Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas on October 14, 1935 · Page 2
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Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas · Page 2

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Slackers? THE WA« YM6 W6RB CAUGD , Beftvtf ¥hy Fr<m False Report t tt» MAKE OF ***» Wefcfcutey sttetftoon by StM Publishing Co., Inc. At-iSfejK ttt WasRburn), at th6 Star building, 212-214 Sottlh , Hdfee, Arkaasas. TOPAY tS TH6 WILLiMCMESS SACRIFICES *ft> K6et> THIS C. fi. PALMER, ALEX. It. WASMStlRN. Editor and Publisher as second-class tfiattef at the postoffice at Hojpe, ArkSnsas 1897 Dtflftltfoft: "The newspaper ts an Institution developed by modem clvil- present th« ttews of the day< to foster commerce and Industry. ely dKcuteted advertisemertfas, and to furnish that check upon which no constitution has ever ba»n able to provide."— Col. R. « Sttbictftrtlon Bate (Always Payable in Advance): By city carrier, per WNN*f ttfe! per month 6$ one year $6.50. By mail, in Hempstead, Nevada, FoWttrdV Miller and LaFayette counties, $3.50 per year; elsewhere $6 50 Phisr 2% Arkansas Sales Tax. • . ot *he Associated Press; The Associated Press Is exclusively entitled to the use for repuhUcation of all news dispatches credited to it or tta* otherwise credited In this paper snd also the local news published herein. -i n* ^ 1 i i ,"-*-• i ..... ! - ...... — • • • ... ... _ . ,, Nattonftt Advfrtlslnff Representatives: Arkansas Dailies, Inc.. Memphis. '*"eftft« Sterfck Btdg.; New York City, 369 Lexington; Chicago, 111., 75 E. Wack- et, EWVe; feetfoit, Mich, J338 Woodward Ave.-, St. Louis, Mo., Star Bldg. ' Cfiaffes »m Tr)But«. Etc.: Charges will be made for all tributes, cards Qf thanKS, resolutions, or memorials, concerning the departed. Commercial he*SiJane*s hold to this policy in the news columns to protect their readers frorft a deluge of space-tekinpt memorials. The Star disclaims responsibility tor tnfc s^ftJ'keeping or return of any unsolicited manuscripts. By PR MORRIS F1SHBEIN HEALTH Editor, Journal, of the American Medical Association, and ot Hygeio, the Health Magazine _ Little Iron Will Fill Needs of Your Body Long ago, when it was first realized that husban beings ought to have a certain amount of mineral substances jdaily in their diets, a gocid deal on •iren» It was said that the average person wasn't getting enough of this sub- ftance and that he ought to supplement the iron to keep the blood at a Mgh level. ' j Eventually the-6 came the fad for raisins which people ate to increase the iron in. their blood. Actually, of course, the raisin is- excelled by a good many other substances in iron contnt. t Investigators at the University of Michigan have made some new studies to find out how much iron the normal human being requires each day. There ai-e lots of ways of going about this problem. iOne of the first was to find out how nftuch. iron was lost from the body. eyery day in the exretions. Obviously ' the iron that was lost ought, to be re- t placed, to keep the balance. *Next, the ordinary foods eaten by qverage people were studied to find Out how much iron was taken into the Body every day. This was necessary •fo see how much had to be,taken in * each day to balance the amount given out. " « * =• TJiese diets' then were tested not only on normal people but on people who were ill. As a result of these studies it was < found that the iron requirement of the normal adult male is not more than five milligrams each day. Five milligrams means actually 5/1000 of a gram. Since there are 425 grams in a pound, it is easy to estimate what a small amount of iron is actually concerned in this minimum requirement. Women may require more iron at certain intervals ; than at others. However, even under these circumstances, only 9.1 milligrams of iron is needed each day. It is relatively simple to get this amount of iron into the human body, since such foods as meats, whole wheat bread, apples, tomato juice, eggs and many other substances provide some iron.. • 