The Daily News from Huntingdon, Pennsylvania on April 28, 1948 · Page 7
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The Daily News from Huntingdon, Pennsylvania · Page 7

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Wednesday, April 28, 1948
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.<-V A, THI DAILY NIWS, HUNTIH«DON AN* MOUNT UNION, PA.. WIDNISDAY, AFRfl 28, l»4t. PAQI SEVIR CLAPPER IS VICTOR (Continued from First Page) • Ing for a post on the State Republican Committee from the 36th District. • It looked as if Wood would be the winner by a narrow margin. Although he carried the other Broad Top districts and was likely to carry the missing precinct from that section, he lost ' East Providence Township 2 to 1 .and would probably lose in the West Providence section. Write-ins for Republican choice for president showed the following: (figures include all 42 precincts): Dowey, 813; Stassen, 365; Martin, 298; MacArthur, 111; Taft, 105; Vandenberg, 43; Eisenhower, 21; Warren, 20; Wallace, 4. On the Democratic ballot, there were no contests. The write-ins ifor presidential popular vote showed: Truman, 706; Eisenhower, IS; Wallace, 7. A number of contests were waged for members to the two county committees. Broad Top area districts showed the • following vote: . • Broad Top No. 1: Republican— 'Arthur Rankin, 120; Reuben Thomas, 61. Democratic — James iV. Weaver, 90; Reginald Lundquist, 50. Broad Top No. 2. (Not yet heard from). Broad Top No. 3. Republican— Roy W. Troutman. Democratic— not counted, Hopewell Boro. Republican — Mearl Warsing, 42; Howard Young, 25. Democratic — Elizabeth W. Porter, 23. Hopewell Township. Republican —'Robert Roher, 63; William H. Ritchey, 29. Democratic—Charles A. Mcllnay, 15. Liberty Township. Republican .—Russell Palmer, 78, Democratic —Glenn Treece, 31. ' Saxton Boro. Republican ;— Frank E. Steele, 161; Ralph E. Moyle, 94. Democratic, B. T. Weaver, 28. Winners In Assembly Race Philadelphia, April 28.—The following were nominated without opposition as candidates for the State Assembly: (x)—denotes incumbent. Bedford (1)—Dem. John H. Moorehead, Bedford. Blair: First District '(1)—Dr. John E. Reading, Altoona. Second (2)—Dems. Maurice G. De 1 Lahcey, Altooria, and Harry R. Beem, Jr., Hollidaysburg'. Centre . (1)—(x)—Rep. Preston A. Frost. State College; Dem. George Narehood, Pine Glen. Ciearfield: First District (l)— Rep. William I. Swoope, Madera; Dem. Harris G. Breth, Glearfield. Second (1)—Dem. William A. Mark, DuBois. ' Fulton (1)—(x)—Rep. Harvey H. Clevenger, McConnellsburg; Dem. Lewis Harris, McConnella- burg. Huntingdon (1)—(x)—Rep. Josept H. Neff, Alexandria. Juniata (1)—(x)—Rep. Harry J. Graybill, Thompsontown. Mifflin (1)—(x)—Rep. Harry W, Price, Jr., Lewistown; Dem. Lowell H. Alexander, Belleville. JEWS, DRIVING AT COSTAL an OF JAFFA; ARABS FLEE BY MEO TURNBR . United Press Correspondent . Jerusalem, April 28.—Strengthened Jewish forces drove at the i»ig Arab coastal city .of Jaffa today, and the Arab population wa* seeking to escape by sea. . ' ' Simultaneously, the ' *WifUy- evacuating British pulled all except about 20 government employes out of Jerusalem, where the last British controls were loosening swiftly. There was'.a report that British evacuation of the holy city would be completed by May 5. • .' ' ' The bitter Jaffa fighting turned against the Arab defenders of the city of about 70,000 when Haganah Jewish militia joined Ir'gun Zv&i Leiimi attackers in thrusts against the city. ; The Haganah thrust from the South brought the Arab forces in Jaffa—which included a battalion of the Arab legion of King Abdullah , of Trans-Jordan—under, attack from three sides. Their backs wei\e to the sea. Panic-stricken Arab citizens were reported rushing to Egyptian and Lebanese schooners and sailing vessels in the harbor to leave the fighting area. The business and • residential quarters of Jaffa were pounded all night by Irgun Zvai Leumi mortar shells after the Irgunists captured Arab strong-points in. the Men- shiya quarter in the northern