Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas on December 6, 1937 · Page 5
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Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas · Page 5

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Hope, Arkansas
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Monday, December 6, 1937
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, HOPE, ARKANSAS THE Southwest Title Won By Rice Owls Tennessee Puts on Strong Finish to Beat Mississippi, 32-0 NEW YORK.—(XI 1 )—T)ic nice Owls Sutulny hold the title in the widest open of 1937 football conference races mul the New year's Day Bowl engagement thjit went with il; FloridH aw! Southern California enjoyed slightly higher rankings in their finnl conference standings thnn they previously hud hold; the nation's iindefoated-un- tlod list was reduced to 12 in the final count und the Pacific coast was suffering n mild blnckeyc, soothed by Kenny Washington'.-; foul of completing a near-record forward past). Those scattered developments marked tlie closing of the 1937 football season, except for a scant handful of games between now und Christinas. Rice won the Southwest Conference title by whipping Southern Methodist 15 to 7 Saturday to finish with four victories, one defeat i\nd one tie. Ernie Lain, the team's "trouble shooter," came in when the Owls were a point behind, scored two touchdowns and paved the way for Jock Vestal's field Konl. That ended a conference campaign which saw nearly every team in the loop on top at one time or another and automatically brought Rice an inviUi tion to play Colorado in the Cotton Bowl. The Owls accepted at once, although they still must net formal conference approval. Florida brought off tho biggest font in Die closing activity of the Southeastern Conference by upsetting Kentucky, six to nothing, with the aid of Ed Manning's 59-ynrd run. The 'Gators thus moved up to eighth place in the standings. Thcnnossec put on a .Hiirprusing strong finish to rout Mississippi 32 to nothing In the other conference game while Mississippi Slate took a nine lo nothing defeat from Duquesne as Boyd Brumbaugh's field goal and Srcbinski's 40-yard run with an intercepted pass gave the Dukes their first away-from-home victory. Southern California had to hold off a last-quarter thrust to beat UCLA. 19 to 13 in the Pacific Coast Conference finale and thus finish well ahead of its Los Angeles rival. However it was Washington's pass to Hal Hirshon for the first UCLA touchdown that really thrilled the 70,000 fans. It was variously estimated as traveling from GG to 73 yards. Either way they don't come much longer although the record hooks lists one successful heave of 87 yards. Otherwise the Pacific Coast took it on the chin in a pair of inlersectionnl games. Oregon, next to last in the conference, took a 20 to six setback from Arizona in a game murked by long runs. The Wobfoot.s made the best dash when Gerald Gru.vlx.-al went 9(1 yards for their score. Texas A. and M. handed the University of San Francisco Dons cine of their worst drub- bings, 42 to 0. Another major intersection!!! tilt saw Manhattan and Tul.su finish in a scoreless tit- after Vic Fusia of the Jaspers fumbled just short of the goal line. Hardin-Simmons of Texas, which had gone through eight fairly tough games without a setback, was held to a seven to seven tie by Howard Payne in its final game. Almost equally surprising was another seven to seven draw between Centenary and little Louisiana Tech. No Interference Wanted Lain, White Will to the TMg Show" Colorado and Rico Player to Meet in Cotton Bowl Bill De Correvont with the objecl of his nlfeclions, Dorothy Lugoril, on the campus of Austin High School of Chicago, for which the ^phenomenal back scored 33 touchdowns nncl amassed a total of 204 pomU in rune game's Do Correvont celebrated his 19th birthday by scoring three toui'tulou-ns and passing to the fourth as Austin* won thf Chicago high school championship from Leo, 20-0, at Soldiers