Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas on September 25, 1937 · Page 2
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

Hope Star from Hope, Arkansas · Page 2

Publication:
Location:
Hope, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Saturday, September 25, 1937
Page:
Page 2
Start Free Trial
Cancel

Star If "lister o* Hope M»: Prea*, 1S». Consolidate.". January 18,19». '„>: 0 Justice Ddiwf fhv HerdU t^. False Report! W'W Published tPHliy Wtk*<iHf afternoon by Star Publishing Co., Inc. f «K M. Palmer & Atex, H. tW*burn), at The Star building, 812*214 South street, Hop*, ' C. *. PALMER, President ALEX. R. WASfflJURN, Editor and Publisher (AP) —-Means Associated Press (NBA)—Means Newspaper Enterprise Ass*n. Rate (Always Payable in Advance): By city carrier, per ISc] per month 65c; one year $6.50. By mail, in Hempstead, Nevada, \ Miller and Lafayette counties, $3.50 per year; elsewhere $6.50. Member •( Ht« Associated Pre.«: The Associated Press is exclusively io th« use for repubUcation of all news dispatches credited to it ot credited in this paper and also the local news published herein. Cftorgtts ert Tributes, Eie.: Charges- will be made for all tributes, cards thanks, resolutions, or memorials, concerning the departed. Commercial hold to this policy in the news columns to protect their readers \t/t ot spate-taking memorials. The Star disclaims responsibility the s«rfe-k*eping or return of any unsolicited mativiscripts. Tax Truths as Brake on Public Spending on the theory that what you don't see doesn't hurt you. our American legislators have succeeded, since war, in building up one of the most amazing systems of taxes ever erected on the planet. The result is that the tax collector manages to gouge the out of the little fellow without ever drawing a word Protest Indeed* the little fellow seems to like it. One of his fav- 'orite diversions is to compare his lot with that of his opposite lumber in Great Britain, where taxes are as visible as cigarette billboards. He looks over the figures and discovers that [v/the Bdton has to start paying an income tax as soon as his ——-— amount to $750 a year—which takes in practically The American doesn't start until his income S1000; if he is married, he can earn as much as before he has to lay anything on the line, o, looking at the figures, the American pities the poof; 4^S|iton as one who is taxed within an inch of his life, and IfftMnks his God that in this country it is the rich man who Upays the taxes. Which is precisely where the American fools himself. XXX' T. FLYNN pointed out the other day that an ordinary : American with an income of $4000 a year will pay some '" in income taxes, after he has made the proper deductions, with an income half that size may pay no income at all— ; but if he buys one package of cigarettes a day he a tax of $21.90 a year, and if he has a couple of daily of beer, in addition, his tax will run to $45. The $28 income tax may cause the citizen to kick like a 1 steer. The almost equally heavy tax he pays for the privilege of smoking ^cigarettes causes no kick at all. because he doesn't realize that he is paying it. It is invisible, and therefore painless. , i If these hidden'cigarette and beer taxes were the only 1 ones, it wouldn't be so bad. But they are just a small part of the,picture. For the plain fact is that 70 per cent of the taxes C^T; collected in this country are of the invisible variety. There |!"arfi gasoline .taxes, cosmetics taxes, taxes of innumerable glands on retail sales, doubly hidden taxes deriving from the fe^ tariff—until, .according to the Twentieth Century Fund's rep, 1 cent study, a ISTew York wage earner who makes $1000 a year 1; ,has to pay $123 of it in taxes. ,; x x x . .-..; • ' . U to Collect that $123 from the wage earner as a direct tax and he will howl to high heaven. Collect it indirectly >and he never sees it — and, consequently, never -utters a peep. We need a day-by^ay. educational program about these taxes of ours. The ordinary citizen is paying for today's spending program, and paying right through the nose. If he once realized the fact, he would begin to apply pressure that would cut the spending program down to a reasonable size. law Critics Are Hit by President Roosevelt Flays "Lip Service"—Hopes to Stay Out of War CASPER, Wyo. — (/P) - President Roosevelt said Friday that "eonstitu* tional government in this country is succeeding despite obstacles being placed in its way by those who do not want to see it Work." He said the government could get along without those who give "lip service" to objectives by opposing methods of attaining them. "That type of' person has less in- lUence in our government today than >ver before in pur history,' 1 he said n a rear'jjiatform talk after a drive htrough this Central Wyoming town. Democratic processes of