district of the. city. Irgunists also held the Salame Road and Abu Kebir, on Jaffa's southeast corner, and were pushing hard from there, apparently seeking to squeeze out Arab positions in the no man's land be- ; tween Jaffa, and the all-Jewish city of Tel Aviv to the north. That would make possible a junction with Irgunists in- the Menshiya area. At 3 a. m: Haganah troops were thrown into the fighting. They attacked from due south of Jaffa, and were reported making progress against strong Arab resistance. The Arab legionnaires ' appeared to be the backbone of Arab defense. Haganah also strengthened emplacements on the Jerusalem-Jaffa road outside the city. This was the only route along which Arab reinforcements could come. Only yesterday" Haganah had condemned the Irgunist attack on Jaffa, but the decision to join it apparently was reached at an orange grove conference of leaders of the two groups outside Tel Aviv yesterday in which'coordination of forces was agreed upon. The British had threatened to take a hand in fighting against the_ Jews if the attack on Jaffa continued, but this seemed unlikely. It did not appear that the British had strength available for such a purpose. Two sisters in Missouri married two brothers; making them sisters-in-law. Now they can fuss more than ever! FORTY PER CENT OF (Continued from First Page) Democratic votes polled in district follows; : ' . '•" '•'. .. "'• •'• Rep. Alexandria ,...,„.., 8* Barree 43 Birmingham .'. 20 North Brady , 15 South Brady '. 38 Broad Top City.,.., „., 38 Carbon , , 8» Cass 18 Latta'Grove 90 Cassville , 28 Clay 46 Coalmont' 18 CromwellV..,. , 30 North Dublin ..„. 8T South Dublin 20 Dudley 43 Franklin 56 Henderson 19 Ardenheim , 12 Hope'weU 87 Put'tstdwn 18 Huntingdon, 1st wd 254 2nd wd., 1st Prec't 215 2nd wd., 2nd Prec't. ,...227 3rd wd,, 1st Prec't 151 3rd wd., 2nd Prec't 210 Huntingdon, 4th wd. 207 Huntingdon, 5th wd 208 Jackson ". 69 Juniata •,,. 1 .,...,,.., 34 Lincoln .; ':'. 34 Logan 20 Mapleton 52- Marklesburg 93 Mill Creek 51 Miller : 29 Morris 24 Mt. 'Union, 1st wd 167 Mt. Union, 2nd «'d 154 Mt. Union/ 3rd wd 130 Oneida 150 Orbisonia 176 Penn -,. 22 Grantsville 24 Petersburg x ng . North Porter 31 South Porter '88 Rockhill .. 93 SaHillo .-...;.'.'.". 25 Shade Gap 92 Shirley ..'. 49 Hill Valley ..',.'".' 19 Mount Union Dist 84 Valley Point 12 Shirleysburg 29 Smithfield 188 Springfield ;..... 4$ Spruce Creek 51 North Tell . 52 South Tell 15 Three Springs 41 Todd so Union 19' Calvin ,j.. 71 Walker '. .".-. 39 Warriors Mark 94 West '-.".'. 52 Wood „ '..... 70 each Dem. 30 5 4 5 15 25 14 0 2 6 8 15 15 14 6 25 6 1 11 2 . S 16 9 19 ' 13 9 12 28 11 4 5 4 19 1 7 5 4 « 36 29 24 15 36 32 4 28 11 4 IS S 1 14 2 9 S ' 7 30 2 13 20 22 7 4 2 4 13 2 11 30 4960 • 810 With The Sick The many friends of John . B. Hoover, son of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Hoover of 530 . Penn Street, Huntingdon, will be sorry to learn that he was taken to the.J. C. Blair Memorial Hospital yesterday where he is under observation and treatment. John had been ill at his home for several days. HeMo, Gorgeous! Come /n...meef f/ie glamour queen of the motor car world! If Atlantic-City were holding a beauty contest for automobiles this year, there'd be no question about the winner. It's pictured above—the breathtaking new Packard Convertible. And it's beauty that's backed by brawn and brains. Its newly engineered chassis gives this Packard a safety, a rigidity, a glued-to-the- road stability new to this type of car. Its low-slung body is the quietest any Packard convertible ever had. The new engines —whether the 145-h.p. Super or the 160-h.p. Custom — well, you have never known performance that could touch what they give you. And every ultra-smart interior appointment is what you would expect in the finest Packard ever built. But come in, meet this dazzling. darling. From the first glance, there'll be a new love in your life! ASK THE MAN WHO OWHSONE A. L WESTBROOK 517-519 Mifflin St., Huntingdon, Pa., Phone 32 STOCKS STOCKS N ;p4M New York, April' M. — The