Oakland Tribune from Oakland, California on February 17, 1930 · Page 13
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Oakland Tribune from Oakland, California · Page 13

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Oakland, California
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Monday, February 17, 1930
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Page 13
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y MONDAY- EVENING Da&IanU Ctifiune FEBRUARY 17, 1930 13 'BERKELEY, EMERYVILLE IN FINAL LOOP GAME -STRANGE-AS - IT SEEMS By John HbcJi nMR CUnT SP ORTSM ATTER BY FRANK GETTY UNITED PRCIS IBOATS COITO. WHITE sox m GIANTS READY J TO TR AH 2 JACiiEB-GIVEII EDGE III WE ATCMELEY the Browns during the fag end of last season. - . .V1S CJfaJ-A in q "ham ? iAll KEY-is the rrme of & boy in "Chnks to J.t Smith could jump . trorn the irrtide of one bbr into another- Two Managers Lead Teams to Texas; -Ground Trouble PlWUnd WHITE, Buffalo, H.Y, are decor&lors ." A? Jajneown. HV., Xf Jeweler. LIGHT 6RDWN is th rro? of 6 martin Frewsbvrd, lass B Contesl is Preliminary to Varsity Battle BERKELEY high's basket, bail, squad has but one hurdla to cross before it can claim the Alameda County Athletic league champion ship. That hurdle crossing, of failure to crosf will take itimorrow tft Berkeley high when- EmerjyvuV meets the Yellowjackefis in the final round of loop play., "No other tmu IMWIIWl vg.r ass RECORD WIN ATAGUA Track Mark Falls as Cameron's-Entry Cops NEW YORK, Feb. 17. G, D.Cameron's Heydidle Piddle, a long: shot, broke the track record to win the San Pasqual handicap for three-year-olda and up, feature at-traction of Agua Caliente'a program yesterday. - Heydidie -DWUc covered the six furlongs in 1:10 35 and" shaved three-fifths of a second off the court reoord. The winner paid 5.6 to win, f 18.80 to place and 7 to show. Tha Northway stable's Gaqulmo was second and Shaate Sullet third. Vha sixth race, a siz-Turions; .-gallop for four-year-olds and up with women Jockeys, went, to Tecate, ridden by Miss Ar-dath fc hnlder, s Tong Beach high acliool girl. Toe Urn was lite S-5. At Havana. Margaret Cal, swift running daughter of Jim Gaffney, won tha Association de Dependien. tea Del comercio pdrse in a naro. dry from- tha - National Btable'e King David. O. L. Foster's Old SAN ANTONIO, Texas, Feb. 17v-(rP)-Pitchert and catchers of two major league clubs, the New York Giants, of the national league and th -A Chicago Whjte Sox of the J-American league, were here today to start spring training.'-The batterymen arrived here '--V last night, the other player' L. C. McEvoy. vice-president or tha club, has great hopes for Stle- ley, who came up from tne uexas league. The Brownie executive expects the ex-Texas leaguer to develop Into one ef the beat left-, handers In the league. Earl Caldwell, right-handed Eltcher, who came td the , ii-owns from Waco In the Texas league. Is another of the rookies who McKvojr expects to make the grade. HolHhauser, from Baltimore, and (stiles of Tulsa are other hurlera who will be carried south. - Sammy HalesWho -cavorted around third base quite a bit last season for the champion Athletics, will be given a chance to break Into the Brownie Infield. "Just listen in what they" say," Cobb requested of Cain, "and afterwards let me know what they said.". Cullen "found himself sur. - rounded by darkles who fol- . lowed the movement of every player luring- the session with .- keen ey. The proved far more pertinent than those of the average laus at a big league park. A each' player took hie turn at bat or r went after a ball In the field, the darkle were critical but ...fair. - -'- . "Those boya know their base-hall," Cobb remarked after the session. Tyrus . was brought up la Georgia, and know hi darkles nearly aa well aa he know (his) baseball. "What did they say f he asked Cain. k "They liked that w boy named Lou Blue," .replied Cullen. The following season Lou Blue waa a sensation, as first .bassmaa for the Detroit Tiger. ,c."rrt6i,?6llow--boBt- Marek-U-1- The Giants, making their heaV' quarters at "the St. Anthony hotel, --were Scheduled for workouts at"' , League park; under the direction';'' " of Dave Bancroft ' an4 , "Irish t? Meusel. , ' 'j The White Sox, with Ileal r ' quarter at the Gnnter hotel, j (.waited aa Inspection ol the -; e-' ball park at St. Mary' anlvev- ' Ity before the word waa -ct-resj to start training. ' Her te pas on the eendttiea csf the field were Donle Bush, tan-".'' J ager of the Whit Sox, Leu Corals- key, treasurer of the elubj Seere-- J" tary Harry Grablner and iVeti. Baiv bour, traveling secretary. ' will be played. Piedmont and Ala-emda having finished their acheii- . ules Friday.