'The ordinary person does not need extra iron in the form of pills. This does not apply, however, to those who are sick with any form of the anemias, in which there is a considerable loss net only of the blood cells but of the red coloring matter in the cells. For such people extra amounts of iron are required. These extra amounts are best obtained through suitable prescription by the physician. struction about the folly of impractical idealism during 1 a revolution. Published by Smith and Haas, the book sells for S2.75. ii YOUR - -— — — "— "- ' .'l^lLLl. I>I_IB CHILDREN By Olive Roberts Barton Mother's Self-Sacrifices Sou- Seed of Selfishness. A BOOK A DAY 'Mama, can't I go along?" 'Well—if you want to. But you won't have a good time, Mary. I'm going to get a dress and hat for myself. You'll get very tired." "No, I won't get tired. I don't want o say here." So Mary went along, or rather mother went along, with Mary. For you ee, when they got downtown to the jig store, Mary saw things she want- id. A smart plaid coat and cap caught her eye first. It was on the figure of child about her age. "I need a new coat, mother. Can't '. just try it on?" Mother hesitated. Why, she thought, ladn't she taken the other elevator that did not lead through the children's department? "I guess you don't need a new coat as much as I need a dress, dear. Your blue is still very nice." The clerk approached. "Isn't that a lovely coat? The cap goes with it. It's a special today and only $7.95 for both. Why don't you let her try it on? This little bit of red goes so well with • darkvhair." Glving ; tUp the Clothes Mother had to confess that Mary looked extremely well-turned-out. Silently she did some rapid figuring. If she did without a hat and bag it would just about make it. She could get a brown dress to go with her old brown felt instead of the complete new green outfit she had planned. She sighed. "I never saw her look so nice. I think—I guess—yes, we'll take it." Mcry danced with joy. "Can't I wear it home?" "Well—all right. Send the old one. please." Off to the ladies' dresses, then. She tried on several. There was a brown that suited her nicely, but it was too high-priced. "I think I'll wait until Saturday," she said, "when your cheaper ones come in." - On the way out they went through the children's department again. A little girl was trying on a smart jersey dress. "Mother, look," cried Mary, "that's Sally Smith. I wish I had a dress like that." By BKUCE CATTON A Heroine Who Just Made Things Worse. A shining example of what happens when the idealistic amateur tries to draw a hand in a revolution being conducted by professionals is the story of Charlotte Corday. This charming and high-minded Frenph girl sought to end the bloody confusion of the reign of terror during the French revolution by killing Jean Paul Marat, leader of the terrorists. She succeeded only in making everything worse. Her story is told, sympahtetically and intelligently, by Joseph Shearing, in "The Angel of the Assassination," a biography which might be an excellent object lesson for well-intentioned folk who think they would like to live through a revolution. Charlotte Corday was the child of poor but nobly-born parents, and she grew up in an abnormally sheltered atmosphere. She was an educated woman and a fervent idealist; and her heroes, in the French revolution, were those brave, admirable and utterly ineffectual people known to history as the Girondins—the "moderates," who got out of the revolution just what middle-of-the-road people usually get. She slew Marat to end the terror. £o what? So the terrorists redoubled thei refforts. They cut off her head and a great many more, including thott- of practically all the heroes she tried to save. Her martyrdom v/as worse than useless; and in Mr. Shear-' ing's book there is a wealth of in- "Isn't that cute!" smiled another clerk. "We're almost giving those dresses away today. They come in all shades, too." Sc Mother Got Nothing. They were a bargain as it happened, so Mary got two. And before