The Indianapolis Star from Indianapolis, Indiana on May 25, 1985 · Page 52
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The Indianapolis Star from Indianapolis, Indiana · Page 52

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Indianapolis, Indiana
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Saturday, May 25, 1985
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Page 52
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PACE 52 THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR SATURDAY, MAY 25, 1385 Witnesses can't give whereabouts of slaying suspect By MARY BETH BAUKA STAR STAFF WRITER The defense of murder suspect Charles E. Raines got off to a shaky start Friday, when three alibi witnesses could not fully account for his whereabouts the evening two Indianapolis men are believed to have been shotgunned to death. Raines, 30. is charged with two counts of murder, two counts of felony murder murder occurring during a robbery and three counts of theft in the slayings of Phillip R Fentress II 21 and Kevin D. Vinson. 24. . Vinson and Fentress were found murdered Aug. 24 at their home at 2106 South Sherman Drive. West. Deputy coroners Charles W. Green and Harry Lovell testified Friday that they believe the murders occurred at 9 p.m. Aug. 22, although Green said the time of death is "very much of a guess" and could have occurred as much as six hours earlier or later. '., The defense is attempting to prove Raines was at a rock concert at the time of the slayings. However, both Bruce T. and Roberta Sparks, who went to the Aug. 22 Jefferson Starship concert at the Indiana State Fair with Raines and his girlfriend, Julia A. Probasco, said they had trouble locating Raines when it was time to leave for the concert, that Raines seemed upset and wouldn't talk to them, 3nd that he disappeared during the concert for an hour to an hour and half. Ms. Probasco also testifed V i0hi ix I P si frl I . v fe?., Indianapolis 1 j V USpw,H . A .ssisffl 1J - fyj N If - TSSy&wAY t jv V Suggested routes to Indianapolis Motor Speedway for Sunday's race. Police suggest routes for travel to 4500' Police suggest using the following routes to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway for Sunday's 500-Mile Race: '-. Drivers may use West 16th Street, where they'll be routed through Gate 2, or West 30th Street, which leads to Gate 10 or off-street parking. Travelers on 1 65 should take the 30th Street exit (No. 115), then go west to Gate 10. Or they may use the Northwestern Avenue exit (No. 116) and take Northwestern Avenue to 30th Street and then west to Gate 10, or Northwestern south to 16th Street and then west to Gate 2. - Those who use the 21st Street exit (No. 114) should take 21st Street west to Northwestern Avenue, then go south to 16th Street and then west to Gate 2. From the Lafayette Road exit (No. 121), go south to Georgetown Road, then south to the Coca-Cola Bottling Co. plant on 25th Street. ; Drivers from 1 465 are asked to use one of three exits: 10th Street (No. 14A) east to Lynhurst Drive, Police take everything in massage parlor raid '' A far-Westside massage parlor lost its inventory Friday when Marion County sheriffs deputies enforced a court injunction Capt. Elbert Elder said it took two hours to load the contents of the White House Adult Center. 6655 West Washington Street, into a moving van. v Beds, filing cabinets, chairs, tamps and coffee pots will be sold later at a public auction. Because of continuing prostitution arrests at the center since 1982. the city filed an "indecent nuisance" action against the business in February. V Gary W. Bippus, assistant corpo rale counsel in the city's legal divi Raines left during the concert to complain about the seating arrangements but said it was only for about 45 minutes, and she denied that he acted peculiarly that evening. Mrs. Sparks said Ms. Probasco could not at first locate Raines before the concert and said Ms. Probasco told her that Raines had gone to "Phil and Kevin's" to get cocaine. The prosecution is attempting to prove Raines shot Vinson and Fentress to death because he wanted the cocaine he believed they had recently obtained. When they did pick up Raines about 7:30 p.m., Mrs. Sparks said, he had just showered and was "not himself." She added, "He wouldn't even say hi to my husband and me. He was pretty upset." They were about 15 minutes late to the 8 p.m. concert Raines apparently became upset because people were standing, making their reserved seats useless, Mrs. Sparks said. He left to try and get his money back and they did