government can meet emergencies, the president said. Unless those emtrgencies are met, he added, uncrtainties and fears are likely' to result, as they did in 1933. Fears result, too, in dictatorial governments, he declared. Mr. Roosevelt said he was sure the rank and file of people in the United States approved "the objectives" of their government. "Yes. the country is thinking nationally," he said. "We are not only acting but thinking in national terms. Sv. Hat-Checking Costs I F you like to think .of yourself and your fellow Americans as ", sturclv and independent people, consider the case of the New York gentleman who. buying a new hat, set out to keep! track of the money it" would cost him. in tips to hat check girls in restaurants, theaters, and night clubs. In one month, he .discovered, this hat cost him exactly $9 — and the hat coat only a dollar in the first place ! The only difference between this New Yorker and the rest of us is that we don't go around quite so much. When we ; do get around, we pay the hat check girl meekly and without . thought of protest. Yet -the hat check racket is a petty graft • that only a completely house-broken people would put up with. It certainly ought to be up to the proprietor of a place , pf public entertainment to give his patrons a place to put their hats, and to give it tq.them for nothing. If we were half •as sturdily indenendent^ we like to think we are, we would never put up with the present system. mmm m* «g i$% « The Family Doctor T. U. Rtf. V. 8. Pat. Off. By DK. MOBUI5 F1SHBEIN KHItor. Journal o* the American Medical Association, and of Hygeia, the Health Magazine. Cancer Type Differs in Men, Women; Study Proves Disease Not Contagious This js the seventh in a series by Dr. Morris Fishbein In which he 'discusses the types of cancer, its effect on the body, and measures for prevention and cure. (No. 328) The question has been raised as to . the types of cancer which occur in men and in women. In women, the breast and the uterus seem to be the spots chiefly affected. Cancer of the breast occurs in men only about one in a hundred as compared with cases among women. Cancer of the stomach is more frequent in men but cancer of the gallbladder occurs four times as often in women. Cancers of the lips .tongue and mouth are found much more frequently in men than in women. This has been related largely to the practice of smoking. Men have in the past smoked much more often than women. Moreover, women are much more like]y to keep their teeth and mouths clean •than are men. In Ceylon, India, cancer of the mouth Is five times as frequent among the natives as among the white people who live under the the same conditions. It has been suggested that cancer Bu'ght be contagious. Recent investigations have shown, however, that contagion is impossible. There are no jeeorda of surgeons who caught cancers of the band from operatiAg on people who had cancer. There is no proof that cancer is a germ disease. True, it is possible to transplant a cancer from one rat to another. In such cases, however, it is first necessary to inoculate at least lOfl animals to obtain three or four growths from a cancer and it is necessary to irritate the tissues exceedingly to stimulate them to cancer growth. Moreover, it is not possible to transfer a cancer from a human being to any animal or from any animal to a human being. The cancer from a white mouse can be transferred to another white mouse but not to a wild black mouse. Because of the general fear of cancer, all sorts of wild stories have been circulated about "cancer houses" or "cancer districts" in which most of the people are said to suffer from this disease. Investigations have been made of such places but scientific study has ;hown there is nothing to this belief Some districts have more cancer deaths than others because the younger ieople have gone away from these places and only the old people remain. Just because they are eld, more of them die of cancer. NEXT—Irritation as a cause ot taucer. •• » •• .He was just so darn mean I had to shoot him.—Andrew Buck, 83, Racine, Wis., explaining why he peppered his son-in-law with buckshot. Japan evidently is irked because Dhina failed to heed the machine gun typewriting .on the Wall. The value of developing a hobby is illustrated by circus aerialists who often have little to fall back on when they lose their grip on the job. . It's all right for the government to start the business cycle upgrade, but it ought to make some of the handlebar riders pump. Meet at Munich Europe Awaits Word Of Conversation Between Two Dictators , MUNICH, Germany - (IP) — Benito Mussolini and Adolf Hitler met Saturday for the second time in their spectacular careers. Europe tensely aw'aited the result of their rendezvous. The first few hours of their visit were devoted to social activities. Serious "brass tack" conversations of the two men either Were sandwiched into the nine-hour program in Munich or were postponed until later. That is a statement with which only hose who ore blindly partisan will disagree." He made his extemporaneous talk after a motor trip to Fort Casper, a pioneer landmark restored by a WPA project. In a brief appearance at Wendover, ,Wyo., Mr. Roosevelt earlier had said his first word of the trip about international affairs. "Are we going to stay out of the war?" shouted some one in the crowd. "I hope so," Mr. Roosevelt replied. ."One reason I can't make this trip any longer is the international situation. The international situation is not so good and I don't dare stay away from Washington too long." . . •• •» The waters of the Echo river, in Mammoth Cave, Ky., abound in several species of eyeless fish, as well as blind crawfish, flies, beetles, and spiders. An unknown trader first brought the peanut to America in the 18th century. Today it is a major crop in Virginia, where it first was planted in the United States. Camden, DeQueen, Jonesboro, Ely thVille and Walnut Ridge Winners of Grid Tilts Camden Runs Wild to Pile Up 52 to 6 Score Against Nashville—DeQueen Is Hard Pushed to Score 20 to 13 Victory Over Horatio CAMDEN — Scoring eight touchdowns in the first three quarters, the Caraden Panthers defeated Nashville's Scrappers, 52-to 6, before 1,500 fans here Friday night. It -was the worst defeat a Camden team ever gave Nashville. Nashville did not make a first down until late in the fourth period, when Coach Sam Coleman had sent in his second team. In that period Arbold passed to Edwin for a 34-yeard gain and a touchdown for Nashville's only score. Camden scored soon after the game opened when Stern plunged over after Kizzia had passed 35 yards to Blah-. Then Kizzia scored again a few minutes later from the four-yard line after recovering a fumble. The Panthers made two more in the second period. Kizzia and Collins scored two touchdowns each and Stern, Blair, Langley and Gillespie made one each. Camden made 22 first down and completed 10 passes for 222 yards. It was Camden's 4 second victory, Nashville's first defeat in three games. Camden will play Monroe, La., here next Friday night. HORATIO, Ark.—The De Queen Leopards were forced to extend them- selves to their utmost to eke out a » to 13 victory over the Horatio UbfiS who held them scoreless for the first half and came from behind twice in the Second hatf to tie the scot* here Friday afternoon. The Leopards scored early in the third quarter when ttondrickSj halfback, broke through for 32 yards and a touchdown, The place kick for ptirtt failed. Horatio tied the score n few minutes later with a 29. yard pass, Griffin to Sargent, to the fie Queen one yard line. Griffin carried the ball over but a plunge for the extra point failed. De Queen scored agnin when they recovered a Horatio fumble on the lat- tcr's 25 and completed two passes for the distance, Gardner, end, carrying the ball over and Hendricks adding the point. The Lions added their second touchdown by passes to Bourns 'and Sargent to put,the ball on De Queen's one yard line from where Bourns carried it over and Griffin added the point with a line play to again tie the score 13-all. The deciding touchdown was made by the Leopards in the final period On a lateral pass play, Aubrey, quarterback, going over ond Hendricks place, kicking for the point. Poole at end and Pe?k at center were outstanding for Hr/ratlo. Hendricks and Aubrey, qup.rterback, were consistent ground gainers for the visitors. The downs were even at nirie each. Joncsboro Whip Trojans JONESBORO—The Jonesboro . High School Golden Hurricane scored a 19- to-0 victory over the Hot Springs Trojans here Friday night, their first over Hot Springs in six years. Jonesboro began its attack in the opening period but lost the ball after twice advancing into scoring position. Milton Phrais broke loose for 19 yards and the first score in the second quarter. He scored again in the final period on a plunge through the line. Willard Tilley scored Jonesboro's second touchdown in the third period on an 'off-tackle play after dashes by Mutt Alexander had placed the ball in scoring position. The Trojans made their only serious scoring threat in the closing minutes of the game, advancing to the Jonesboro six-yard line, where they were held for downs. The last quarter was played in a downpour of rain. Blythcvillc Chicks Win BLYTHEVILLE — The Blytheville High School Chicks opened their 10- game carrlpaign with a 65-to-O win over the Piggott Mohawks here Friday night. Coach Joe Dildy kept a parade of substitutes going into the game, working his regulars only -for brief intervals. Thirty-two players saw service for Blytheville. Homer Bessarse, fleet Chick halfback, scored two touchdowns and intercepted two passes for sensational runs. Russell Mosley received a kickoff and ran 90 yards to score one of his two touchdowns. Hughes also accounted for two and Brown, Roberts, Meredith and Harbert got one each. Walnut Ridge In Victory WALNUT RIDGE—For the first time *?