she left the store she also had new shoes and socks. Because her mother decided that while she was doing it she might as well stock her right. The brown dress could wait a month and children had to look nice. Her old black would do well enough for Mrs. Smith's tea. What we are wondering is about that dress and hat next month. Will mother get them or will Mary convince her by that time that she needs a fur piece, or something? And as the years go on, will Miss Mary always look like a million dollars beside her shabby mother? And isn't it possible, too, that she may learn tp think it selfish I and heartless if she does not get every- j thing first? I think mother should have marched off alone, bought the green outfit she had worked and longed for. But mothers aren't made that way, are • they? ' | Joe Louis says his hands are all right, having soaked them in hot water. Even a fighter, it items, gives in to his bride on the matter of dishwashing. "lowan arrested on hoy-stealing charge." The news item failed to reveal whether he had demanded ransom. Birds of a feather flock together. Perhaps for protection from Sallv Rand. The pet goose of a Tennessee farn- I ily has produced 658 eggs, providing at i last an attainable objective for tho i braves. i Congressman ropes, throws and ties i a steer in 39.1 seconds at Oklahoma i rodeo. That seems rather slow, but | then he wasn't used to the- roping and ' tying. IS HEREBY GIVEN: That in pursuance of the authority and directions contained In the decretal order of the Chancery Court of rtemp' stead County, Arkansas, made and entered on the 2nd day of September, 1935, In n certain Cause No. 2914, then pending therein between Curb & Gutter District No* 7 ot nl, plaintiffs, and O. P. Casey, et al. defendants, the undersigned, ns Commissioner of the said Court will offer for sale at public outcry, at the front door or entrance of the Court House in the Town of Washington, Hempstead County, Arkansas, Within the hours prescribed by law for judicial sales, on Tuesday, the 12th day of November, 1935, the following described real estate located in the City of Hope, Hempstead County, Arkansas, towit: Part of the SW'/i NEVi of See. 33. Twp. 12 S. R. 24 West, in the City of Hope, Hempstead County, Arkansas, more particularly described as follows: Begin at a point on the East line of South Main Street in the City of Hope, Arkansas, said point being North nVi degrees West 357 feet from the intersection of said East line ot South Main Street with the South line of the said SW'X, NE'4 of said Sec. 33; run thence with said East line of South Main Street South 17 W> degrees East 105 feet, run thence at right angles to South Main Street. Easterly 150 feet, run thence Northerly and parallel to South Main Street 105 feet, run thence at right angles I to South Main Street 150 feet, back to the point of beginning. Part of the SWV4 NEV 4 of Sec. 33. Twp. 12 S. R. 24 West, in the City of Hope, Hempstead County, Arkansas, more particularly described as follows, to-wil: Beginning at the point of intersection of the East line of South Main Street in the City of Hope, Arkansas, with the South line of the said SW'/i NE'A of Sec. 33, Thence with said East line of South Main Street North 17V4 degrees West 12 feet to the point of beginning, thence East 157 feet, thence Northerly ana' parallel with South IIECIN HERB TODAV JEA.> IJU.M.V pretty. -1, I* «eo- retarj to UO.NALU MO.\TAGU12 lawyer. UOBBt W A I. LACK, nu- tonjohllr «nle»ninQ, haft rreqncnfl7 nuked bet in mnrrj him. hot Jean delay* het nnnwer At rh« ttolden Feather nlghi club ihe meet* 3ANDY tlAnjtl.VS L. All II* uLE.V.N federal cure at. Ions a friend ot Jpnn itnd* Botitay In trvlnc to trail WIN«JX LEWIS hnnft rnhher H» <*onfl<tp» Hr-tntl* ol the vane to Ml* trlrnti MIKl* ' nf th<> ini-nl nolloe fnri-t> nnd FtnhhT <r« to 1T»» Pp.nttior a en In nnd *rr pre .vlth Mn. 'nnd MH«> rhey nil an to the t-ow- Jenn Oolrton SnnrtT LEWIS !•' nnnrtmrnt l.crrl. tell* hr renntt in hny n nnr. "n *t»or.