The Indianapolis Star from Indianapolis, Indiana on February 28, 1929 · Page 17
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The Indianapolis Star from Indianapolis, Indiana · Page 17

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Indianapolis, Indiana
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Thursday, February 28, 1929
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Page 17
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THE TXm.WAPOI.lS STAT?, TUmSD.W. FKHKCAin i. 1020. B HOTEL READr it mm Enlarged $600,000, Eight-Story Graham to Be Opened to Public Monday. Special to Tfe Indinnapoli.n Slnr.) BLOOMINGTON, Ind., Feb. 27. Bloomington'a new eijrht-atorv, $00,-000 Graham hotel will be opened to the public next Monday. To Bloomington this will be an event almost as important as the Inauguration of President-elect Hoover will be to the nation. Hotel rooms have been at a premium in Bloomington for several years, as any one attempting to atay over night after a football game can well testify. Preston C. Gilliatt. the builder of this new hotel, has taken good care of the traveling public in his old Graham hotel and his Tourner hotel for the last ten years, but has been greatly handicapped by a shortage of rooms on an average of four nights a week. Bloomington is one of the fastest growing towns in the state and is in excellent business condition today. This is the center of the limestone Industry of the entire country, for about 90 per cent of the. building limestone used is quarried in this district. There are something like seventeen independent companies operating on a full-time basis. Has Largest Furniture Factory. This is also the seat of the largest furniture factory in the world the Showers Brothers Company which now manufacturers a complete line cf medium-priced furniture- Bloomington is also the home of Indiana university, which brings about five thousand students as temporary residents. It is expected that when census figures are published next year that the population of greater Bloomington will not be less than 20,000, which would represent almost a. 100 per cent gain in the last decade. With the building of Indiana university's new stadium and field house there Is now sufficient seating capacity for thousands ot out-of-town visitors at all football and basketball games. The only thing that was lacking was an adequate number of rooms for those coming from a distance. The completion of the new. hotel now fills this long-felt need so that no one need slay away from any of the big sporting events for fear they will be unable to secure lodging for the night. This hotel also makes it possible for the parents of students at the state university to visit with thjir children amid pleasant surroundings more Often. Bought Site Early In 1928. ; Early in 1928 Mr, Gilliatt purchased from William Graham the site and building of the old Graham hotel for $175,000. One-third of this old building, which was still in very good condition, was wrecked to furnish the its of the new building. A search was then made for ft capable hotel architect and a reliable contractor. Both were found in Indianapolis in the persons of Ross Caldwell, architect for more than sixty hotels in the central states, and Leslie Colvin, one of the leading builders of the state. Financing of the new project was through the City Securities Corporation of Indianapolis through the issuance of !i70,000 of fi per cent, preferred stock and $183,000 of common atock by the newly formed Graham Hotel Realty Company, with Mr. Giaham as president and Mr. Gilliatt as vice president. Plans were immediately drawn for ine of the finest hundred-room hotels to be found any place. The new Abraham Lincoln hotel of Springfield, 111., was used partly as a model together with many novel ideas for the comfort of guests which are original with Mr. and Mrs. Gilliatt and the architect and contractor. Many Features Found. These plans called for an absolutely fireproof eight-story building of reinforced concrete construction with the first two floors of Indiana limestone and the remainder of variegated Brazil face brick with a heavy stone trim. An inspection of the almost completed building recently was a revelation in if many unexpected features. 