stock market turned irregular today. Oil scored gain* ranging to more than 3 points in Skelly with Tidewater, Deep Rock, Gulf, Phillips, Pacific Western and Miaaion Corp, all up a point or more each. '_ Railroad, «h area held : up, well despite calling of a strike on. May 11, In thU group Atlantic (Tout Line roae 2 to a new high and Nickel Plate, wa* .. fractionally higher, Santa Fe and C * O were down amall fraetioni, Steels awere iteady. Motors were firmer, . with Chrysler and Studebaker up fractionally, International Harvester, Curtis Publishing and' International Paper all rose fractionally. • N.w York A»ril II. — U •. ». .U<k quotntioni: , . Allli Chalmtri .... ............... ,., .......... ..... jg^4 American C»n ,;.„.,, ..... „„„„.„„ ..... . ...... g| Amtrltan Kid m*i U ...... ......... ......... 1414 Amtrictn T<1 m*i T«l ...„„,;..,. Amiricanv VI*c*M .„...,. ................ ,.,. Anaconda ................... . .......... ,' ( ........... Armour , ................. •'.....,..,.™,., .I..',....!.'.'.. Atlantic Rtfininv H.ltimor* tni Ohi« ..„„.,...] Rtthleh.m SUtl ............................. B«n<iU ATi.ti.ii ......... . Borr W.rn.r ,., ......... , .......... ..."".,.' ,.. Ctlann* .......... . ............................. !.','. ...... 2714 Chtiapiaki tni Ohlt .................... Chryiltr ............................................... , Columbia Rai ........... , ..... ,.,..., ...... . ......... Common w«»llh *ni S«uth«rn ..... ... 2J4 Conwiliil*Ud Ediion ................. . ....... jjijj; Continental Motor* ..... ..... ............. 7*4 Curtlu Writht .............................. .'.".'... 7^, Bupont ...... . ............................................ . 174% Electric Bond and Share .................... H 1 A fl*ne»al Electric ........ ...... ...... .......... . General Foods . ..... -,. ........ ,.,.*, ........ ...... Goodyear ' ........ ........................ ',, .............. 431^ Great - Northern ...... ......... ............ ;. ..... , 4f a^ l!)ino!« Central '..... ................... . ........ ... 13% International Harvester ....... , ............ (4 International Nickel ................... ; ..... if Kennecott ............... i.. ....... f| I.ehiirh Valltj' ................... „.'..."." ........ «»4 Lorillard, ....... ... ................ ...„ ........ ... ...... 19^4 J-oew ............................. ..............„..;..;„. Montgomery Ward ......... ..... ,.„• ......... G. C. Murphy .... ....... ;J. .......... . . ..„. ................... ..... ...... ....,.... ......... Nation*! Rincuit ................. .....!".!.... National Dairy ............ "" National Dfstlllera .„.....'.; ...... N.w York Central T. ............. „""'.".'" North. American ......... Northern Pacific :...". .............. Oti. Kiev. ......................... '*• .............. Packard ................. ...""...... ................ Paramount Picturet '"."!!!!!"""!!" ........ " Penney ............................... .'.'.'.' .......... '•" Penn Jtailro«d _ .......... ' ""~ 27'/4 i ~ . ...... _... Pullman ................ ...... Radio ....... ............. ;;;;;;; Remington Rand _!Z,' Republic Steel .... ........ ." Seara Roebuck ....... Sinclair Oil ........... "", ........... .. Southern Railway ,_ ..................... Standard Br.nd» ' .............. " ...... " .. Standard Oil (NJ) .." ""' ................. St.w.rt Warner .. ............................. ' Studebak.r , ....................... ' .......... Texai ..... " ............... ...... ....... — Texai Co. ... United Aircraft V. S, SU.I . s. JJJ* '»'V4 "Vi (Continued from First Page) of tha top Republican Pennsylvania and the state'* big 73-member,GOP delegation selected will ff 0 unpledged to the national convention in June. " The Pennsylvania' Republican wnte-m in 1944 accurately predicted the nomination of Dewey He polled 146,706 wrie-in votes' compared to 1,502 for Stassen and 9,032 for Gen. Douglas MacArthur. The nation eyed the preference balloting because its results may strongly influence the voting of the Republican bloc at the