|nl fob- worth Sin.lMio HP .How. IIOI>J>T «nmr hnml« rvorth <li>l1l»l nnd «nr» it- Rahtr* - n n *eU thorn for him he rrlu *„* f|,<- „„, ntlfl itnhhy «rlH hiiTe $2nno nrnflt Rohhr nrrnneeii to toll thorn to Jonn » »mnlnTer. nnri Hncnn «p , with throe men nt Tlie i ioien Ppnthpr They in«l)Poi one of the men mn» hp l,prrl« i nrrT hr "'e« n vrnltpr to hrtnc the nmn'« rrl.n««. hnplntr to «o<-nro flncrorprlnts. The rrnlfcr tnlJc. tlic monpT. hiit hrlnc* n illftprpnl cln^i. NOW no nn wiTn THE STORY CHAPTER XI CEVERAL days later. Larry Glenn leaner) back In hi? swivel shalr extended his ions iese under nip desk, dropped the letter ne dad been reading, and frowned thonehi fully at the blanh wall ot hip offlrft For nearly a minute he sat thus bis hands clasped behind hi* head: then he reached for hi? telephone and eave the number of police head quarters. "Detective bureau— Sergeant Hagan." he said, when he got his number. Then, a moment later: "Mike! Tbls's Glenn. Can you drop up here tor u few minutes? I sot a funny one for you." He put the phone away and con tinued to look pensively at noth Ing. When. 15 minutes later. Mike Hagan came in. Larry ruefully handed him the letter. "Seems as If our friend Evelyn is running around with somebody else," be said. "1 send in those fingerprints off that glass, and there's no record of 'em. They're no more like Wingy Lewis's than mine are." Hagan read the letter and dropped it on the desk. "Look," he said, "did you see that waiter get the glass?" Larry/ nodded. "What'd he do with it? Bring it right to you?" asked Hagan. Larry thought a moment. "No, come to think of 1t. He went out to the kitchen with His tray of empties, and then he brought our order— and slipped me the glass." His eyes met Hagan's. "So," be said presently. "You think he switched glasses on me?" Hagan ran his linger through bis hair and took out a cigar. "I think they're kind of a tough crowd at the Golden Feather," ne said. "I got a notion that waiter thought things over on bis way out and decided not to help turn in one ot their star customers if he could help it." "Yeah." said Larry. "Yeah, that's probably what happens. And If be switched glasses on me, ne undoubtedly told Lewis about it— if It is Lewis —right afterward. Which means that Lewis knows, ay aow, that somebody Is interested In him . . . which may mean thai the whole mob'll run for cover." Eoelyn said, "Lannlng called. He got a buzz from downtown. . . . Somebody's going to be loo/ting for Sandy at the Colden Feather tonight." was another silence. Then •*• Hagan asked, "Say, did you no. tice that long light-haired guy that wag wltb 'em— 1 mean, did you notice blm especially?" "I took a good look, but it didn't tell me anything. Why?" "Well. 1 looked, too; and It seem? to me that be comes pretty close to tilting a description we got for one of tbo men $at stuck up the Acme Box Company's payroll that day last week." Larry looked up with new Interest in his eyes; but all ho said was Well, you know what those descriptions are like — you could pinch 'most anybody on 'em." "Well, I know." said Hagan. "It's not only that. Far as that goes, he fits It; 'Six feet one or two, light- haired, tanned complexion, broad shoulders—' but that isn't all. , . . D'you know about that stickup?" Larry shook his head. "Just an ordinary stickup," said Hagan, with the air of one to whom robbery Is no novelty. "Friday evening is payday at the Acme plant, and every Friday afternoon the cashier gets his flivver and drives over to the 105th street branch of the Dover Trust Company and gets the dough — it runs to about ?2000. Don't ask me wby they didn't have an express company deliver it with an armored truck. They just didn't. "Anyhow, last Friday a touring car crowds this cashier's flivver over to the curb as he's on bis way back to the plant, it's broad daylight, but it happens on one ot those deserted streets back of the freight yards there and there's nobody to see. A young fellow gets out ot the car, sticks a gun In the cashier's face, and takes the money before you can say Boo. Tben he gets back in the touring