•- ** '.. BY MARION WHITE OAST OF CHARACTERS PIUSCILLA PIERCE — heroine, youiiK womitn attorney. AMY KEHR—CHIy'w roommate and mnrderer'N victim. JIM K13UIUGA1V—Cilly'H flnnce. HARRY HUTCIHNS—Amy'H • traiiKf vlxltor. SKUGBANT DOLAN—officer.nH- •itnicd <<> Holve the murder of Amy Kerr. * * » Ye»<erdnyi Tlie web of clrcnm- •tnntlal evidence lightens nround Kerriean when Doliin point* out Hint he niicrht have been on the roof .and hidden afterward In CIlly'H apartment until the con- fiulon died down! CHAPTER X E not holding anybody yet," Sergeant Dolan told Cilly as he and Martin were leaving. "I'm telling you, and I'm telling everybody else in the house, to be on hand for a call down to headquarters. I'll be honest with you, Miss Pierce, the one I'm most Interested in is your friend Kerrigan. I'd like to know the reason he asked that girl up on the roof with him. When I find that out .. . well, we'll be seeing you." As soon as they were gone, Cilly went back into the living room and looked into the Cloisonne vase tor the newspaper clipping. She took it into the kitchen and held it over the flame on the gas stove until it disappeared into a fragment of black ash. Then she took Jim's postcard from underneath her pillow and did the same thing with that. The words on the card danced before her eyes as the flames spread around them. "Taking the first plane I can make. Love. Jim." She breathed a great deal easier when both tasks had been done. It was 11:30 by the banjo clock In the living room when Cilly was ready to leave the apartment. Only 12 hours since the four oi them had stood in this very room, laughing and happy. Only 12 hours, yet one of them was dead and another had vanished in a cloud of mystery. What was behind it all? » * * TF Amy and Jim had known each A other previously, as Jim's note would seem to indicate, why hadn't Amy mentioned it to Cilly before? Certainly she had heard Cilly mention his name enough. She suddenly remembered something she had quite overlooked. It wasn't altogether her idea that the four of them get together last evening in order that they might become better acquainted. It had been equally Jim's idea. And if Jim knew Amy, now did It happen that Amy had not recognized Jim Kerrigan's name? Ciily had mentioned it often enough at home. Cilly tried to figure it out as she walked to the subway. Somehow it was easier to think clearly once she was out of the hpuse. Perhaps there was something Amy had wanted hidden . . . prison, perhaps. That was why she tried to wipe out the past four years . . . why she still spoke of an Aunt Harriet who had passed away. Because she feared to speak of where she had been after she left Aunt Harriet, lest her secret slip out. Then the one all-important question returned. What did Amy's past life have to do with Jim Kerrigan? Jim had never mentioned Utah, He spoke of Chicago, for that was where he came from. He spoke of his father, whom Cilly understood to be in Chicago. He spoke of Mr. Maddox, the publisher of the Midwest Review, and a friend of his father's, who had given him a job as eastern representative because of that friendship. He spoke of his mother, who died when he was only 12. He spoke of summer vacations on a ranch with his father, and Cilly could sense the deep bond between these two. "You'd love my dad, Cilly," he had said one time. "Gee, how I'd like you to meet him . . ." and then his voice had grown suddenly wistful. * * * r r>HERE was no mystery to Jim. A Cilly was certain of that. He'd only been in New York a few months, whereas Cilly had lived here always, as had her parents, and her grandparents before them. But that was unusual. Nine out of every ten people you meet in New York come from the West or the South or from New England. It was after one o'clock when Cilly left the funeral parlors. And each time a shoulder brushed hers in the crowded streets, she started so violently that her own pounding heart-beats threatened to choke her. She was in no mood to put her mind on the work at the office which awaited her. She would have to turn the Harvey brief over to someone else. It was a disappointment not to be able to finish it herself; Mr. Crowcll had given it to her especially. Under the circumstances, however, there was nothing else to do. Tomorrow she would have to be out for Amy's funeral. Aad during the next few days, there would inevitably be many more conferences with Sergeant Dolan, or summons from him to appear at police headquarters. It would be much belter if she forgot the.' Hurvey brief, and adjusted her work at the office so that it would not require