Field' before 120.000 persons The largest crowd of the football season—college or preparatory—largely was due to De OrrevoiU's spectacular play of the past two campaigns. He enters college next fall 'Where'' Every coach would like lo know. Uy HARRY GRAYSON Sports Editor, NKA Service CHICAGO — Chicago's preparatory f-'diool cham|)ionship is .settled at Soldiers' Field before 120,000 persons. That is the largest gridiron gathering in history. Cleveland's high school title is determined the same afternoon as 47,315 spectators cheer. That crowds the all- time attendance record for that city, where Army has tackled Illinois and Noire Dume has played Navy. Both wore Christmas charity games, to be sure, but in the main it was the playing personnel and records of Ihe teams that brought out the patrons, The turnouts reflect the tremendous intresl in high school football. With the game so popular among the preps and grade school kids tossing footballs where they formerly ihrew baseballs, il goes wilhoul saying thut the college brand of gridiron goods will become better with each succeeding season. Bill De Correvont of Chicago's champion Austin High is a striking illustration of how quickly a football star is born these days. This blond back's amazing play of the past two campaigns largely was responsible for the packing of Soldiers' Field. Although suffering from u charley horse and plainly made nervous by the vast llirong, all De Correvonl did in 35 minutes on Ihe firing line was run 47 yards for one touchdown, plunge for two more, and pass into the end done for the fourth He also returned punts and punted. He faded back into the end /.one and quick- kicked 53 yards from the line of scrimmage. He is a remarkable- place-kick - er. De Correvonl scored 33 touchdowns in nine games—comj.ilfd a total of 2U4 points. He accounted for nine touchdowns in one contest. Another Red Grange De Correvont graduates Late next month, when he will make up his mind about college. Coaches for mi around would like to re-jd his mind now. While P# Correvpnt stands out, thsrv are reixirts of phenomenal high school players from rtll sections. Naturally, most of them are backs, for bocks catch the eye, but there no doubt is the same superabundance of linemen, and backs often are trans- | formed into linemen in college. As great as De Correvont is, scouts also wore attracted by his quarterbacking mate, Sonny Skor, and two or three Austin linemen who ended their high school playing careers on the identical momentous afternoon. Although my Peoria operatives have been describing Davey Miller of Toulon. 111., High as another Red Grange, with the explanation that they realize just how much territory- lhat includes, the name of this 17-year-old youngster appears on the second tea min some All-Illinois .selections. This is due to the preponderance of star high school backs in Illinois, ana also to the fact that Toulon is a very small school with no tough teams on its schedule. Miller .says that lie intends to enter Illinois, and it will be quite all right with Robert Xuppke if he turns out to be a second Grunge. Miller has the size. He now stands six feel one-imd-oue-half inches and weighs more than 180 pounds. He only has to live up lo half of his advance notices as a earner, blocker, passer, and kicker to make Xuppko repeat what he said when he first set eyes on Grange: "He'll make a great coach out of me." Freshman Flossy, Too Rob Smith completed his playing hours at Beaver High of Bluefield, heralded as the finest high school player ever developed in West Virginia, and is said to be headed for Roxbury Prep and then Yale. Bob Glass, Mii.ssillon, O., halfback, is being rushed fully as hard as Do Correvonl. The college freshman class before these boys also was of superior caliber. Tom Harmon, four-sport lad of Gary, Ind., and two or three boys from Kiski Prep school were so conspicuous among Michigan freshmen lhat their present incited reports of subsidization and an investigation. In five meetings with the varsity that held California to a scoreless tie, the Washington frosh prevailed on four occasions and obtained a draw. Stanford and Southern California had superlative freshman squads, which were not uncommon from one side of the continent lo the other. Certainly no player moving as though he had a man on his back is going to make a varsity in the years to come, for the multiplicity of talent will add to the intelligence and in- Patmos Wins Two From Columbus tfmrnet High School,A^ins Pair of Games From" Saratoga PATMOS, Ark.