car and bis buddy, at the wheel, gives ber the gas, and that's all there is to it. (CVV7ELL, what I happened to " think of is tbi* Tne casnler gives us this description, which as you say don't help much. But he says that the guy with the gun sort of looked like a cowboy. "I didn't think much of it, at the time. But since we were In the Golden Feather the other night I been thinking; that long drink of water at that table there—didn't he have a sort of cowboy air about him?" Larry pursed his lips thoughtfully, "I don't know but what be did. now you mention it," be said. "He did seem sort of—western, corne to think of it. Think your cashier could Identify him?" "Might be worth a trial," said Hagan. "Listen," said Larry suddenly, "I don't care whether you can bang anything on this cbap or not. Bui If you can get enough of an idem! fication to warrant you iii bringing a forma) charge against him, you can take him down to headquarters and get bis linger prints. Tben 1 can seat them in to Washington and we can see if he has a record —and it be's a member of Jaclisou's mob." He touched the detective's sleeve. "Do that," be said. "Have somebody pick bim up tonight — he's pretty certain to be there at the Golden Feather, judging by past performances, and If be isn't there tonight be'll be thero tomorrow nlgbt. Look, Mike ... it tbls Is part ot tbe Red Jackson gang hang ing around in Dover, they're bang- Ing acouod tor some reason. Something la being planned. Now is my R by Robert Bruc* © 1933 NEA Service, Inc. chance to get on the trail ot U. All i ask ts chat you can just get a cbarge placea against ibis fellow. Twenty-four aours after i get a Is prints I SB.D tell you tt he's In the Jackson 0106 or oot. See?" Hagan stood up. "I'll KO onctt to the detective bureau now and detail a couple men tc E;O out there with me toniebl and oring nlm in." he said. "And I'll nave someone else eet thai cashier down to have a squint at him." • • * •"PHE unexpected angles to police *• work ID a oig'city are numerous. Hagan did as he bad promised, that afternoon. To put tbe order through ne got authority from the deputy inspector temporarily In charge of the oureau. The order was read at afternoon roll call It passed through tbe bands ot three clerks. And halt an nour after It was Issued, a man slipped quietly out ot the detective bureau, went to a drug store across the street, entered a telephone booth and called a number. He spoke Into the Instrument In a low voice, his lips close to tbe mouthpiece. "Hello—Frosty? This is Tommy. Listen. 1 got a tip tor you. Pass the word to Oklahoma, will youJ . . . Oklahoma—you know, the tall— sure. him. . . . Listen; tell Oklahoma that he's gonna be fingered for the Acme payroll ]ob. . . . Acme, you MIR — A-C-M-E—get It? Okay. At the club. Tonight Tell Al." Then he huns up the receiver and unobtrusively went back to the detective bureau. And after a while, as Art Lan- nlng walked from his olllce to the kitchen o( the Golden Feather, one of the waiters drew him aside "1 gotr.a tip they're going to put the linger on that sandy-haired guy from Oklahoma here tonight for the Acme payroll stickup." ne said quietly. Lanning looked al nlm. nodded, and went back to his office There he took his telephone and dialed a number. "Hello — Eve? Tuis's Lanning. Listen. Tell Sandy to stay away tonight. 1 iust got the word they're getting ready to bans a payroll rap on him. . . . Yeah, the Acme lob. . . . They're supposed to be here tonight to pick him up. ... No, that's all I know." Evelyn Brady strolled into the living room of her apartment. Lewis was at his ease in a Dig arm chair, smoking a cigar and listen- Ing to tbe play-by-play description of a ball game coming over the radio. Sandy was stretched out on the davenport, his muscular body relaxed, panther-like, his shirt opeti at the throat, a detective story ID his tanned list. "Sandy," said Evelyn, "Lanning called. He got a buzz from somebody down town. Somebody 8 going to be looking for you at the Golden Feather tonight," Sandy looked at ber