not see him again until after the concert, she said. Ms. Probasco said the Sparkses were lying about Raines being upset and denied saying that Raines had tried to get cocaine from the victims. She testified the car had not been moved from where she parked it The Sparkses also said it did not appear to have been moved. The trial is expected to conclude Tuesday in Marion Superior Court, Criminal Division, Room 5. STAR ILLUSTRATION then to off-street parking or merge with traffic on U.S. 136; U.S. 136 exit (No. 16A), where vehicles will be routed in three directions to the track; or 38th Street exit (No. 17) east to Moller Road, then south to 30th Street, parking in the Coca-Cola lot. Metro buses will begin leaving downtown at 4:45 a.m. Sunday and depart once a bus is full. Loading points will be at Union Station, at Illinois and Market streets, and on Illinois between Washington and Maryland streets. Tickets, which cost $5 one way and $9 for a roundtrip, must be bought at ticket booths before boarding. Racegoers will be dropped off at 16th and Main streets and picked up there after the race. Shuttle service from Indianapolis International Airport begins at 5 a.m. Sunday at the lower level of the main terminal or the airport parking lot on the east side of South High School Road. Prices are the same as from downtown. sion, said an injunction to "cease and abate" business was issued May 15 in Boone Circuit Court, Lebanon, to which the case had been shifted on a change of venue. Bippus said Judge Ronald E. Drury ordered the center to close for a year and to remove all personal property and contents Capt. Elder said the center has been under surveillance for the past week. "They have remained open for business. That's a flagrant violation of the court order." he said. Undercover deputies will continue to monitor activity at the center for continued compliance, he said. D O O N E S n u R Y VEIL, Alt AT OAST CDMivut&jTHHt utmif&a 1 s-- V UAftGUVZ Clarity in Latin is a dead language, and it should be given a decent burial despite some physicians' fondness for Latin abbreviations on their prescription pads. Some weeks ago. we described medication errors caused by ambiguous abbreviations in prescriptions. In one case, a doctor wrote a prescription in which the abbreviation O.J., for orange juice, was misinterpreted as O.D., meaning right eye. In the column, we suggested that patients should make sure they can read the prescriptions their doctors give them, so they will not have to be the victims of unwitting mistakes. Evidently this advice did not sit well with certain physicians. One irate ophthalmologist. Dr. Hans R Wilbrandt, was critical of us in his letter Joyce Jillson's Horoscope This calunM It far tfittrtihHMat anly. Venus sextiles Mars: excellent for the romantic side of male-female relationships. Go where the social action is; no one has to be left out in the cold. Send flowers, write love notes and trust your sex appeal. Be a joiner. Money is spent freely on pleasure. Artists reach new heights of self expression. ARIES (March 21 April 19). Fight off the slight feelings of emotional discomfort; this lifts in the afternoon. Call up a friend to get that needed advice. The loss of a family member will heal in time. TAURUS (April 20 May 20). Being away from work is like being let out of jail. That easy chair looks inviting, but why not get out instead? Children make large demands of your time; indulge them if possible. GEMINI (May 21 June 21). Try a form of visualization or meditation to get your thoughts together. Spend more time on yourself and sort out your feelings. Be direct, but not blunt in any argument. CANCER (June 22 July 22). An emotional load lifts as if by magic. Forget about getting even with an enemy; you'll be the one to suffer the most. No backsliding in taking care of weekend chores. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Show others how they can help themselves, instead of letting them sap your energy. Build better trust in an existing relationship. Take positive steps to get out of debt. TODAY'S BIRTHDAY (May 25) Untapped ambitions are released and you succeed in dynamic fashion. Good communication paves the road of opportunity in July. Marry for love not money in August a Sagittarian or Aries. The fall takes you to the top of your field. Success in publishing, teaching and aviation in October. Luckiest months are' Council Continued from Page 51 tely accommodate so many projects at once, SerVaas said. In the end, the council last Monday approved $124 million worth of construction financing