1 few are (he hotels which are reM built and as finelv furnished as sis one. The dominant tone of architectural treatment throughout is colonial with many of the new colors nicely narmonized. The entrance is from College avenue, th main business street of Bloomington, through wide double doors into a spacious ground floor hall leading into the large banquet room, which will he utilized each week by five luncheon clubs, Rotary, Kiwanis, Exchange, Lions and Stone Club, as tvell as by numerous local and university organizations for banquets and dances. This room is well lighted with crystal chandfliers and candle bracket lights along the walls. The side walls are stenciled over an old rose background, while the ceiling is finished in ivory and fold. Seating Capacity 200. This room must be seen with all the lights aglimmer to be really appreciated. Seating capacity at a banquet is almost two hundred. Immediately off this banquet loom is a ladies rest room and a checkroom? : A survey of the lobby floor is well worth while. Here is found the glimpse of the taste in selecting furnishings, draperies and carpets with which Mrs. Gilliatt has been endowed, for in all these lines her word was final. The lounge is removed a couple of steps up from the business lobby with a terazzo floor covered with rich Wilton rugs. There are davenports and occasional chairs of all types and colors in profusion to harmonize with the green and red predominating tones of the decorations. To one side of the lounge is a large writing room with double desks and green upholstered chairs. Sharing the front of the second floor with the lounge is a large, well appointed dining room with tables of various sizes to seat about one hundred and twenty people. Immediately off this main dining room is a smaller private dining room for parties up to eighteen or twenty, which has extension leaf tables of th home type, special china and special silver for special parties. Kitchen Model of Completeness. Through another door is the large kitchen, which is a model in the completeness of its equipment. Few hotels even twice the size of the Graham have as many labor-saving devices and as sanitary a method of preparing food as is found here. Mr. Gilliatt founded his reputation as a good host on his appetizingly prepared meals and now intends even to improve the high standard which he set years ago Guests are conveyed to rooms on high speed elevator of the latest safety design. Arriving upon any floor guests are confronted with a running ice water drinking fountain for their convenience and a fire hose for safety The inside fire stairs also opens onto this elevator hall. Sit.re this Is an absolutely fireproof building carrying the lowest insurance BUILD GRAHAM HOTEL. Pi I '( I'jnhiiMiiiiirii -i OVK1.TY effects nrvrr before heard on tti air are promised by the Mallory Hatter.;, a new orchestral unit, who inaugurate a series of weekly broadcasts at ? o'clock tonight over WJZ and the NBC ?v?tpm. A special arrangement of "California" will be one of the feature selections that the Columbians will present at 9 o rlnrk tonight in their broadcast over the Columbia system. This number contains sonps coverinc territory from the Kast to the West coast and listeners will be enabled to do lightning traveling from the Atlantic coast to the Pacific, touching upon the high spots of the middle West on the way. A surprise for the radio audience in the form of a selection from a strange, new musical experiment, which has created a furor all over Kurope, will he heard during the Maxwell hour over the NRC system at 8:30 o'clock toniphl. This will be a ultra modern selection in the form of an opera and is known as "Jonny Ppielt Auf." Smw Vtr arvl M:- Trte.rr- 1?:r Th !'l--2f no a;e p'r;pH ,'hn.i;p thptr" ' a q j .