inquiringly. "What for?" "Some payroll stickup. Acme, or something lihe tbat." Lewis peered at him over tbe end of his cigar. Sandy went back to bla book. "Weil, what about it?" asked the girl. Sandy lowered the book. "Keep your shin on," be said. "I'll lust stay away, that's all." "Going to stay In town?" "Sure. 1 got an assignment here." She laughed. "Yes, I know. A blond assignment. She's kind ot cute too, Saudy." "Yeah. She's cute ail right. Sne'e going to be useful, too." (To lie CoutUiued) Main Street 101 feet, thence Wester y and at Hght angles to South Main Sttefet ISO feet to a point on theTMBt lift* of South Main Street, thence South along the East line of South Mftin Street S4 feet to the point of beginning. Part of the S% of the SE'/4 of Sec. 33-, TWp. 12 S, R. 24 West, in the City of Hope, Hempstead County, Arkansas, more particularly described as follows, to-wit: Beginning 'at a point on the East line of South Main Street in the City of Hope, Arkansas, which point is South It'A degrees East GO feet from the Southwest corner of Lot 18, Block 7, Cornelius Heights Addition to the City of Hope, Arkansas, run thence South 17V4 degrees East along the East line of South Main Street 240 feet, run thence East 150 feet, run thence Northerly and parallel with South Main Street 240 feet to the South Line of Cornelius Street, run thence West along the South Jine of Cornelius Street to the point of beginning. TERMS OF SALE: All sales shall be for cash, and to the highest legal bidder; provided, however, that only so much of each tract of property will bo sold us will pay the assessment, cost and penalty, and no more. WITNESS My hand as such Commissioner, and the seal of said Court. on this 14th day of October. 1935. DALE JONES, COMMISSIONER Oct. 14, 21, 28 OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: That in pursuance of the authority and directions contained in the decretal order of the Chancery Court of Hemn- stcad County, Arkansas, made and entered on the 2nd day of September, 1935, in a certain Cause No. 2916, then | pending therein between Curb & Glitter District No. 5, ct al, plaintiffs, and R. N. Berry Estate, et al, defendants, the undersigned, as Commissioner of the said Court, will offer for sale at public outcry, at the front door or entrance of the Court House in the Town of Washington, Hempstead County, Arkansas, within the hours prescribed by law for judicial sales, on Tuesday the 12th clay of November, 1935, the following described real estate located in the City of Hope, Hempstead County, Arkansas, to-wit: Lots Three (3). Four (4), Five (5) and Six (6) in Block Twelve (12) in the City of Hope, Arkansas. Part of the NE'/ 4 of the SW'A of Sec. 28, Twp. 12 S. R. 24 .West, in Hempstead County, Arkansas, more particularly described as follows, towit: Begin at the Northeast corner of Block 5 in the City of Hope, Arkansas, thence North 17% degrees West 60 feet to the point of beginning, run thence West 17'/2 degrees South 108 feet, run thence North 17'^ degrees West 100 feet, run thence East 17M- degrees North 108 feet, run thence South 17'/2 degrees East along the West line of Main Street 100 feet to the point of beginning. Part of the NE'/i SW'/i of Sec. 28, Twp.. 12 S. R. 24 West, in Hempstead County, Arkansas, more particularly described as follows, to-wit: Begin at the Northeast corner of Block 5 in the City of Hope, Arkansas, and run thence North 17'/£ degrees West 60 feet, run thence West 17'/i degrees South 108 feet along the North line of Fourth Street (West Avenue D), to the point of beginning, run thence West 17Vi degrees South 50 feet, run thence North 17V4 degrees West 150 feet, run thence East 17 Vi degrees North 50 feet, run thence South 17','.. degrees East 150 feet to the point of beginning. Part of the NEV-i SW'/i of Sec. 28, Twp. 12 S. R. 24 West, in Hempstend County, Arkansas, more particularly described as follows, to-wit: Begin at the Northeast corner of Block 5 in the City of Hope, Arkansas, run thence North 17 Vi degrees West 160 feet to the point of