any immediate attention oh her part. As she entered the Cannon Building, she was surprised to see Harvey Ames directly ahead of her. He stopped at the newsstand te buy a paper; Cilly noticed that it was the early afternoon edition. She wondered if any news of Amy's death had appeared as yet. Mr. Ames turned toward the elevators and saw her. "Hello, Miss Pierce," he greeted pleasantly. "Where's my worthy secretary keeping herself today?" Evidently Sergeant Dolan had not seen him yet. "You haven't heard?" Cilly asked hesitantly. "Heard what?" "Amy was killed last night, Mr. Ames." "What?" "She fell from the roof oi' our apartment house." Let the police, she decided, tell him that it was a murder. M*; AMES gasped. He stared, open-mouthed, at Cilly. "You don't me&n—she wasn't— that girl?" His words were jerky, nervous. "What girl, Mr. Ames?" "That girl—in Brooklyn. St. Ann's Avenue?" Cilly nodded. She was not prepared for the manner in which Harvey Ames took the news of Amy's death. That he would be surprised, even a little stunned, she well expected. But he acted like a man suddenly stricken. His face blanched, he leaned against the wall as if to support himself. His dark eyes bulged. His collar choked him; he slipped one long finger underneath to loosen it. Harvey Ames was more than surprised at the news of his secretary's death. He was terrified. "How did you know, Mr. Ames?" Cilly asked him. "How did I know?" he repeated stupidly. "Why, I saw it in the paper. In this morning's t'sps* 1 . of course. That was it. There Amy's death in the morning papers. They were already print- hi history ft Wftlrtirt ftitjiis football team defeated Batesvllle here Friday Mint, SI to 8, in a downpour of rain. The first touchdown for Wnlnut ftidge was scored in the closing minutes of the first half by Smotherrrtan, the second on the first play of the sec* ond half. Smotherman ran 65 yards through the center of the Batesvitle line for a touchdown. Ctillnhnn scored the other In the' third quarter in a 20- yard run around right end. Batcsvllle wilted in the second half and was completely outplayed. The Pioneers scored in the' 1 closing minutes of the game when Massey received a pass from Terry on the 1 goal line. Captain Snapp played an Outstanding game for BatesVllfe while Smotherman, Sailings and Callahan stood out for Walnut Ridge. Walnut Ridge made 18 first downs to Batesville's six. / Hope Bows To (Continued from Page One) for 15 yards, Byrd suffering five penalties for n loss of 35 yards. Hope put up a game fight throughout the contest. The Bobcats were outweighed five pounds to the man. Captain G. Vi Keith ond Guard Johnny Wilson suffered injuries and only saw part of the game. Mize, Byrd starting fullback, was knocked out and removed from the game. The First Quarter Byrd received, Mi?e being forced out of bounds on the 12-yard line by W. Parsons. Johnny Wilson, Hope guard, was injured on the next play and was replaced by Major Simpson. Byrd attempted two more plays and then Mize got off a weak punt that gave Hope the ball on Byrd's 30, Bright made nine yards in two attempts. Fullback Joe Eason and Bright then made it n first down on the 15. Bright made five. Eason and Bright then carried it to the one-yard line where Bright went through right tackle and across the goal line standing up. W. Parsons kicked goal. A punting duel followed that left the bai 1 in midfield in Byrd's possession. Sv.eney got loose on a 15-yard run around right end. A pass frQm Leo Bird to Feducia, quarterback, placed the ball on the four-yard line as the quarter ended. Second Quarter Richardson dashed around right end on the first play to score Byrd's first marker. Leo Bird's attempted place kick was blocked by Percy Ramsey. Hope received, ball being kicked out on the 35. From that point Bright picked up 15 around right end. Eason pounded left tackle for five. Bright flipped pass to Reese for first down, putting the ball on Byrd's 35. Hope was held for downs and Bright punted out on the seven-yard line. Byrd started a march that was not stopped until the team reached Hope's two- yard stripe. It was an 89-yard march up the field on a series of running and passing plays, featuring Feucia, Richardson and Sweeney. Wearing Hope's goal, Captain G. V. Keith was injured and was replaced by Jewell Still. The ball went to Hope and Bright, backed up behind the goal line, attempted to punt out of danger. A bad pass came back and he booted a weak punt that gave Byrd the ball on Hope's 25. Feducia hit the line for eight yards and then passed to Sweeney who was downed on Hope's two-yard line. Feducia went over on the next play that put Byrd in the lead for the first time. Leo Bird's attempted placement was wide. Hope received, Bright being downed on his 35. Bright passed to Ramsey for 15. Eason, went through the powerful Byrd line for eight