—Patmos High School senior boys basketball team defeated Columbus, 25 to 19 hist Friday night n Ihe Patmos gymnasium. Stafford. Piitmos guard, was lii^h point mini, icoring 12 points. Simmons of Piitmos was runner-up with five points. For Columbus, Cald- ivell and Couch scored five points each. The Patmos junior boys defeated Ihe Columbus juniors, 18 to 1. Camp, forward, and Lewis, forward, hit the aasket for 8 and (i points respectively to dike scoring honors. The Columbus senior girls team easily won over the Patmos seniors. 2!! to 15. Boyee and Wootscy of Columbus tied fo Humors, .scoring 1(1 |X>int,s each. For Patmos, Muyton led her learn in .scoring, making 7 points. Patmo.s plays Guernsey at Patmos Tuesday night. Friday night the Piit- mos teams play blevins at Palmos. Kmmel Teams Win EMMET, Ark.—Tho Emmet senior t'irls defeated the Saratoga girls in a basketball game at the F.mmct gymn Friday, December ,'i, by a .score 1 of 21 to 9. The Emmet girls played without their two stars, Crahb, a forward and Crumby, a gmird. They were ill. Crank was high scorer with 15 points. Brown and E. Jones started at guard positions. Gates led the Saratoga sconnc, with 0 points. The Emmet .senior boys defeated Ihe Saratoga senior Ixiys by the score of 24 lo 12. Paul and Wise slat red for Emmet, Reyengu and Wise led the Emmet boys in scoring with li points each Bluckwood led the Saratoga senior boys with 5 ixjints. The Saratoga boys B li-am defeated the Emmet hoys B team by LI score of 13 to 11. It has been estimated that 11 would cost $543,400,000 to make the entire St. Lawrence river navigable for oceangoing vessels. erea the pitch of the unending bald'-' between offense and defense DALLAS. Texas,—(/PI—It will be Whi/./.er and Ernie in the Collon Bowl. More specifically, Myron Raymond While of the Colorado University and KnipRt Herchc) Lain of Rice Institute, two of the nation's most publicized students of football, will be presented on the same gridiron here New Year's Day in the second annual e""'e of the Southwest's budding classic. White. 185-pound All-America back who twirls a F'hi Beta Kappa key on hit; watch chain and who will take oral examinations for n Rhodes scholarship at Denver, December 14 and 15, led Colorado to an unbeaten and untied season while also topping the nation's collegiate scorers. He alp up more than a mile of gridiron turf in scoring 122 of the 248 points Colorado scored. The modest president of the Colorado student body, who waits on tables in a fraternity house when he hasn't got his nose in a hook or hit foot across somebody's goal line, averaged 6.8 yards per try on 159 curries during Ihe regular season and completed 22 passes far an average of 14.2 yards on each. His coach, Bernard (Bunny) Oakes, who sat in the stands here Saturday and watched Rice tear up a soggy field, frankly lell you White is belter than the "Rod" Grange he once played alongside at Illinois. Lain. 218-pound sophomore, is tho strapping 'leen age youngster who reluctantly let a leg injury keep him out of the first three games—in which Rice failed |.o score—and then rushed into tho lineup to lead Rice to a Southwest Conference championship. Saturday, on the wind-swept Southern Methodist gridiron here, he made Ihe comeback of Race complete by slashing and passing the Owls to a 15 to 7 victory over the Mustangs. It gave Rice the title and the invitation to the Cotton Bowl which was accepted. The team which came off with nothing better than