-J , ; o P, ' 'hl''.h 'h medium of tpe lid-speW, :e Mi. Tuanene .Niincr. nn..-ir .i;p"v-Mnr of lndnapol:s Teai-her'j: c. "2 : M ' ('jirniyn Avrrs T'ltriT. ; -i n ' f qnrj r.in Kern, radio prjimr f The Indianapons S'ar In arirji-mn to .th" smsers tonish. the or-hestra will b heard m a number of pt ruiar melodies WIM.IAM G RA HAH. PBKSTON f. GILLIATT. rates of anv huilriine in "Rlnominctrin no outside fire escape is required since the inside stairs is more convenient and safer. All hall walls are paneled in bright flowered paper with ivory trim. The halls are all well lighted, both artificially and by windows at either end. M Per Cent Have Baths. All rooms contain toilet and lavatory separate from the sleeping room. Eighty-five per cent of the rooms contain baths. About two-thirds of the baths are tubs with the remainder showers. The two outside corner rooms on each floor have a combination tub and shower bath. All baths have tile floor and tiled walls. All bath fixtures are the highest grade standard make. The bedrooms themselves in their comfort giving features can not be excelled. The corner rooms on each floor are fitted up as parlor bedrooms with large davenport, three easy chairs, writing desk and chaiK bridge lamp and vanity dresser. All rooms have roomy closets with shelves for hats and honks and hangers for suits and dresses. All rooms have four base outlets for auxiliary electric conveniences now carried by most travelers There also is an outlet for attaching a curling iron or similar device in the bathroom. All rooms are equipped with large wall fans for summer weather. The heating system is of the very best, two-pipe steam. Attractive pictures have been selected for the rooms. Mr. Gilliatt will continue as the proprietor and will be assisted by Winthrop Walker Williams in the capacity of assistant manager and auditor. This opening for business Monday precedes by some two or three weeks the formal opening of the hotel. The j exact date will be announced later by the sending of hundreds of invitations. COLUMBIA CLUB OLD-TIMERS ENJOY ANNUAL STEAK DINNER Marching clubs, the political spellbinder and the torchlight parade3 of long ago were revived and reminis-cently reviewed for a moment by "old-timers" of the Columbia Club last night. The occasion was the annual beefsteak dinner given by the club in honor of those who have been members of the organization twenty-five years or more. About fifty of the old members were seated together, and provided a part of the program by chatting among themselves about the "good old days" of political campaigns. Leslie Special Guest, Governor Harry G. Leslie was a special guest. He praised the work of the Columbia Club, paid tribute to the older members and entertained with humorous -stories. Clarence L. Sweeney of Brown county gave a selection of humorous impersonations. Martin Hugg. who spoke on hehalf of the twenty-five-year members, recalled events leading to organization of the Benjamin Harrison Marching Club and formation of the Marion and Columbia clubs. He also reviewed the careers of deceased members of the early Republican organizations who achieved fame in j their respective endeavors. Mr. Hugg asked younger members nf the Columbia Club to "continue to bring full honors to yourself and the club." Asa J. Smith was toastmaster. Wallace O. Lee was chairman of the committee on arrangements, assisted by Ernest Krutzsch. L. R. Carson and Harry Boggs. Approximately three hundred persons attended, including about fifty of the "old-timers." Quartet Furnishes Music. The Pullman Porters Quartet of Chicago, Miss Mickey McShane, Miss Arabelle Chambers and Arnold Peek and his band provided a musical and dance program. Following the addresses, members listened to a radio broadcast of the Sharkey-Stribling fight at Miami, Fla. Several boxing bouts closed the evening's entertainment. The guests wore costumes consisting of a butcher's white apron and cap. Large steaks prepared from prize-winning cattle were served. The following lines were read by the toastmaster as expressive