yards. Bright made it first down on a fake punt play, The old hidden-ball play was the next maneuver that saw W. Parsons get away for 6 ygrds. Eason, Hope's rapidly developing fullback, pounded at the line for more yardage and was finally brought down on Byrd's 12-yard line. Hope had traveled about 55 yards at this time and there was about five seconds left in the half. Bright chose to pass. Richardson intercepted and ran 50 yards up the field, being brought down by the speedy Aslin and Bright as the half ended. Third Quarter Wilson replaced Simpson at guard and then Hope received, Aslin returning to the 35. Bright was stopped after a three-yard gain. The hard- driving Eason went off tackle for 18 yards, carrying the ball to Byrd's 45. Hope was held and Bright punted, Ramsey downing the Byrd safety .man on his own 15. Oribson, Richardson and Feducia mixed an assortment of running and passing plays that carried the ball up the field. Hope halted the attack and gained possession on its 18. Hope was penalized 15 yards when Eason intentionally grounded the ball after being thrown for a loss. From behind the goal line, Bright punted, Oribson taking the ball on the 30 and running for touchdown. The play was nullified and Byrd was penalized. Feducia made 10 on two plays. He made another four yards. Hope stiffened and on the fourth down Captain Keith smeared the play, giving Hope possession on its own 15. Right here is where Byrd got a break that resulted in touchdown. Hendrix, center, intercepted a pass and ran to Hope's five-yard line. Richardson plunged for the touchdown. Attempt For extra point failed. Hope received, Bright returning to his 30. He made Five yards and then Leo Bird intercepted a pass in midfield as the quarter ended. Fourth Quarter Byrd made a first down and then eo Bird punted over the Hope goal line. Hope took the ball on its 26. Bright passed to W. Parsons for 11 made four through the line. After no gain on two following plays Vie punted, Leo Bird returning to midfield. Feducia made four and . , __ . ivas a he, and Cilly Knew Sweeney got loose on an end run thut x- had been nothing about can . ied tt , e ba ]j to Hope's 22-yard line. Byrd's big line began to wear ilov the Bobcats us Sweeney plunged ed and on the newsstands by mid- more a ,.,a Richardson made it eight. night. If Mr. Ames had not been ! putting the ball only a few yards fro. ' so surprisingly shaken, he would have realized that. The first details of the tragedy T/ould, at the very earliest, be in the afternoon edition of the evening papers. And that edition Harvey Ames waa holding in his hand. He had not opened it yet. (To Be Continued/ the Bobcat goal. Bird flipped a pass to Sweeney for touchdown. Bird converted for extra point. Hope received, Aslin returning to his 35. Aslin went around end for eight. Hope was held and Bright punted, Bird being downed on his 40. Bird passed to big Bob McCraw for 20 yards. Line plays curried it to Hope's 35. Hope's line held and Bird punted over trie iSBfet line, ttttpfe feibk tn« brill ' ' ' •' , .•.. . . .... Feducia intercepted fiflght's ; pass. Byrd suffered n penalty and iihable to gain punted out ori Hope's nine-yard line. Bright th?n passed to Hugh Reese who got loose for the longest run of the game 1 , the pass and run being good for fa yards, Reese being downed only a few feet from the Byrd goal. Bright was thrown for a 17' yard loss when he attempted to pass, Bright then fired a pass to ftamsey in an effort to score, a Byrd plnyer being penalized on the play that eel the ball up to within two yards of the goal line where Bright went over the right side for touchdown. Hope made extra point. Byrd received. On the second play Reese recovered a fumble, giving Hope the ball on Byrd's 40. Me* Craw then intercepted a pass as the gamgjeaded.. ---- ___ „, _ , ____ __ Dope's new $20,000 stadium was dedicated In a 15-minute program before tho game started in talks by Miss ByrJ Henry, Mayor Albert Graves, Claude Mann, District WPA supervisor Coach Foy Hammons of Hope and Coach Lee Dobson of Shreveport The new stadium was dedicated as Hammons Stadium in honor of the Bobcat coach, the name being selected by the Hope School Board, Next Friday night the Bobcats will play the Smackover Buckaroos at Hopa. It's A Racket (Continued from Page One) months course at $65. In that case, the selling fee would be only 10 per cent. In desperation, John agreed to the exorbitant commission, as he was unable to enroll for another "course." But after months of waiting, during which there appeared to be no hope of his story being sold, he finally gave up the idea of writing fiction, without ever learning that he had ben the victim of n "literary" racket. An ustralian has developed a calculating machine that solves problems by tracing curves on a piece of paper. One in every phone booth would speed