for 2,600 units. When industrial revenue bonds are used for apartments, 20 percent Balloons Continued from Page 51 cred switching to black and white balloons to resemble the checkered flag at the end of the race, "but the colors are nice." The intricate planning that accompanies each opening ceremony extravaganza hasn't always worked as well as O'Neal would have liked. Though he didn't recall the exact year, it was at the end of the Vietnam War when officials decided to gather as many "doves of peace" as they could find to be released along with the balloons. Every spare pigeon and dove in the Midwest was rounded up for the event, he said. But someone slipped into the infield the night before the race and opened the cages. While the birds generally won't fly at night he said, they took off at the first sign of daybreak. "All we had to show for our effort was a bunch of empty cages and . . . feathers all over the place," he said. "We decided after that we'd just stick with balloons." While O'Neal acknowledges a r coueama KJSSAUCE V eih.t. Bor.im tax MDUW. I ' aT prescription-writing The PEOPLE'S Pharmacy By JOE CRAEDON "It is true that students of medicine usually learn Latin, Greek or both before they enter medical school because this is part of humanistic, broad-based education. I see nothing funny about that Your example of OJ' for orange juice is farfetched and ludicrous." Dr. Wilbrandt goes on to ask us if we are "trying to help or to confuse little old ladies who still have confidence in their physicians? Are you striving for fame and recognition or do you merely get relief June, November and January. Travel now or in December. Improved living arrangements in February. Part-time pursuits blossom into full-time professions. VIRGO (Aug. 23 Sept. 22). Plan on being the center of attention in any gathering. Be conscientious about your grooming and appearance. Delegate responsibilities to others when it's possible. LIBRA (Sept. 23 Oct. 23). Be consistent in behavior when around children. Thinking big brings results. Find time to relax in the evening. Join in with others in the spirit of cooperation and sharing. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Your partner's financial problems come to an end. Find a positive escape rather than to over-indulge in drugs and alcohol. Be able to say no to a risky business venture. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 Dec. 21). See through a false promise made by a person of dubious intent. Positive feelings about a prospective lover prove to be correct. Others offer you their time and energy. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 Jan. 19). Your idealistic beliefs may be treated cavalierly by a close friend. Let your dream experiences guide you in real life. The self-confidence factor outweighs your fears. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 Feb. 18). Take a calculated risk on a new business project. Let non productive relationships go and be open to meeting other people. Weather an emotional storm and wait for the calm to return. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Positive initiative saves the day; don't wait for someone else. Be subtlety aggressive in a business setting. A startling event leads to a personal transformation. TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES of the units must be set aside for low- or moderate-income families. The maximum monthly rent that can be charged for those units in Marion County is $593, Crawford said. Developers plan to charge less than that amount to attract enough renters to qualify for the units, he said. large amount of work goes into the race-starting pageantry, he's just as proud of other planning he's done for this year's race the provision of a large block of parking spaces for the handicapped. The special paved lot between the Speedway Museum and the suites near the second turn will hold about 600 vehicles and is "the best (parking) at the Speedway," he said. While handicapped people can use any of the more than 30,000 parking spaces within the track, the free parking in the paved lot provides better access to the gift shop, vending stands and restrooms, he said. The track always has provided special parking for the handicapped, O'Neal said, "but not in this concentration." He said he has gotten many telephone calls, ranging from people in wheelchairs to people with bad hearts to elderly people who cannot walk very far. "Our interpretation of 'handicapped' is going to be pretty liberal," he said. i HEY.TBi&f lOUNTHtS 'coutse. usee. UHAT JAM,6lKL ftSSTIN' I