- I ' Marysvllla has Already suffered a trouncing at tie hands of the Berkeleyans, lfrng tl to II, Its worst defeat of theyear. That Coach Jack fiadie' Colleg City 'youngstera arp capable of doing the same ttrfj, again Is a foregone conclusion, It least around Berks-, ley high. . Coach Vilton Or less of Bmery- vllle Is ti'h expecting any upset to be furnliAied by the Bpartana, but he Is oointlnf considerably on their ...WlHUigJfesa to-rotlntata their flghU lng siiA-lt to at least out down the margA which marked their last Bawled r w r -i shoTnir against the Berkeley team. :ailn will Drohablr start h . w runes y Jle bowled i games, I v4 Ufied 53 ions oV bolls HcOu SwM SyaalMt if is wprso on ffhe end of your cigar IF YOU DOUBT TH1 WRITE rOK WOO TO THE t Aarnett and I'hllllpa In th forward berths, Chase at can- ' ler, and Brannon and Bertoll' in guards. Bertoll appears a hoi tor forward than tha.busky ' Berkeley football star hus . proved to be and he will prob-. ably be counted upon for tha scoring honors. Against Pled mont lie wo red 18 points, Oriese will probably choose Bob Senoff and J Gomes at forwards. Harry-Leach at center and Henry Banedettt and Godfrey Duncan at guards. The last three are the only lettermen back from last year's varsity Bpartana, while the remainder of his squad are mostly sophomores. Clans B teams open the program, with the Berkeley lnds favored to win, although nothing hinges on the outcome aa they have already won the light eight title. Q ; i Argentine Defeat ' Picked Polo Team LOS ANGELES, Fel). 11. VP) The four horsemen front the pampas rode down an all-star quartet picked from tha Mldwlck and Hurricane teams at -Fine $lldwlck Country club polo field hare yes- . terday. The score was II to T. The Argentine team won the' Pacific - ('oast Open polo championship last week by defeating, Ild wick Ytojf. DOflT SPIT ISITTINO I PRIAM PISIAK CICNCE CONDCMNS IT PICKNOV FORilPS IT Jhe lw Make It Punisrubl PONT SPIT BOARD OF HEALTH Killefer's Job AT least eight rookies will make bids for regular berths with the 1980 Browns. Pra-lralning aeason Indications are that officials of the Browns will depend, to a great extent, upon the eight rookies and hold-overs from last years lourm piace squaa 10 bring an American league pennant to St. Louis. Brownie ornclais are or ine opinion that the present roster may be sufficient and that ' they can se no reason for unloading a horde of raw recruits for Manager William Killeter to waste valuable time looking - over. j Start February 25 FOUR pitchers, two inflelders, one outflejder and one catcher will be among those present when Killefer Issues his call for the rookie squad to step forward at Weat Palm Beach, Fla., Febru ary . . . ... ,.... intermingles, wun mt iom will of course be the seasoned members of last season's squad, most of-wrom -appear- assured- of retaining their Jobs. Indications are that not more than 40 players will be "carried south for lie . training grind. A month before, open- lug of the'coiiditidning soaaiona, "' 9 men were slated to place their feet under Brownie training tables. Promising Southpaw A MONO tha most promising, of the rookies la Fred Btieley, left-handed hurler, who came to Klckapoo was third. The winner, owned by M, A. Callahan, waa neg-leoted in the betting and paid 10 to 4. The-five and one-half furlongs were run In 1:0 l-l. but X . the rr r e -' V:-" Vi 1, war against Spitting is a AUTHOU, DEFEATED fuEtl TRYCOhiEBACK III Il-YRUN Madison Square Is Scene of Return . Track Battles TEW YORK, Feb. U.tfP) IN A number of track stars who were defeated earlier in the season will try to come back tonisrht at the New York A. C. games at Madison. Square Garden. Dr. Paul Martin of Switzer land and Stanislaw Pet-ktawicz of Poland, the lone European Invaders of -. the year. Both were defeated recently in the Millrose meet and tonight they try conclusions with their conqueror PaMiiawlrx. who was defeated by Paut Bakers, rising star of the Penn State college track team at tiun miles, will encounter tha youngster again at the 1000-meter distance, the favorite of the Polish