horsccollars in games with Oklahoma, Louisiana State, and Tulsa, welcomed this giant sophomore who pitched in, literally, and became responsible either directly or indirectly, for 12 of the 13 touchdowns Rice .scored in its last seven games. Never in the starling lineup, Lain always lumbers in just at the right time. A great passed with the same "right jab" throw of Slingin' 'Sani Baugh. Lain also is one of the burliest line-smackers the league has seen in years. Coach Matty Bell of SMU who watched Lain score two times against his club remarked: "What do I think of that big boy? He's great. I'd say he is a better runner than he is passer. All of which made Ernie Lain a very good runner, for he completed nine of the thirteen bombs he tossed for a total U Ml yards. DIZZY WAY This is the way Dizzy Denn advises professionals to clean up in the $10,000 Minml Biltmorc Open, Dec. 10-13. "This tee holds the most chances, soys tho great and eccentric right-hander of the St. Louis Uirclmals, as lie puts his prenching into practice at Coral Gabies Fla., scene of tho tournament. ' District, Three's Road Report Given Construction and Detour News for Local High- Wai District j The December report for road con- I diiion.s in District Three of the State i Highway Department was released lover the week-end by District Engineer Charles O. Thomas as follows: No. 4. Dierks to Hosslon. 67 miles {.'ravel, fair to good. Dierks south for lour miles, slippery after rains. liosston to Ouachita county line. 10 miles gravel, fair. Narrow road your for light traffic. Be cautious at curves. No. 8. Poul county line junction No. SI. 7 miles gravel, good. Proceed cautiously at low wnler bridge over Caddo river. No. 19. Columbia county line to Prescoll. 26 miles gravel, fair. Slippery al'ler rains. No. 24. Lockcsburg to Ouachila counly line. 71 miles gravel, fair to good. Loose gravel in places between Lockeshurg and Nashville. /No 2(1. Murfreesboro to Clark county line. 1G miles gravel, fair to good. Surface has been smooth recently. No. U7. Ben Lomond lo Mineral Springs, lli miles gravel, good Surface usually smooth. 0.5 mile asphalt ijood. No. 27. Mineral Springs to Nashville. 0.5 mile asphalt, good. 5 miles gravel, fair to good. Heavily traveled but usually smooth. Nashville to Murfreesboro. 12 miles asphalt, Rood. Shoulders in fair condition. Murfreesboro to Kirby. 1 mile asphalt, good. 14.5 miles gravel, fair to yoocl. Surface usually fairly smooth. No. 29. Louisiana state line to Blev- ing. 65 miles gravel, fair to good. Bradley south, usually rouse, some sections slippery after rains. No. 32. Oklahoma state line to Red Bluff. 40 miles gravel, fair to good. Oklahoma line lo Red Bluff good. Very poor east of Red Bluff. No. 41. De.Quo.en to Red river. 37 miles gravel, fair to good. Imppassable to ferry after rains. ,-No. 53. Junction 19 to Bodcaw. 10 liifiTes gravel,' fair lo gooci. Slippery when wet. Clark county line to Junction 24. 3 miles gravel, good. Surface usually smooth. No. 55. Mineral Springs to Fulton. 23 miles gravel, fair. Hills are slip- pert after rains. No. C7. Tcxarktinn to Clark county line. 41 miles concrete, good. Watch out for men working. No, 70. Oklahoma line lo Glenwood. 70 miles gravel: fair lo yood. Hills slippery when wet Glenwood to Polk county line. 4 miles asphalt, good. Shoulders in fair condition. No. 71. Louisiana slate line to Fouke. 21 miles gravel, good. Heavy oil field traffic. Fouke to Te.xarkana. 10 miles asphalt, good. Heavy oil field traffic. Texarkana to Index bridge. 8 miles concrete, good. Shoulders in fair condition. Index bridge to Ojjden. 2 miles gravel, good. Usually smooth. Ogden lo Ashdown. 6 miles concrete, good. Shoulders fairly good. Ashdown to Junction No. 27. 9 miles concrete, good. New gap recently completed. Junction 27 to Gilliam. 30 miles, gravel, fair lo good. Usually good to Loekesburg. Fair Locksburg to Gil' liam. Gilliam to Montgomery county line. 1 niilu asphalt, good. Shoulders f-iii condition. No. 73, Junction 73 and -I to Columbus. 