nf sentiment held by the younger members of the club for the older men: "Tn those oldtimers who are here, We pray their God above them. Grants every wish and hope, that's dear. To them and thore who love them." A telegram from Norman A. Perry, president of the club, expressing regret at being unable to attend the dinner, was read. Mr. Perry is in Florida. HOOVER SYMPATHETIC TOWARD CONSOLIDATION OF RAILROADS (In this, the ninth of a scries of twelve dispatches, David Lawrence gives an outline of the policy of the Hoover administration concerning railroads. In succeeding dispatches ho will discuss other topics, sketching the bases of action in the new administration.) nv D.vvii) ; WASHINGTON', Feo. "-'7. -Herbert I Hoover is friendly toward the idea of railway consolidation. Up to now the interstate commerce commission has hesitated to approve any particular plan, while Congress in turn has been inclined to await the action of the commission. Mr. Hoover will have it In his power to reconstitute the interstate commerce commission. At least five vacancies will occur within his administration and he has the opportunity to reappoint those who are disposed to favor consolidation and tn bring in new members who will be inclined, to conform. The railroads themselves have been trying to bring about voluntary consolidation. Four years ago there was more agitation for it than there is today. But with the known interest of Herbert Hoover in the elimination of waste, it is quite probable that some form of consolidation will be. brought about under the Hoover administration if the railroads themselves can agree upon a plan. The policy of Mr. Hoover toward railway transportation is expressed thus in his own words: Enumerates Views. "If I were to attempt to express my personal views of such national policies stripped of secondary considerationsI would enumerate them somewhat in the following terms: "1. Railway service under private ownership in order to secure the driving force of individual initiative in efficency and development. "2. Government regulaton of fair rates and railway finance in order to protect the shipper and to give stability to honest, investment of'sav-ings. "3. Recapture nf excess profits In order to allow rates which will assure operation and service from railways in less favored circumstances yet prevent unjustified profits from any particular railways. "4. The earliest practicable consolidation of the railways into larger systems under conditions of maintained competition in service in order to secure greater economy in operation, assurance of development and lower rates, and greater stability in earnings. Co-Operation Vital. "5. A basis of employer and employe relationship that will stimulate mutual responsibility as the first requisite to continuous service. "6 Reorganization of the rate structure in order to secure a better j adjustment of the burden between i commodity, class and less than car-load rates, most of which can best ; be accomplished after consolidation j and consequent wider diversification of traffic. ' "7. Co-operation between the shipper and the railways in order to se- j cure a better distribution nf traffic over the year and to avoid rnnges- ' tion of peak periods of car shnrtages. "8. Definite development nf relief in freight terminals, including co- ', ordination with motor truck feeders ; and distribution. I i ' n....i a - - l.ut ' .AWItKNCK. rates and service by water and rail transportation in order to relieve extension of railways where unnecessary and give the public the advantage of cheaper water transport." Optimist About V. S. Mr. Hoover is an optimist about the future of America and this include., the outlook for the American railroads. Recent discussions as to the power of the interstate commerce commission to adjust, inequalities between different tpgions through the fixing of coal rales are hound to challenge Mr. Hoover's attention, ihough in the main he probably will keep hands off the commission when he has once appointed men in whose judgment