | / All Flavors Jello..3pkgs .ZO Chormin Toilet Tissue. .4 Rou. w # Ponds Fociol Tissue..4 !i ;;«7V

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