13 miles gravel, fair. Usually Mood for typo and volume of traffic. Columbus to Saratoga, (i miles earth, poor. Impassable after rains. No. 82. Texarkana lo Garland. 10 miles concrete, good. A beautiful drive at this season. Garland lo Stamps. 12 miles gravel, fair. Usually rough from Garland to Stamps. Stamps to Columbia county line. 5 miles asphalt, good. Shoulders good, new job. No. 84. Kirby lo Clark county line. 9 mile.s gravel, good. Surface usually smooth. No. 128. Junction 24 to Junction 27. 17 miles gravel, guud. Good for type and volume of traffic. . -<a»»«ti^-- Fish have been made to come up for food at the sound of a buzzer, placed just above the water. 114 Meet Death \ on Icy Highways Hazardous Driving Conditions Take Toll Over the Week-end By the Associated Press Icy roads and other hazardous driving conditions sent automobile accident fatalities in the nation over the 100-mark for the week-enej. At least 114 persons died in traffic accidents. Deaths by stales; Arkansas 2, California 7, Connecticut 3, Florida 5, Georgia 9, Idaho 1, Illinois 4, Indiana 9, Kansas 1, Kentucky 2, Maryland 2, Michigan 11, Missouri 3, Nebraska 1, New Mexico 1, New York 8. Ohio 10, Oklahoma 1, Oregon 3, Pennsylvania 5. Texas 16, Virginia 4, Wisconsin G. A Thought We can not too often think that there is a never sleeping eye that reads the heart and registers our thoughts.—Bacon. Legal Notice IN THE HEMPSTEAD CHANCERY COURT BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF STREET IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. 3 OF HOPE, ARKANSAS PLAINTIFFS vs. NO 5126 DELINQUENT LANDS, LOTS, BLOCKS, OR PARCELS OF LAND AND RAILROAD TRACKS AND RIGHTS OF WAY IN SAID DISTRICT DEFENDANTS AND IN THE HEMPSTEAD CHANCERY COURT BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF CUKB Si GUTTER DISTRICT NO. 5 OF HOPE, ARKANSAS PLAINTIFFS vs. NO. 5125 DELINQUENT LANDS, LOTS, BLOCKS, OR PARCELS OF LAND AND RAILROAD TRACKS AND RIGHTS OF ' WAY IN SAID DISTRICT ) DEFENDANTS j NOTICE I All persons, firms or corporations having or claiming an interest in any of the following described lands, lots, blocks, or parcels of land, railroad trucks und rights of way, are hereby notified and warned thai separate suils are pending in the Chancery Court of Hempstead County, Arkansas, by the Board of Commissioners of each of the above named districts, to enforce the collection of certain delinquent taxes or assessments to 'each of the above named district's on the subjoined list of land, each supposed owner having been set opposite his or her or its land, together with the amounts several!} due from each lot, block, or parcel lo the said districts and Board of Commissioners as plaintiffs, to-wit: PARCEL NO. 1 Name of owner as shown by books of district: J. E. Cox (R. M. Berry) (J. D. Barlow) Description of property: Lots 1, 2, and 3 In Block 5 In City of Hope, Delinquent in each district for years and in amounts as follows; 1932, $29.75; 1933, $29.75; 1034, $29.75; 1935: $29;75; 1936, $29.75; 1937, $29.75. PARCEL NO. 2 Name of owner as shown by books of district: Dell McRae Denty Description of property: Lot 11, Block II, in City of Hope. Delinquent in each district for years and in amounts as follows: 1933, $10.00; 1934, $10.00; 1935, $10.00; 1936, $10.00; 1937, $10,00. PARCEL NO. 3 ' Name of owner as shown' by books of district: Arkaasas Machine Specialty Company Description of property: All of Lots 1, 2. 