and capacity he has absolute confidence. The general expectation now is that Mr. Hoover will give far more attention to the economic abilities nf his prospective appointees to positions that affect business tha he will to purely political phases. Vuile the pressure for political appointments i3 going to be as intense as ever, Mr. Hoover's strength with public opinion arises from his understanding of economic problems. (Copyright, 1929. All rights reserved.) (Tomorrow's dispatch will deal with radio and communications.) Parties Meetings. Th Aid Society of the Prncrenslve Spir illa 1st Churcn win nnid a nuhiie mi-me a?p service from 2 until 4 n'riock lhi afternoon al the home nf Mra. .1. G. Srhlotter. 2225 North Talhott street. A benefit ('arrt party will he helrl by Magnolia Circle No 4 at 2 n'riock tomorrow afternoon In Red Mens hall. Mnm and Ie street. Revival serviced are being held each nleht at the Rood Samaritan Mission. I.'ix North Noble street. The services, whlcn will continue tnrou?hnut the cnmlnr week, are helne conducted by fenrge Carlisle of Mt. Vernon, III. 7:00 Serenade; Rparkera. 8 :rtO Singers , House Concert. :0nold Counselor; Fecial. 10 :0O News: Orchestra. in.,10 Slumber Music; Orchestra. 12 :00 Insomnia Club. tare. s 'Mi-Aunt and Tncle. I s.30 Phonograph f'rncram; ; Columbians. 9 in - Musical Episode, in nn-Fnrt Wavne. Hour. :nn-- Feature; cert. I House Con- I (iy the Astnrialfd Prr.f Programs in Central standard time. All time is p. m. unless otherwise indicated. Wavelengths on left of call letters, kilocycles on right. !M.t KIW, Chicago 10211.' 7 OH Hrmemakers; Fea- t 7 Oil Velma Iwis: Music. .1:30 I'nele Boh. S:(W Orchestra; Organ. .174. KTHS. Hnl Springs son. ( no-Orchestra; Favorite Ssfl.t KFAR. Lincoln 71ft. ;V) organist , ' News; . on Concert Orchestra.. Orchestra. 7 ;i)0 Plymouth Church ;11 .00. nrchest ra Hour. , r.rm-. i . ! SM.H-WHA". Iulsllle 370.1 VHTO. Minneapolis- am St. Panl-aw. , n rtlnner Concert; i 7 nn Hvmn Singing: Senil- ST. SIMON lrINTFT WINS. I WASHINGTON. Ind. Fen :7 - The S ' S-mon Tjuinte nf Wa).h!nctnn dfa'ed t. ; Jsper ardrmv rnurf team 2 10 hee : 'a.t night The winners he;d at lt-io-in i !d at the haif. SERVICE TO MARION Two fait. .teeUar train. M.ox FiAFM-r"" throllKh Hhont rh.l-Vtnln4;anar"A daily. 1 1e - M arion IndiannP0"' l :.oo " arrivioft 1 . nn . M. irl Marion M " SW.4 W'BBM, Chlra 7J. g 00 WABC Programs t: houra). 10:00 Royal Canadians; VoLal. 11:00 Old Gray Mara Club .l.m.mh tram Fs'. leave poll 1:00- a K.V 1 ,! 7 SO Musical: Craftsmen j 5 00 Singers: 1 j" r nijiMJS' a po rmsrwii. cert 9. no Sam' Pianist; Tht- 0 no Old 'Counselor. atncai Hour. 9.3(1 News: Banio Buddies. House Con- 344.8 WF.NIl, Chicago S70. 7:15 Farmer Rusk. 11:00 Late Evening Features. 4U.4 WON-H'I.IB, JI0 6:00 Circus; Nighthawks; Knsemhle. 7:00 Radio Floorwalker. 7:30 Sentinels. 8:00 Kadlo Feature. 8:30 Vocal; Musical Melange. 9:30 Entertainers. 10:20 Long s Orchestra. 21(1.1 KMOX. St. nl 1:00 Talk; F.nsemhle; . Talk. ; 7 00 WABC Programs (3 Chicago hours 1. 11i:oiJ Amos-Anay; niova League. 10:20 Col. Courtesy; Orchestra. 21.1 KVOO, Tnlsa 1140. 9:00 Old Counselor; Feature. j 10:30 Orchestra: Organ. 10:00 Features; Popular (2 r.ANi r,B.. houra). i 4,14.3 WKAF. New York 344. WI.K, Chicago 870. 6:05 Livestock Service. 8:30 Short Features. 7:30 Talk; Church Quartet. 8:00 Tire Hour. 9:00 Hatters; Music. 10:00 Concert Orchestra. 447.5 VM At). Chicago 870. .1:15 Topsy Tuny; Orches tras. 7:00 Lecture; Whitney Trio 7:30 Health: VaJ. Gen. Malone. 8:00 Sleepy Program; Minstrels 9:no The Four; Momence C. of C 10:00 Amoa; Orchestra; Stock Exchange. 11:00 Dance Music (3 hours 1 . Sentinels apid Tran- 880 7:00 Song Shop: 8:00 8inRers; Kl sit. 9 00 Old Counselor. 9:30 Dance Music tlVi hours 1. 34.8 WJK, New York 788.! ; 7:00 Serenade: Sparkers. t 00 NeaDolitan Nights. Mai lt. 30 House Concert ters. V 9-30 SlxteenPmcer. 10:00 Slumber Hour. 422.3 WOH, Newark 718. 7:00 Merrymakers. 7.30 WOR Stock Company, s 00 Concerto: Musical Overtones 1:00 Little Svmnhony. 