runner. . Martin waa beaten by a hair's hrcadth In the MUlrose half mile by Fred Vclt, former New Vork university runner. He heads the field for the Brefnev half-mile tonight with . Veil, fhll JCdwards. former N, . V. V. star, now competing for the Hamilton Olympic dub of Canada, and Charles Thompson of the Now York Central A. A., winner over Velt and Edwards at Ponton, Saturday, as his leadlnsr rivals. Geora Slmpsoo of Ohio State; l who turned In the sensational 3 ty time for 100 yards last spring, will be against Jimmy Daley of Holy Cross, Hid Klesefhorst of Tale, Ben Hand o Frlneeton and a number of other consistent Indoor sprinters in a 60-yard rc. . A new contender for the pole vaulting honors, hitherto monopo lised by red sturdy or ai ana the Los Angeles A. C, and Barney Berllnger of Penn., appears in Tommy Warne of Northwestern. Warne holds the indoor record from a dirt runway. Is co-holder of the National Collegiate A. A. title and wae runner up to Sturdy in the National A. A. U. championships. over bis head, even back of him. A good Kagby player wonkl bee a great addition to lateral passing, a form of at-tack 'that will develop more and more la future season. "Another game that would take some ef th high pressure from the emotional side ef football would be a welcome addition. These now working along rugby lines hsve a great ehanee. not only to provide -Interesting competition for the stu dents, out also to nulla up anuiner fall sport thst mar help to decrease some of football's steam. "To help settle an argument." writes L. P., "who were the six greatest baseball batteries of all time?" 'Here at least are sl worthy candidates to be considered Matbearon ana Bresnanan Brown snd KHng Walsh and Kul- llcan Johnson and Street Wad- dell and Schreck Grove and Coch rane. They will do until some one ele comes along. If any of these doesn't fit there are Alexander and Kill tf er Young and Zimrner, v. ho si 111 also do In a pinch. "How ran you get tensi'Ti out ef a gulf swing?" ak a ret'ier. Ahout tlie sain? you can : t crusado of decency . join it. Smoke CERTIFIED CREMO! MRS. PROCTOR, WEAVER LEAD I lixed Foursome h Won With Card of 69 J.-W. PROCTOR anrN iVl Dr. Don Weaver led a field of 62 competitors in a mixed two-ball medal play tournament at Sequoyah yesterday with the excellent score of 80-1 1-69. This card was low gross and low net but with onlv one trophy to win nera they were awarded, loA rrnn arid low net was aeouredw jfrs. A. B. Loomls.and O.' Elllng- house, who teamed, well to gain the low net trophy. Mrs. J. C. Maxtleld 4 W. D, Reed, with S-16 11, and Mrs. Western iiOgan and Pr. P.' H. Wlllemln. whose card was 9J-21 72, tied toe second and third net trophies Scoring was unusually low in all eases and with numerous, ties for aubsequent places the complete re turns are interesting. Mrs. J. M. Dodson and S. A. Livingston finished with a net of 71, Just out of tha winning column; Mrs. Wilton Bernard and -Or, a, H. White, with low handicap al lowance of e, failed to count In the net returns, but their score ef 12-4 71 was second low gross, for which' there waa no trophy, Mrs. ). R. Knowland Jr. and Harold Cossitt, another low handicap team, did not figure with St-l 80, while Mrs. H. K. Cotter and J. W. Proctor, handicapped at 11, also failed to play to form. . Summary: Leading scores: lira J. W. Proctor Dr. ioa Weaver.... Mrs A. B. Luoufjs O. UlllnghouM t Mrs. J. C. alaxfield . .S8-11 It . .91-14 71 W. l Ked .11-1172 Irs. Western Logan . P. M. Wlllemln.. ,.81-1171 ,.7'14 71 ..i-2 74 ,.4'-l 74 ..Sl-lt 71 .191-;-7 Mrs s. 4. M. lxidso 3. A. Ltvloicston Mrs G. P. Hallschey fiud Pond Mrs. Vic Lattanaer B. T. Minney Mrs. A. U. Kopperud A. Ckrist, Jr... Mrs. A. Christ, Jr. C. L. ltbrnk...,. ,,,,,, Mrs. K. H. Long J. JUL. .... Mrs. W iX Reed 11-11 7T K. J. MoMulUa Miss BlllinKsley .... .101-24 77 ...,.100-ll-r77 .12-471 ......11-1171 Mss WilwmlB Mrs. ..Milton Bernard Dr. E. H. White Mrs. Dob Weaver Sam Jackson ....... Mrs. A M. Smith W. Bsllaohey .13-1478 Miss wary fonn Dr. A. M. Smith ...15-1771 ..101-2171 ... 