national convention. The delegation, second only to x New York in voting strength, wa* committed unofficially to east at least it« firat ballot for Sen. Martin. However, if this boom collapse* the delegation may swing- its votes to the winner of today'* popularity poll. The Republican* elected 66 district and seven delegates-at-large for their national convention. The Democrats named 82. unpledged delegates, with a voting strength of 74, for their nominating parley. Both major partie* also nominated candidates for the state'* entire 33 congressional seats, elected state committee* and nominated 208 State House and 25 State Senate members. Party .candidates for the two state fiscal office* had no primary opposition. In the. top state legislative fight, Republican .State Chairman M. Harvey Taylor, of Harrisburg, won his sharp Dauphin County fight for renomioatlon to his State Senate seat. Almoat oompl«t« return* gave him an approximate 1,400 vote edge over hi* former political associate, Walter M. Mumma, Harri*burg businessman, in a turnout of approximately 70 per cent of registered Republicans. Taylor, who had the full support of Gov. Jame* H. Duff in the bitter county campaign, wa* unopposed for election a* a delegate : at-large. Chief Justice George W. Maxey, of the State Supreme Court, wa« victorious in a noisy contest for the two district convention delegate posts in'' the 10th Congressional District, Laokawanna County, • Maxey wa* opposed by a faction headed by former President Judge Will Leach of Lackawanna County Court/, who^ contended that an American Bar, Association canon prohibited Maxey'* bid for a party position. During tne pre-primary campaign both 1 Maxey and Leach exchanged *harp ^ pemonal 'criticism*. " The opposing faction, however, aucceeded in naming their, candidate, Esdra*'F. Howell, youiig Scranton attorney, a* the second district delegate, defeating Maxey'* running mate, Worthington Scranton, husband of the GOP national committeewoman. Republicans nominated State Sen. Weldon B. Heyburn <** Delaware County for auditor general and State Welfare ' Secretary Charlie R. Barber of ftrU for atatc treasurer. Democrats named State Treasurer Ramsey S. Black of Harrisburg for auditor general and State Sen. William J. Lane, .of, Washington County, lor > state txe**ur«c. * OBITUARY George M. George MoClellan Kelly of NorUiwood, Tyrone, a retired paper mill employe, died at «:30 o'clock Tuesday morning, April 27, 1948, at the home of hi* daughter, Mrs, M, B, Albright, of 'North* wood, He was M years of ag«. He .wa* born at Hill' Valley, Huntingdon County, .Sept. 1, 1861, the »on of ThoinM and Mary Kelly, He married Elizabeth iLatherow .in 1889 at Shirleysburg. She died in Feb. 1&32. Surviving are the following children; Arthur J. and Mrs, Albright of Northwood; and Mrs, iR, W, Cupper of Tyrone. He also leaves a sister, Mrs. Florence Humbarger of Sheffield; nine grandchildren and jjine great- grandchildren. .He was a member of the First Evangelical United Brethren Church of Tyrone and had been a resident of the locality for the past 50 years. Funeral; services will be held at the. Graham and Getz funeral home in Tyrone. .Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock in charge of R ev . Budd R. Smith. Interment 'will be made in the Germany • Vallev cemetery, SWnleysburg. Friends may call at the funeral home after 7. o'clock Wednesday evening. ••ftt George Wudyka George A. Wudyka of Six Mile Run R. D. died in the J. C. Blair Memorial Hospital on Mondav April 26, 1948. . . '. • He was born in Bochma, Poland; on April.; 18, 1874, a son of Mr and Mrs. George Wudyka. He was united in marriage to Nellie Kazzmarek on June 16. 1908 in Dudley. .Mrs. Wudyka and these sons are surviving: Francis Wudyka of Detroit, Michigan, Walter, Felix and John Wudyka, all of Poland. The funeral service will be held at 10 a. m. on Thursday in the Dudley Catholic Church. The Rev. Father Bernard Conley will officiate and burial will be made in the Catholic Cemetery at Dudley Friends may call at Huff* funeral chapel at Saxton. Westinghouse Cuts Price On Airport Lights Cleveland, April 28.