beginning, run thence West 17'A degrees South 142 feet, run thence North 17Vi degrees West 86 feet, run thence East 17M> degrees North 142 feet to the West line of Main Street, run thence South ITVfe degrees East along the West line of Main Street 86 feet to the point of beginning. Part of the NE'/i SW'/4 Sec. 28, Twp. 12 S. R. 24 West, in Hempstead County, Arkansas, more particularly described as follows, to-wit: Begin at the Northwest corner of Block 5, in the City of Hope, Arkansas, and run thence North 17 '/*• degrees West 60 feet to the North line of Fourth Street (West Avenue D), the point of beginning, run thence East 17'/2 degrees North 142 feet, run thence North 17 Vis degrees West 150 feet, run thence West 17'/^ degrees South 142 feet, run thence South 17Va degrees East 150 feet along the East line of Elm Street to the point of beginning. TERMS OF SALE: All sales shall be for cash, and to the highest legal bidder; provided, however, that only so much of each tract of property will be sold as will pay the assessment, cost and penalty, and no more. WITNESS My hand as such Commissioner, and the seal of said Court, on this 14th day of October, 1935. DALE JONES, COMMISSIONER Oct. 14, 21, 28 COMMISSIONER'S NOTICE OF SALE S«S. 28, Twp. 12 S. R. 24 West, In Hempstead County, Arkansas, ttWrB particularly described ai follow*, towlt: Begin at the Northeast corner of Block 5 In the City of Hope, Arkansas, thence North 17Mi degrees West (10 feet to the point of beginning, ruH thence West 17M> degree* South IOJL feet, run thence North 17',4 degreUKjj West 100 feet, run thence East 1'Cp degrees North 108 feet, run thenc3"*. South 17h degrees Ensl along the West line of Main Street 100 foot to the point of beginning. Part of the NE'li SW'/i of Sec. 28. Twp.. 12 S. R. 24 West, in Hempstoad County, Arkansas, more particularly described as follows, to-wit: Begin lit the Northeast corner of Block 5 in the City of Hope, Arkansas, and run thence North 17 •& degrees West GO feet, run thence West 17'/i degrees South 108 feet along tho North line of Fourth Street, (West Avenue D), to the point of beginning, run thence West 17',i degrees Soutn 50 feet, run thence North 17'A degrees West 150 font, run thence East 17Vii degrees North 50 feet, run thence South 17'.i degrees East 150 feet to tho point of beginning. Part of the NE'/ 4 SW'/i of Sec. 28,; Twp. 12 S. R. 24 West, in Hempstead County. Arkansas, more particularly described, as follows, to-wit: Begin at the Northeast corner nf Block 5 in the City of Hope. Arkansas, run thence North 17'A degrees West 160 feet to the point of beginning, run thence West 17',i degrees South 142 feet, run thence North 1714 degrees West 86 feet, run thence East 17Vi desrecs North 142 feet to the West, line of Main Street, run thence South 17M, degrees East along the West line of Main Street 86 feet to the point of beginning. Part of the NE'/ 4 SWVi Sec. 28, 12 S. R. 2'1 West, in Hempstead Coul ty, Arkansas, more particularly d scribed as follows, to-wit: Begin at the Northwest corner of Block 5, in the City of Hope, Arkansas, and run thence North 17'Xj degrees West 60 feet to trie North line of Fourth Street (West. Avenue D), the point of beginning, run thence East 17i/fe degrees North 142 feet, run thence Worth 17 W degrees West 130 feet, run thence West 1714 degrees South 142 feet, run thence South 17',^ degrees East 150 feet along the East| line of Elm Street to the point of be-| ginning. :l TERMS OF SALE: All sales shall b£J for cash, and to the highest legal bid-J dor; provided, however, that only so,j much of each tract of property will sold as will pay the assessment, cost; and penalty, and no more. WITNESS My hand as such Commissioner, and the seal of said Couvt. en this 14th day of October. 1935. DALE JONES, COMMISSIONER Oct. 14. 