MAHVO&- from venting hot air?" No. Dr. Wilbrandt, we are not trying to confuse little old ladies or anyone else, for that matter. You may think the orange juice example was farfetched and ludicrous, but we assure you it really happened. The doctor had prescribed Lu-gol's solution, a medication to protect the thyroid gland, to be taken with orange juice. His handwritten prescription read: "Lugol's sol'n gtts. x in O.J. q.i.d. x lOd." The following morning, the doctor asked his patient how he was doing. The patient replied: "pretty good. Doc except for those eye drops you're giving me. They really hurt" After a little checking it was discovered the doctor intended "the abbreviation O.J. to be understood as orange juice. Unfortunately, the handwriting was not clear and O.D. or right eye was transcribed onto the medication administration record. The patient received doses on two different shifts. Once again, the hazards of abbreviation surface." That comes from the book, "Medication Errors: Causes and Prevention," by Dr. Neil Davis and Michael Cohen. Another example they cite includes the patient who was to be given liquid Maalox. The physician used the abbreviation q.n. to mean "every night." The nurse read this as q.h., or every hour. The poor patient was awakened throughout the night to get unneeded doses of Maalox In another case the doctor or dered "Triaminic syrup 3T p.o. qid. A student nurse interpreted this dosage to be 3T or 3 tablespoonsful. Instead of 5 ml, a pediatric patient received 45 ml of the medication." Such mistakes are not isolated Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. i VOYCE lp 1 n YIZZD I " I L-1L THINGK ' N 1 DARZAH 1 n i 1 n Yesterday's Jumbles; LIMBO BRAWL FUTURE PYTHON Answer: When it comes to a dishwasher, most every husband would rather do this BUY THAN BE Now back In stock. Jumbia Book Noa. 5 poaiaga and nanoung irom Jumow, cjo tins nawspapar, P.O. Boa S31 , Palmyra. H J. 08061. Inckida your nama, address, tip coda and maka chock payaMa to Nawspaparbeoks. There are income limits, based on family size. For example, a family of four is eligible if its income is $23,700 or less. Crawford said the bonds would lose their tax-exempt status if the units were rented to people who did not meet the income criteria. He said he did not know if anyone monitored the owners' records to see if they were complying with the requirement. When you want results... Use Star and News Classified Ads Phone 633-1212 Our Classifieds come through for you. R Y G A R It Y T R U D E A L IUTAK5A SOm.VUOS. BALOH.V.10U WIS IS A OJT&XO& FCJVMG IPO WHAT? is essential events. In various studies it has been determined that hospital medication error rates can range anywhere from 10 to 20 percent The most respected pharmacology text in the world, "Goodman and Gilman's Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics" is unequivocal in its recommendation to physicians: "The directions to the patient should always be written in English. The use of Latin abbreviations . . . serves no useful purpose." The few seconds a doctor may save in abbreviating his instructions are not worth the risk of a serious error. Your best defense against mistakes is to insist on a legible prescription printed out in plain English. Know what when and how you are to take your medicine and leave the Latin to the classics scholars. ' Joe Craedon is a pharmacologist and the author of "The New Peoj pie's Pharmacy J" (Bantam). . . O KNtf Ftitvm Svndiutt HEALTH CAPSULES by Mirhf I A. Pmi. M.D. Unl.) MilfU UnULT CALCfUBt A You set CLPEfZ $Tm3MG AT lQVol 5HOULV STAtzTREDuC-HG YoufZ CALORIES ABOUT 7 PERCEHJ eVRV to yCAR'Z.oTrtER- uJitE, You'll get Fat HMKh Captutot givM Mpful Information It H not Intandad to b of diagnostic iwtur THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 0 by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee I don't believe a word of it Q what all that talk about horoscopes wa. Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon. (Answers Monday) and 6 am available lot IZ2S aach phis S5 cants 2 killed, 12 hurt in grenade attack'. ASSOCIATED PRESS Islamabad, Pakistan A passerby hurled two hand grenades into a crowded mosque, killing two people and injuring 12, a newspaper report said Friday. The Muslim newspaper said 60 people were attending a service Thursday at the Masjid Manzilgah Mosque in the southern city of Suk-kur when the grenades were thrown. mm fwL &autMii ou mis I 5wJ OOOMVtctliON " TfTlXv, S!!IUStt J I in I, l-y if jy7;vty voir vJ K 3 I

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