10.00 News; Dance Hour. 348.8 WABC. New York 880. 7 ;00 United Opera Company. 8:00 Aunt and Uncle. n op rnliimhhni' F.niKnde 5:2Ii ?l,tor,!;al WRhllRhti. io;00 Dance Hour. 10;O0 Slumber Hour. 481.3 WSM. Nashville 8.18. 8 :00-Orchestra: Newarast- Ing. 8:30 studio: Cralg'a Orchestra. 7:30 Sentinels; Singers. 8:30 Hcuse Conrert. 9 00 Chocolate Hour. 9 30 Man Who Knowi. 10:00 Orchestra. 352.7 WWI New Orleans 8.10. 9:00 Musical Features. 285 WOAI, Snn Antonio 1 100. 8:00 Organ Hour; Recital. 8:30 Hank Program. 9:00 Old Counselor. 3.1!. 7 KWKII. Shreveport 8.10. 10:00-Two Hours of Music. WKSTKBN. 381.2 KOA. Denver 8.10. 7.0O- Song Shop; Reese Trio. 8:00 Singers; House Con-cert. 9:00 Counselor; Extension Service. 488.5- KF1. l.os Angeles 840. 8.00 Singers. Old Man Opportunity. 9 30 Symphony, Feature Hour 11:30 Concert Orchestra. 12.00 Dance Music. 285.5 KNX. Iit Angeles 1050. 9:00 Musical Features 7:00-Serenade; Sparkers. . ,1.T" , VT , ,.hh V :2riiour,"i K!''""''-R:00-Vocal: House Concert.! 305.9 KDRA. Plttshnrgh 11.00-Hour of Music. .. I 319.5 KOO, Oakland 790. 8:00 Neapolitan: nouaa Concert. n-no Unttiri' TtaHioet. S80.S-WTAM-WKAR, Cleve-!i0.00Dance. ' Marion for Indiflnar Bl7.;0A.M.uid-V'F.'-Other fast, convenient ceamct every hour. rL.nt. .t Ar.der.on. , ...u en-ice to of larU ;;.., For full from information call Riley :'01, Fravel's Trivial Troubles nftontimos needlessly destroy much nf tbe pleasure of a cruise or tour. The traveler faring forth on a trip in America or abroad will insure the utmost of pleasure and profit from her journey if she will enlist the services of the Union Trust Travel Bureau. Then ALL the details of her trip will be taken care of all accommodations arranged for BEFORE she leaves. And. there will be nothing: to do but thoroughly enjoy every minute. This service is, of course, without additional cost. May we not help you arrange your next trip? nitlinfl A. Kurtz. Manager Travel Bureau, "The Lending Travel Bureau of Indianapolis." TRUST- f5?' 120 E. Market Street Riley 5U41 ronomlcal WJf 438.3 tVUT, Cincinnati 1 700 9:00 Hattera tal. 10:30 Jack Little lnstrumen- Dance. 6:00 Musical Featurea. 7:00 Song Shop; Sentinels. 8:00 Singers; Trio. 9:00 Radloet; Danca Music, 790. 8:00 S'ngers; With tha Jonses. 9:0001(1 Counselor; Band 10:30 Organ Recital. SOl'THKBN. 405.2 WsSB, AUanln 740. 8:00 Orchestra. S99.8 WHO, Pes Molncs 1000. R:,'i0 Studio Program. 7:00 Song Shop: Sentinels. 8:00 Sinters; House Con-1 7:00 Musical: Sentinels. cert. I 8:00 Singers; House Con 9:00 Old Counselor; Enter- cert. talners. ; (t;lin Old Counselor. 10:00 Dance; Symphony ;0:45 Organ Recital. Orchestra.. : 2navAri. Birmingham 38.8 WTX-WJft, Detroit I " '" 750. j 8:00 Children's Cluh; 8:00 Sin.. -rs; Bert Harwell. 8:45 Agriculture Program. 9:30 Symphony Hour. lane; xnrec 7:00 Serenade; Rparkers 8:00 Radloet ; House Con cert. 9:00 Hatters. 9 :.in Readings: Orchestra. 10:00 N'ewg; Amos; Orchestra. 10:30 Theater Orgsn; Dance. nrcn"irn. I 7;r,o Musi" Snidv cluh. ' 288.3 KRI.r), Dallas lt" ! 9 00-WABC Programs. .11:00 Music; Orchestra. 288. : FAA. rtallaa 1040. 8:00 Soldiers: Vocal. 7:00 Serenade: Sentinels. 8:O0 Farm Program: 1 Jubilee. 1 8:00 Organist; Orchestra. Bovs 12:00 nance Music (2 hours). 80:.l K4R, Seattle 970. 10:00 Sketch and Music (3 hoursi. 1:00a- Dance Hour. 285.3 RSI.. Sail Lake City 1130 8:00 Singers; Music. 9:llli Instruction- Music. 10:00 Musical Programs. 110.9 KPO, San Francisco K(I. 8:00-!!incers: Vocal. 9:00 Talk: Sports; Recital. 10:00 - Musical Programs. 3(19.1 K-IK, Kealtle 970. V'lO Noveitv; Phonograrh Program. 9:00 Columbians; Musical Features. 10:00 Sketch and Music (3 j hoursi. 3M.t KOB. !lst College 1180. 8:30- Vor(,l; Fann Vloltn 9 00 -Hawaiian; Farm: 1 Dan-:e. CHICAGO $ 4.00 CHAIN PROGRAMS. WKAF AND NETWORK. 