3, and 4 East of the Missouri Pacific Railway in Block 13 in the City of Hope. Delinquent in each district for years and in amounts as follows: 1933. $87.50; 1935, $87.50. PARCEL NO. 4 Name of owner as shown by books ot district: Estate of F. T. Taylor and Naomi Taylor. Description of property: East Half of Lot 8 and all of Lots 9 and 10 in Block 13 in City of Hope. Delinquent in each district for years and in amounts as follows: • 1933, $32.00; 1934, $32.00; 1935, $32.00; 1936. $32.00; 1937, $32.00. PARCEL NO. 5 Name of owner as shown by books of district: Estate of T. A. Turner. Description of Property: Lot 12, Block 13, City of Hope. Delinquent in each district for years and in amounts as follows: 1934, 528.25; 1936, $42.50; 1937, $42.50. PARCEL NO. 6 Name of owner as shown by books' of district: Estate of Amanda V. Campbell. Description of property: Lot 10 and West Half of Lot 11, Block 19, City of Hope. Delinquent in each district for years and in amounts as follows:' 1933, $16.75; 1934, $16.75; 1935, $16.75; 1936, 516.75; 1937, $16.75. . PARCEL NO. 1 Name of'owner as shown by books of district: Estale of Artie Newcomb. Description of property: Lot 3, Block 20, City of Hope. Delinquent in each district for years und in amounts as follows: 1930, $16.75; 1931, $16.75; 1932, $16.75; 1933, $16.75; 1934, $16.75; 1935, $16.75; 1936. S16.75; 1937, $16.75. PARCEL NO. 8 Name of owner as shown by books of district: Horace Cooper, Description of property: Part of Lot 1, Slavack Addn. described as follows; Beginning at the SW corner of Lot 3, Slavack Addn., thence Northeasterly along the South line of said Lot 3, 15( ft. thence N ortrl 17Vi degrees West 150 ft. to the point of beginning, thence West 17V!; degrees South to the East line of North Hazel St, thence South along the East line of said Hazel St., to the Southwest corner of said Lot 1 I hence Easterly along the South line o: ."aid Lot 1, 150 ft, thence North degrees West to the point of beginning Delinquent in each district for years and in amounts as follows: 1931, $1.25; 1932, $1.25; 1933, $1.25 1934, $1.25; 1935, S1.25; 1936, $1.25 1937, $1.25. PARCEL NO. 9 Name of owner as shown by books of district: J, A. Taylor Estate. , Description of property: Part ol NE'/4SW'/4 Sec. 28 Twp. 12 S. Rg. 24 W described as follows: Beginning at the NW corner of Block 3, City of Hope, and run North 17V ! j degrees West 6C ft. to the North line of 4th St., Ihonce Easl 17H; degrees North along the North line of 4th St 209 ft. to point of beginning, thence North 17 Vz degree! West 124 ft thence East 17',a degrees North to a point 70 ft. West and 1714 degrees North of the West line of North Hazel St., thence South degrees West 4 ft. thence East degrees North 70 ft. to the West line of North Hazel St., thence Southerly along the West line of said Hazel St. 120 ft., thence West 17^2 degrees South 100'« ft., to the point of beginning. SANTA CLAUS &nd COMPANY By KING COLE WHAT I'P CAll SHIP'SHAPE, MATKi THAT PETf R P0(.l> I'VE GOT lOOi RP9MS UKE THIS ANP TO THQUSASP /WPBE BOOMS T9POJ Delivery X>V.\S 1937 . BUT mi \T LAST Ufc IM, Kwi Ftjlmii SyniliuU. Int.. V.'.nlJ rist. Delinquent in each district for yeafs and in amounts as follows: 1932, $18.75; 1933, $18.75; 1934, $18.JS; 1935, $18.75; 1936, $18.75; 1937, fl8.K.' PARCEL NO. 10 Name of owner as shown by books of district: ' ~ Newt Little. Description of property: Port jat NE>/4 SW<4 Sec. 28, Twp. 12 §. M 24 W. described as follows: Segiflhi/ig at the NW corner of Block 3, City Of Hope, run thence North 17% Aegfpte West to the North line of 4th &,, thence East 17 ft degrees North fctong the North line of 4th St. 134 ft. to the point of beginning, thetiee East Ity^ degrees North 75 ft, thence North Hjft -. degrees We.4t 150 ft, thence WeSt 17% degrees South 75 ft, thence South 1?& degree East 150 ft. lo the point of beginning. Delinquent in each district for years and in amount? as follows: 1932, $11.25;1933, $1L25; 1934, $11.2$; 1935, $11.25; 1936, $11.25; 193?, |li.'.2j.. PARCEL NO. 11 ,,!..*' Name of owner as shown by books 6t district: '•''-! , , »/ Berry Sanders. . ' < ,,. * Description of property: Part > tit NE'X, SWVi Sec. 28, Twp. 12 S. Rj.. _ W., described at follows: Beginnih_ at the NW corner of Block 3, City' of Hope, ^hence North 17% degreesfJWest , 160 ft. to the point of beginning, thence East 17V6' degrees North 134 ft., thence North 17'/i degrees We'st 50 ft, thence West 17% degrees South 134 ft, thence South 17%'degrees East 50 ft. ti> the point of beginning. Delinquent in each district for years and in amounts as follows: 1931, $3.75; 1932, $3.75; 1933, $3,75! 