the world's work. Legal Notice COMMISSIONERS SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That in pursuance of the authority and directions contained in the decretal order of the Chancery Court of Hempstead County, Arkansas, made and entered on the Gtli day of September, 1937, in a certain cause then pending therein wherein Frenla Amonette ct al. are plaintiffs and Alonzo Reed et al, are defendants, the undersigned, as Commissioner of said Court, will offer for sale at public vendue to the highest bidder, at the front door or entrance to the Citizens National Bank Building in the City of Hope, in Hempstead County, Arkansas, within the hours prescribed by law for judicial sales, on Saturday, the 16th day of October, the following described real estate' situated in Henipstead County, Arkansas, to-wit: The Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SW% SE'/j) of Section Thirty-three (33), in Township Nine (9) South, Range Twenty-six (2G) West, containing 40 acres, more or less; Also all of the West Half of the Southwest Quarter (W% SWW of section Ten (10), Township Ten (10) South, Range Twenty-six (26) West, except the following described tracts ot'. land, to-wit: Commence on the north or east side of the right-of-way of the Arkansas and Louisiana Railway, 250 feet north of the point where said Railway crosses the section line between Sections 10 and 15, in Township 10 South, Range 26 West, and run thence east 50 feet to the point of beginning, run thence east 280 feet, thence north 150 feet, thence west 280 feet to within 50 feet of said right- of-way, run thence southerly parallel to said right-of-way 150 feet back to the point of beginning; also commence on the north side of the right-of-way of the Arkansas & Louisiana Railway Company 400 feet north of where said Railway crosses the section line between said Sections 10 and 15, at the northwest corner of H. Bright's one- acre lot, the point of beginning, run thence east along the north line of Bright's lot 280 feet, run thence north 150 feet, run thence west 280 feet, run thence south parallel to said right-of- way back to the point of beginning; also begin on the section line 29 rods north of the southwest corner, of Section 10, in said Township 10 South, Range 26 West, and run thence east 29 rods and 5'/a feet, run thence north 9 rods, thence west 17 rods and 12 feet, thence south along the section line 9 rods back to the point of beginning (except, however, the right- of-way of said Railway Company); also begin at the southeast corner of Catherine Gambill's lot, and run 165 feet east, thence 200 feet north, thence 150 feet west, run thence 200 feet back to the point of beginning; also commence at the southwest corner of the SV- SWVi Section 10, Township 10 South, Range 26 West, and run thence east 120 yards to the point of beginning; run thence east 18 rods, thence north 18 rods, thence west 18 rods, thence south 18 rods back to the point of beginning, containing 2 acres, more or less; also commence at the southeast corner of Catherine ambiU's lot and run thence east 165 Feet to the point of beginning, run thence north 150 feet, thence east 100 feet, thence south 150 feet, thence west 100 feet back to the point of beginning; also one-half acre in the northwest corner of the SW!4 SVJVt of said Section 10, in said township and range,—the same being all the land wned by the said Harry Reed in the WVa SWV.1 of said Section 10 at the lime of his death. TERMS OF SALE: On a credit of three months, the purchaser being re- juired to execute a bond as required ,y law and the order and decree of ;-aid Court in said c;>use, with approved security, bearing interest at the rate of jht per cent (S'/i) per annum from date o£ sale until paid, and a lien being retained on the premises sold to secure the payment of the purchase money. Given under my hand this 15th day of i.cptembi;r, 1937. RALPH BAILEY, Commissioner in Chancery Sept 25, Oet 2 : Htrndon-Corneliut Burial Association bifteeai HOPE FUR*ttTt»H COMI'ANTf Hope, Atk For Safe Protection Cult for (.g*nt-r*l«MHS 5, tit, tXt COMMISSIONER'S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that in pursuance of the authority and directions contained in ..the ..decretal order of the Chancery Court of Hemp,stead County, Arkansas, made and entered on the Oth day of September, 1937, in a certain cause then pending therein wherein Nannie Belle Pinegar was plaintiff'and Willie L. Bradley et al. were defendants, the .undersigned, as* Commissioner of said Court, will offer for sale at public vendue to the highest bidder, at the front door or entrance to the Citizens National Bank Building in the City of Hope', in Hempstead County, Arkansas, within the hours prescribed by law for judicial sales, on Saturday, the 16th day of October, 1937, the following described real estate situated in