10:15 A. M Radio Household Institute KKKX. WTAM, WWJ, W&AI. KSD, WHAS, 7:00 P. M. Song Shop, WEEI. WTIC. WJAR, WlAG, WCSH, WFI, WRC, WGY. WCAE, WTAM, WWJ, KSD, WHO. WOW, WDAF, WTMJ, KOA, KSTP 7:30 P. M. Hoover Sentinels, WEEI, WFI, WRC, WGY, WOR, WCAK, WTAM. WWJ, WGN. KSD. WHO, WOW, WDAF, WFAA, WHAS, WSM, WSB, WBT, WKY, KSTP. , 8:00 P. M. Selberllng Singers, WEM, WTIC, WJAR, WTAG. WCSH, WKI, WRC. WGY. WGR. WCAE. WTAM. WWJ. KYW, KSD. WHO, WOW, WDAF, WFAA. JPRC. WHAS, I WSM. WSB. WBT.'WJAX. WTMJ. KSTP, KOA, KPO, KCO, KF1, KG W. KlIMO, KHtf. WKY. 8:30 P. M Rapid Transit. W'l IC. WCSH, WRC, WCAE. WJAR. WKI. v 9:00 P. M. -Halsey Stuart Hour, WEEI. WTIC, WJAR. WTAG. WCSH, WKI. WRC. WGY, WGR. WCAE. WWJ. ,KYW. KSD. WHO. WOW, KVOO. WFAA. KPRC. WOAI, WHAS, : WSB, WBT, WTMJ. KOA, KSTP. 9:30 P .M. Palais D Or Orchestra, WFI, j WWJ, WRVA. WTIC. WGY. WHO. 10:00 P. M. Ben Bernle's Hotel Roosevelt 1 Orchestra, WHO. WOW. WRVA. Wit. AND KTWORK. 9:00 A. M. Br. Royal S. Copeland Hour, KDKA. WI.W, WJR. KFKX. 10:00 A. M Forecast Radio School of Cookerv. KDKA, WJR. WLW. 1 7:00 P. M. --Serenade, WBZ. WB'.A. 1 WBAI., WHAM. KDKA. WJR. 1 WI,W. KYW. KWK. WREN, WFAA, KPRC. WOAI WKY. i 7:30 P. M. --Champion Sparkers with Walter O'Keefe, WBZ. WBZA, WBAI,. WHAM. KDKA. WJR. WLW, KYW. KWK. 8:00 P. M. Nenpolltan Nlghls 8:30 P. M. Maxwell Concert, WBZ. WBZA. WBAL. WHAM. KIKA. WJR. WLW. KYW. KSD WDAF. KSTP, WTMJ, WEBC. WHAS, WSM. WMC, WSB. WBT. KPRC. KOA. WHO. WOW. W.IAX. WBAP, WRVA. 9:00 P. M. Correct Time. WBZ. WBZA WBAL. WHAM. KDKA, WJR, WLW. KYW. 9:00 P. M Mallorv Hatters. WPZ. WBAL, WHAM. KDKA, WJR, WLW. KWK. WLK. WREN. . 9:30 P. M. The Sixteen Singers. WKY. 10:00 P. M. Slumber Music, WKY. CHICAGO NBC MTl DIOR. 12:00 M. Farm snd Home Hour, WLW, KPKX. WHAS. COLUMBIA SVSTEM. 7:00 P. M. United Opera Company, KOIL, WABC. KMOX. 8:00 P. M.-Aunt Jemima. WABC. WADC, WBBM. WOWO. KMOX. KOIL 8:30 P. M Sonora Hour, WABC, KOIL, WBBM. WOWO, KMOX, WHK, WCCO. 9:00 P. M. The Columbians. WAKC, WKRC, WBBM. WOWO, KMOX. KOIL. 9:30 P. M -Musical Enisode. WABC. WKRC, WGHP, WBBM. WOWO, KMOX. KOIL. LOCAL STATIONS. WFBM (1 230-243.8. 7 to ft A. M Pep Unlimited Club. 10:30 A. M. Aunt Sammy's hour. 11:00 A. M. Fuller-Fyde morning mu-slcale. 12:00 Noon Lenten services from Kob- erts Park church. 12:30 V. M. Jack and Gene, happy harmony boys. 12:45 P. M. Farm period. 4:30 P. M. Studio orchestra. 5:00 P. M. Children's knowledge. 8:15 P. M. Record program. 5:30 P. M. Chapter a day from the New Testament. 5:45 P. M. What's happening; late news; newscastlng. 8:00 P. M. Lonsines time; weather forecast. 8:00 to ::i( IV M.- Silent. 6:30 P. M. - Morrison's musical scrap tXKlk. 7:00 P. M - Pluto radio review. 8:00 to 10:00 P. M . - Silent. 10:00 P. M.-Dame music from Indiana ballroom. 10:30 P. M. linsines time; weather forecast: the columnist, Indianapolis Star. 10:45 P. M. Jack and Gene, happy harmony boys. 10:00 A 10;). A 10:25 A WK M. 10:30 A. M -I 10:40 A. 5:00 P 8:00 P. 8 15 P. 8 30 P. 7:00 P. 8 :00 P. 8:15 P. 8:30 V. 9:00 P. 10:00 P. 10:30 P. M UK 11400-214.2). Recipe exchange. Studio program. Interesting hits of history. rourtesv of Indianapolis iiihllc llbrarv. , e stock and grain mar. krt; weather and shippers forecast. WKBF shopping service. Late news bulletins and sports. safety nrorram hv Lieut. Frank Owen -Hoosler Motor Club. Dinner concert Indianapolis Athletic Chin. -Studio program. -Hoosler State. Auto Association. -The girl friends. Kroeer Grocerv boyi. Studio program. -Stile" Collegians. the. Hoosier Athletic Cluh nr- Indianapous Atnieuc i-iuo. 6.00 5.00 4.9S 3.50 3.00 5.00 8.09 15.00 18.00 45.00 DETROIT TOLEDO EVANSVILLE LOUISVILLE CINCINNATI .... ST. LOUIS PITTSBURGH WASHINGTON . . . NEW YORK LOS ANGELES MIAMI 32.00 Wherever business or pleasure calls, you can get there comfortahly, safely and at lower cost on a Greyhound bus. All buses are hot-water heated and well ventilated by the scientific Tropic-Aire System. Deep pneumatic cushioned individual seats, hydraulic shock absorbers and oversize tires make riding easy. Fares save you many dollars on every trip. Tickets and information at depots. Traction Terminal Bus Depot Illinois and Market Sts.. Phone Riley 4501 Downtown Ticket Office, Claypool Hotel lit West Washington Street Phone LINCOLN 2222 famous susicians a THE ROAD OF UNUSUAL SERVICE - when you plan