21, 28 I NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: That in pursuance of the authority and directions contained in the decretal order of the Chancery Court of Hempstead County, Arkansas, made and entered on the 2nd day of September, 1935, in a certain Cause No. 2915, then pending therein between Street Improvement District No. 9, et al, plaintiffs, and R. N. Berry Estate, et al, defendants, the undersigned, as Commissioner of the said Court, will offer for sale at public outcry, at the front door or entrance of the Court House in the Town of Washington, Hempstead County, Arkansas, within the hours prescribed by law for judicial sales, on Tuesday the 12th day of November, 1935, the following described real estate located in the City of Hope, Hempstead County, Arkansas, to-wit: Lots Three (3h Four (4), Five (5) and Six (6) in Block Twelve (12) in the City of Hope, Arkansas. Port of the NE'/i of the SW'/i of COMMISSIONER'S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: Tha in pursuance of the authority and dij rcction.s contained in the decreto order of the Chancery Court of Hemp| stead County, Arkansas, made ancj entered on the 2nd day of September 1935, in a certain Cause No. 2917, the' pending therein between Street Iml provement District,-No.-11, et al plair tiffs, and G. P. Casey, ct al, defend ants, the undersigned, as Commiij gioncr of the said Court will offer fjf sale at public outcry, at tho front do or entrance of the Court Hou.se.jj the Town of Washington, Hempsti County, Arkansas, within tho hq prescribed by law for judicial on Tuesday, the 12th day of Novcmlj 1935, the following described estate located in the City of Ho| Hempstead County, Arkansas, towign Part of the SWVi NEVt of Sec, $},; Twp. 12 S. R. 24 West, in the City^f Hope, Hempstead County, Arkans more particularly described as ft) lows: Begin at a point on the East line South Main Street in the City Hope. Arkansas, said point being North 17i-i degrees West 357 feet fron the intersection of said East line o^ Soulii Main Street, with the South line of the said SW'/.'i NE'/ 4 of said- Sec. 33; run thence with said East line of South Main Street South 11% degrees East 105 feet, run thence at right angles to South Main Street, | Easterly 150 feet, run thence Northerly , and parallel to South Main Stieet' 105 feet, run thence at right angles i to South Main Street 150 feet, back,! to the point of beginning. Part of the SWV4 NE'/i <tf Sec. 33 Twp. 12 S. R. 24 West, in the City Hope, Hempstead County, Arkansas more particularly described us folfe lows, to-wit: Beginning at the point of intersect lion of the East line of South Mair Street in the City of Hope, Arkansas,!^ with the.- South line of the said SW'A NE',.| of See. 33, Thence with said East lino of South Main Street North 17Ms degrees West 12 feet to the point of.J beginning, thence East 157 feet, thence Northerly nnd parallel with South; Main Street 101 feet, thence Westerly and at right angles to South MaiE Street 150 feet to a point on the Eas| line of South Main Street, thenc^ South along the East line of South'; Main Street 54 feet to the point ofiy beginning. V-^H- Part of the S'/i of the SE'/i of Sec. 1 *' 1 , 33, TWp. 12 S. R. 24 West, in the City of Hope, Hempstead County, Ar.- kansus, more particularly described as follows, to-wit: Beginning al a point on the East line of South Main Street in the City of Hope, Arkansas, which point is South 17',;; degrees East 60 feet from the Southwest corner of Lot 18, Block i 7, Cornelius Heights Addition to the I City of Hope, Arkansas, run thence (South 17'/2 degrees East along the East line of South Main Street 240 feet, run thence East 150 feet, run thence Northerly and parallel with South Main Street 240 feet to the South Line of Cornelius Street, run thence West ! along the South line of Cornelius I Street to the point of beginning. j TERMS OF SALE: All sales shall be ! for cash, and to the highest legal bidder; provided, however, that only so 1 much of each tract of property will be -sold as will pay the assessment, cost and penalty, and no more. WITNESS My hand as such Commissioner, and the seal of said Court, an this 14th day o f October, 1935. DALE JONES, COMMISSIONER Oct. 14, 21, 28

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