— Westinir- house Electric Corp. today announced price reductions of 5 to 10 per cent on airport lighting facilities. W F. White, manager of the lighting division here, said prices would be reduced on some 90 types of lighting units, effective at once. Among the items reduced are rotating airport beacons, flashing signal beacons, 24 types of. strip and, runway marker lights, wind cones, ceiling projector lights, landing field floodlights, angle of approach indicator, and runway designators. White said the price reductions were made possible through' savings due Fo improved production and greater volume. He said it it the company's hop* that the lower prices will stimulate even greater activity in airport improvement and construction. White said the production of airport lighting facilities will reach an all-tim« high this year, 2100FeetOf- Concrete Laid On By-Pass I>espite the rain *'hlch fell throughout the working day on Tuesday, paving operations reached a new high on the by-pass road project east of Huntingdon borough. Week-end rains halted work on Monday, but the operations continued full-speed ahead yesterday. Officials of the J. C. Langenfelder and Company, Inc. reported to The Daily News that 2100. feet of concrete was laid. The previous daily high was 1,390 feet. Work was stopped on the by-pass today because of the ateady rain and officials stated they could- not say when, operations would start again. BUS, CAR DAMAGED JN MINOR COLLISION 3 GOP CANDIDATES LOSE FOR CONGRESS Philadelphia, .April 28.—Three Republican Congressmen were defeated ; at yesterday's state primary election as they sought re- nomination for new terms in the U, S. House of Representatives, They .were: First District, James, Gallagher,. Philadelphia; 7th District, E. Wallace Chadwick, .Delaware County; and 10th District, James P. ScobHck, Lackawanna County. • Eight other .Congressmen came out.-, successfully in primary eon- teats,' while r M21 others were re- nominated without opposition. The following 'were nominated in contested districts: 21st: (Adams, York, Franklin) —Dem, Guy A. Leader, York. The following we/e nominated without opposition as . candidates for Congress from Pennsylvania; 22nd (Ciearfield, Centre and Blair)—(x) Rep. James BJ. Van Zandt, Altoona; Dem.'Julia Luigia 17th (Fulton, Huntingdon, Juni. ata, Mifflin, Perry, Snyder: Bedford and Union)—(x), Rep. Rich-, ard M. Simpson, Huntingdon. (x) Denotes incumbent. Tom Breneman, Famous Radio Star, Drops Dead / - Encjno, Cal., April 28.—Tom Breneman, 46, master of cere-' monies of radio's "Breakfast in Hollywood," dropped 'dead today at hig home an hour before-hls.daily program was to go on the air. A heart attacK is beUeved to have caused his death. Treasury Report Washington, April 28.—Government expenses and receipts for the current fiscal year through April 26: expenses, $28,935,924,843.74; receipts, 36,427,478,256.95; surplus, 7,481,553,413.21; -cash balance, 4,404,274,573.24; public debt', 252,262,553,214.76; gold reserve, 23,167,248,817.82. Alroonan On Probation Altoona 10 pt u dd i-7 Pittsburgh, April 28.—Donald McGravv, Altoona, was put on probation yesterday after he pleaded guilty before Federal Judge R. M. Gibson to charges of stealing a state check for $12 from the mails. Tom 'Breneman \va* a native of the neighboring county of Franklin, having been born In Waynes- bbro June 18, 1902. Although many thought of him as an Irishman, he was actually . of Pennsylvania "Dutch" descent, hi* re*l name beinjf'Tom Breneman Smith, one of six children of a Waynesboro sand mine operator. He was graduatod from the Waynesboro public schools, At last year's oesqui- centennial In that town, he returned and conducted the famed "breakfast club" in tWe Waynes- horo High School auditorium. He was ah old "boyhood" friend of Prof. i.Ts. Oiler, JunJata College. More than 600 persons crowded outside his restaurant in Hollywood, waiting for the program and unaware of his death. The program was