Hempstead County, Arkansas, to-\vit: The East Half of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (E'A NW'/i NWM) of Section Twelve (12), Township Eleven (tl) South, Range Twenty-six (26) West, containing 20 acres, more or less. TERMS OF SALE: On a credit of three months, the purchaser being required to execute a bond as required by law and the order and decree of said Court in said cause, with approved security, bearing interest at the rule of ten per cent (10%) per annum, from date of sale until paid, and a lien being retained on the premises sold to secure the payment of the purchase money. Given under my hand this 15th day of September, 1937. RALPH BAILEY Commissioner in Chancery Sept 18, 25. COMMISSIONER'S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That in pursuance of the authority and directions contained in the decretal order of the Chancery Court of Hempstead County, Arkansas, made and entered on the Gth day of September, 1937, in a certain cause then pending therein wherein G. B. Rowe was complainant and W. W. Rowe et al. were defendants, the undersigned, as Commissioner of said Court, will offer for sale at public vendue to the highest bidder, at the front door or entrance to the Citizens National Bank Building in the City of Hope, in Hempslead County, Arkansas, within the hours for judicial sales, on Saturday, the IGth day of October, 1937, the following described real estate situated in Hempstead County, Arkansas, to-wit: The Fractional East Half of the Northwest Quarter (E% NWVi) of Section Seven (7), in Township Eleven (11) South, Range Twenty-five (25) West, containing 72.67 acres, more or less. TERMS OF SALE: On a credit .of tliree months, the purchaser being required to execu'te a bond as required by law and the order and decree of said Court in said cause, with approved security, bearing interest at the rate of eight per cent (8%) per annum, from date of sale until paid, and a lien being retained on the premises sold to secure the payment of the purchase money. Given under my hand this 15th day of September, 1937. RALPH BAILEY Commissioner in Chancery. Sept 18, 25 COMMISSIONER'S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That, in pursuance of the authority and directions contained in the decretal order of the Chancery Court of Hempstead County, Arkansas, made and entered on the 6th day of September, 1937, in a certain cause then pending therein wherein E. E. Briant was plaintiff and H. J. Prather et al. were defendants, the undersigned, as Com. missioner of said Court, will offer for sale at public vendue to the highest and best bidder, at the front door or entrance to the Citizens National Bank Building in the City of Hope, in Hempstead County, Arkansas, within the hours prescribed by law for judicial sales on Saturday, the 16th day of October, 1937, the following described real estate situated in Hempstead County, Arkansas, to-wit: The North Half of the Southeast Quarter (NVa SE'/i) of Section Twenty-three (23); the West Half of the Northwest Quarter (WV4 NW'/i) of Section Twenty -live (25); and two acres in the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SE'/i NW'/i) of said ection Twenty-five (25) described as follows, to-wit: Commence at the southwest corner of said forty acres and run thence north thirty-six (36) rods, to the point of beginning, run thence east ninety-nine (99) yards, run thence north one hundred eleven (111) yards, run thence west ninety-nine (99) yards, run thence south one hundred eleven (111) yards back to the point of beginning; also six and one- lf acres in the East Half of the Northwest Quarter (E',i NW'/i) of said Section Twenty-five (25) described as follows, to-wit: Commence at the southwest corner of said eighty acres ml run thence north three hundred line (309) yards to the point of be- inning, run thence north two hundred ninety (HUO) yards, run thence east about ninety-nine (99) yards to :hu center of the public road, run thence south along the center of the public road two hundred ninety (290) yards, run thence west back to the point of beginning—said land containing i' 1 the aggregate 168,5 acres, more or less, and being situated in Township Thirteen (13) South, Range Twenty-five (25) West. TERMS OF SALE: On a credit of three niunlhs, the purchaser being Jcquircd to execute a bond as required by law and the order and decree of ;.aid Court In said cause, with approved security, bearing interest at tlv.' rate of .ten per cent (10 £i ;.) per annum from date of sale until paid, and a lien being retained on the premises sold to secure, the payment of the purchase money. Given under my hand this 15th day of September, 1937. RALPH BAILEY Commissioner in Chancery Sept 18, 25. i;" i

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 11,800+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Try it free