1934, -$3.75; 1935, $3.75; 1936, ,~j$.1S} -, 1937, $3.75. • PARCEL NO. 12 • ' ' Name of owner as shown by books.of district: . A. Sullivan (stucco apartment tiouse) • . ,' Description of property: - Part' of NW/4 SW'/4'Sec. 28, Twp. 12 S. Rg. 24,, W., described as folipws:,. Beginning) at' the NW corner, Block's, City of "Kobe. thence .North 17%-degree West ,429;.f£ to the point of'beginning, thence Easit 17'/2 degreed North along the South life of 5th St. 142 ft. thence Soutn'W5 degrees .East 83 ft, therjce "West.yfe,. degrees South 142 ft. to the East \iOf-ot Elm Street., thence '. North 17M» d£- • grees West along the East line of,Elm " St 83 ft. to the ppint : of beginning* .,« Delinquent in each district for" years and in amounts as follows: - - 1933, 531.25; 1934, $31.25; 1935. $31.25; 1937, $31.25. ; > PARCEL NO. 13 . : , Name of owner as shown by books of district: .'•'•' " First National Bank-(Fay F. Sadler)" Description of property: Part of NEV4 SWV4 Sec. 28, Twp. 12 S. Rg. J 24 W., described as follows- Beginning a!' the NW corner, Block 5, City of Hope, thence North 17% degrees West.alofljJ The East line of Ehn St 286 ft. ,to v the point of beginning, thence East 17V4 degrees North 142 ft, thence North 17Vj degrees West .60 ft,, thence West 17V4 degrees South 142 ft. to the :jfast Line of Elm St, thence South 17M;"de- grees East along the East line of Elm St. 60 ft. to the point' of 'beginning.; 1 Delinquent in each district for'years and in amounts as follows: 1932, $18.75; 1933, $18.75; 1934, $18.75; 1935, $18.75; 1936, $10.00; 1937,' $10.00. PARCEL NO. 14 ^ Name of owner as shown by books pf district: First National Bank (W. -C. Taylor) Description of property; Part of NEV4 SW'/4 Sec. 28, Twp. 12 S. Rg. 24 W,, described as follows: Beginning /at the NW corner, Block 5, City of Hope, thence North 17 M> degrees West along the East line of Ehn St. 226 ft.-to the point of beginning, thence Easf 17T& degrees North 142 ft, thence North 17V6 degrees West GO ft. thence West, 17 Vt degrees South 142 ft, thence South 17'.<s degrees East along the East line of Elm St. 60 ft., to the point of beginning. Delinquent in each district for.years and in amounts as follows: 1933, $18.75; 1934, $18.75; 1935, • $18;75; 1936, $18.75; 1937, $18.75. PARCEL NO, 15 Name of owner as shown by books of district: Mrs. Jennie Barlow, Description of property: Part of NVi SWV4 Sec. 28 Twp. 12 S. Rg. 24 W. described as follows: Beginning at the NE corner Block 6, City of Hope, thence North 17Vi degrees West along the West line of Elm St. 549 ft. thence West m» degrees South 158 ft. to the point of beginning, thence South 17Vi degrees East 267 ft. thence West 17Vi degrees South to the East line of an extension of Vine St. (now Louisiana St.) thence Northerly along the East line of said extension of Vine St 267 ft. thence East 17',2 degrees North to the point of beginning. Delinquent in each district for years and in amounts as follows: 1934, $1.25; 1936, $1.25; J937, $1.25. All persons, firms, and corporations interesled in any of the said property are hereby warned and notifje4 that they are required by law to appear within four weeks and make defense " Lo said suits, or the same will be taken for confessed, and final judgrnent wiW be entered in each of said suits, djrect- ing the sale of said lands for the purr pose of collecting said delinquent laxes or assessments, together with Ihe payment of interest, penalty, attorney's fees and court costs adjudged against each tract The amount of the delinquencies for each year in ojvs of the said districts is the amount shown. A like amount exists in the other district, as the§e distrfctg coygf lie same territory, and the Sftbie Delinquencies e*ist against the property n each district WITNESS My hand and the seal of h<i Cliancery Court of Hempstcad • County, Arkansas, this 19 day of November, 1937. m Clerk of Chancery e<wtft fil Hempstcad County, Ikw

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