cancelled, Breneman had appeared in -good health yesterday when he presided at his programs. He recently returned from a month's vacation which had been recommended by his doctor. For seven years, Breneman had served as master of ceremonies on the radio program in which the audience participated. The program featured women, with the eldest woman present being given an orchid and a kiss by Breneman. His radio program was made into a movie a few years ago with Breneman in the leading role. He wandered through the story, "Breakfast in Hollywood," as a mender of broken romances and a general good fellow. Just six month ago, he moved into a-new: restaurant in Hollywood,) 'Breneman lived on a two-acre estate here, and was mayor of Enclho, film star-studded com- n-mnity, at the time of his death. Breneman .was married to the former Billie Dunn, one-time radio actress. He had two children -^Gloria Anne, 19, and Tom,. Jr., ' Breneman first went on the air in 1B27. In 1929 he created .th« "Tom 'n Wash" skit. He went to New York in;lWl-3* to conduct the how, deiiinct "Laugh Club" on the air, Later h« returned to the West Coast. His "Breakfast" program started Jan. 13, 1941, rlrsf. being called "Breakfast at Sardi's" from the name of the restaurant where it originated. In the Springxgf 1945, Breneman acquired his own eatery and the program was transferred to hia restaurant with the name changed to "Breakfast in Hollywood." The radio star attended Columbia University in New York. FIRE DAMAGES REA & DERiCK STORE Fire, which started around ,a transformer for the fluorescent lighting in the store, caused considerable damage to the Rea & Derick_ Drug Store on S. Allen Street,' State College, Tuesday morning. The fire, which burned In the partition between the ceiling of the store and the offices and apartments above, was discovered shortly before 10 a. m. by clerks and customers when flames broke out in the' ceiling above the prescription counter. Firemen tore down a large area of the ceiling above this' counter to fight the flames which were spreading- rapidly and which were causing much smoke. It was necessary for firemen to use gas masks to enter the store and also the apartments and offices atfove. A Fourth Street Transit bus and a car were damaged in a collision at 7:15 a. m. today, but no one was injured. • / . . The bus, operated by Richard Winstead, had stopped at Seventh and Washington Streets to discharge a passenger. Ralph Berke, of 513 Sixteenth Street, driving on Washington Street, was attempting to pass the bus whence claimed a pedestrian darted iri front of him. To avoid the pedestrian, Berke told the operator of the bus, he swerved, and crashed into the bus.' . ' '• '''•;.''' The right front fender and door of the Berke car were damaged, and the left front end and bumper of the bus were damaged. ATTEND FUNERAL AT GETTYSBURG Mr. and'Mra.'Vogel Ge.ttier of .Huntingdon are in Gettysburg today attending the funeral of Mrs. A, F. Thomari of R. D. 3, Gettysburg. . . . Mrs. Thomiui, the former Miss Ma* G«ttier, i* a cousin of Vogel Gettier, manager of the Clifton Theatre. She died Saturday, April 24, 1948. Funeral services were .held, this afternoon for Mrs. Thoman at a Gettysburg funeral home and interment was made at Bifflerville, • • MODERN MARVELS TO MAKE HOME MORE DELIGHTFUL! Complete Line of Famous Manufacturers! The year's moat outstanding models and biggest buys in'home appliances of every description are here for your selection on our floors . . . ready for immediate deliyeryl Let our salesman show you the newest innovations, demonstrate latest improvements at no obligation ,to you. you'll enjoy seeing the lateat household .wonder-workers on our floor! * Radio* * Ironer* * Gas Range* * Vacuum Cleaners * Electric Roaster* * Electric Irons * Electric Toaster* * Refrigerators * Electric Washers * Automatic Laundries * Portable Washers * Open An Account DOZENS OF NATIONALLY FAMOUS BRANDS FEATURING HOTPOINT ELECTRIC RANGES $169 •" - i IHAPIROI MOUNT U

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