California trip Lft u help tou. Supfjestions, based upon personal knowledge of the West, will enable you to travel far more eomfortably and eco-nomirallr. Famous (IHuxe trains to serve you Golden Slate Limited, Apache, Rocky Mountain Limited. W ide choice of routes scenery varied from palm-shaded oases of Arizona's deserts to the inspiring grandeur of the Colorado Rockies. Vorv Low One Way Fares Tickets good only In coaches and chair cars March 15 to April 30 Reduced excursion tickets for Pullman or roach travel on sale daily. For details, phone or mail confirm belnw ROCK ISLAND J F. Powers, Durriet Pnicnier Aenl (521-Rj Rock Islaad Linei.615 Merehuls Bank Buildial Phone Lincoln 559 Indianapolis, Ind. Pleas send dee booklets deseriptiTe of California and Heaaa enroot. One War Round Trip (check far daird trom Jo California, and adria r near dial train chedalei and seme. j Name Address 16 to entertain Yc program tonight. The final audition hours and five more will be on the will be held March 14. Preliminary audition winners are Miss Thelma E. Caldwell, Miss Alma Marie Pettijohn, Miss Marguerite Carrying out a tradition of many years, recitals by eminent artists will be held each Saturday evening of March, in the Vernon Room. The following soloists will appear: CHICAGO f; Y A ORTH WESTERN . w RAILWAY UNION PAOFDC will IFARE foGI onous Clark's Famous Cruises UnnWAV AND WIITI1N NUHWAI MEDlTtaaAMBAM Crtslaa, 1 aya. to 11M "Lancattrta" sailing Juna 29 Spain, Tangier. Algiers, Italy, Rl-Forty-one applications havo heon ytTA Sweden, Norway, Edinburgh, receiver! by the Morrison's Fashion 1 rrn..,. Rerlin iPnris Lnnrlon). ctle I'Jh irhQ,rna Mario, So- the most pleasing feminine sincing i "'tiTii.Ji.at.tl,OOi , pr: Kverett Marshall, Ran voire in Inrtianspolis mis series. l;,.,., Kvsex. DVJO .Mitltlle lrhe tone; Alberto Salvi, Harpist. KQJU March 2nd Frieda Hempel, t Soprano; Erna Rubenstein, ! Sfff V'wlin'nt; Donald Pirnie, Rari- gLaSSTTuLis March Dth Giuseppe de I.uea, ! V Rarilnne; Emma Otero, Coloratura Soprano; Paul Koclianski, J'iolinist. Of O Y vtt rpnTi n NEVADA AN0 UTAH Woodruff flare, Indianapolis en orchestral nrocram. is broadcast I hv the local station at n:.".0 o'clock i Frank C. (.'lark. Times llldu. each Thursday evening. Fifteen : voices have been heard during these n. y Varch 23rrl Anna Case, Soprano; Joseph Macpherson, Rait; Margaret Shot well, Ptanift. Used EaaMoc All In Good Condition J20 to 60 See Our Window for Some Real Bargains SMITH-HASSLER-STURM CO. 219-221 Mass. Ave. 116 E. Ohio St. JinII0J; Aarch 30th Richard Crooks, irl I Tenor; Carolina Scgrera, So- .rvAl prano; .Walter Giesekinz, from INDIANAPOLIS n- (foul to TIT Steamer to IXewOmeaisjs A ,TAMPA Ckound Vrip OjUtta- $70.85 Including nwala and berth aboard atamer rsii ' i.rrv 11 Pianitt. Reservations for the complete j I series should be made at once. Ur, if you prefer, you may attend individual concerts, coming down for a shorter visit. . . . There are ample garage facilities at The comfortable and convenient route to Florida it via New Orleans to Tampa i Chalfonte-Haddon Hall. aDoard the tteamihip Comal sailing ' every Saturday noon. Splendid connec- i t t rTrrn tionaatTampaforSt-Petersburg.Uke- VHALl',Ui 1 b" land, Orlando, Miami and all Florida. (INK, MAY s:.40 For rara from other point9nnuft your oca ticxer tfrnt or nrldrmtt Gulf & Southern Steamship Co. in; ranl Rank RMi. New Orleans. I. HADDON HALL ATLANTIC CITY American Finn FROM Indianapolis OneWay Coach Excursion Tickets on Sale Daily Marcli 15 to April 30 Take advantage ot this drastic reduction in fares. Tickets good in chair cars and coaches only on all trains carrying such equipment to any terminal or en route point in California. Nevada or Utah. Baggage checked. Children half fare. For romplrtm Information, ath cnic.4.r;n a north western union pciFir: Meridian St., or 70S- IWsie Tprminal Indianapolis. InH. Phone RUej 3110 BIH.. Fourth and alnut Sttnu Cincinnati. Ohln I46-D ..... Lowest Fares Since DSPO a

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