10-17 71 ..102-2171 ....tJ-t 80 ...11-1810 Mrs. D. C. Young A. D Olllver..... ... Mrs. C. U Hesrank A. M. Kopperu Mrs. A. D. Olllver Vic Lattanner Mrs J. K. Knowland H. R. Cossitt Mrs. E. H. White Ben F. Woollier Mrs. P. M. Wlllemln P J. Wuepper 101-1 80 sir, rt. A. McUonal M. T. Bracken....... ..11-1110 .100-2010 . .05-U 11 ..11-1181 Mrs. fcatu Jackson H. Sienson Mrs. F J. Wueoper J. R. Knowland. Jr.. Mrs. K. H. Stevenson H. H. Michaels Mrs O. Kiltnshouse Ft. C. ;inn 104-21 SI Mrs R. K. ottr J. W. Proctor 14-11 S3 HA! IUIWIM I L"Ut U rVIV C 1 JUIUtl 1 "OURTBEN olybs are now naar- ly ready to pack and mpblHse m to see what they can do about lh Athletic and tha Cubs. The As and the Cs have about the same people back who. broke up both league last summer and no one yet has discovered a club that Vi it as Ivnniinuall An m i sr Vi ia nlnna it the big gap unlesa aooidents or In juries vul away imuin ol taie two leader. These two clubs haven't the two greatest infields that ever- played, but they have good pitching, hard hitting out fields, good catching and smart handling from both camps. Nslther l invincible, but they still look to be the class. The major league-getaway la the , opening buglo note of spring. . jEven'thoee who are still snowbound can get a whiff of spring fragrance by Inhaling front far away 41ms pleasant odor of new mown base hits, aa presented In the sporting pages. Hope springs eternal In the baseball breast nntil around the middle of May or the first of June, ao for the next two monilis or ' more the opthnlstlo imagination ef the home town fan can run riot until the big puncture arrive In late spring or early summer, . . The Foreign Legion Jack - Slarkey, practically the lone delelat Jeft In the heavyweight army, Is now facing a flanking movement by the Foreign Legion. 'The list Includes Phil Hcott, Max Sehmeling, Camera, Campolo and Uscundun; representing Oreat Britain, Germany, Italy, South America and Spain. If Sharkey slips safely. hyScott and Sehmeling by early summer he may still have to account for on of the Invading mastodons, such aa Camera or Campolo, who may learn enough in the next aix month to be dangerous by next September. --Outside of Sharkey th next lead ing American prospect Is Tuffy Griffiths, who has come quite a distance In the laqt eighteen months. Sehmeling ha shown more stuff than any of the others, ' bat his retirement from active campaigning just at the lime ' he neeileel more evork ia not going to help hi cause. He may have euough'aatural tal-uot to overcome this handicap by a hard training siege, but he will nils the experience of .one or two hard fight h might have crowded under bl belt since last June. There are. few abtitate for experience when one t shooting at tha ' championship In gny gamer The Coming of Rugby If any serious attempt is mad to .introduce rugby football Into American universities It is almost sure to catoh on. It will not re move the dominance of American football, but in time it may divide attention and it is aura to attract a large following, both among the players and the spectators. Rugby is in many way faster game than American looipau. it calls lor greater all around speed and ror more continuous movement. Aa Americain football game last two heurs and In this two bour the ball Is actually in movement about twelve or thirteen minutes. Those who have played both games in sist that Rugby demands better condition, Just as basketball doea. because there are fewer resting spots. GAMES TONIGHT IXPUSTRIALi liEAGCE Men's Class B at University . 7 p. m. Great Western vsV Oen. .Electric. 8 p. m. Golden State vs. Oliver Un. Filters, p. m. Cap., Sull., and Purth ,v. 'P. G. and K. Wlnifn'i Class B at McCbmoiKl's 6:30 p m. H. C. .Capwell vs. , Montgomery Ward,1 7:30 p, m jcap., Sull., and I'urth vs. Pacific. Telephone, - 8:30 p. mv MacAlarr JJo. t vs. i Marchant. A? KASTBAY LEAGt'E - At Hoover Jr. . T p. m. 130 Berk. Y. M. C. A. VM. S J 3 jk p m. UnL Y. M: C. A. vs. Frt. Natives. 9 p. m Unl.. Qak. Natives vs. Ramblersv " At Westlaka Jr. t p, no. 14 Bata 'vs. -Oakland Bank, semifinal. ' it p. m. Bhopplng News vs. Frag-rs. At Alameda high T p. m. Ala. Y. M. I. vs. Walts. At Wilson Jr. 7 p. m.-r-Unl. Centrals vs. Wooae. 8 p. ni. Unl. Maccabees vs. Athenians. " 9 p. to. Unl. Cardinals vs.. Central yanks. s Y. M. C. A. CALIFORNIAn 8 p. m. Unlimited boys. Oak land vs. Richmond at Richmond Y, M. C. A. McDTFER , MESAPUTTA GOLF CLUB I BY BARRIi PAfNE - vm nwroesf sor m OOLT IS a HAir-TOfTD APPROM tKar MPf CLEAR ACROSS THE WEN, BOIXJCCS Of A TRE1, HITS A SAND- eoc, kicks sack re Ml MAC, OMaTS THE ' aMtocsr SHOT TNC6CCM AaM ROUS M 661P into toe cup- mr seor is so MFfKCcr TKAT I HAVS MAM IT ' C4M.V CWCt ! 1 13 Try a Certified Cremo eee how wonderfully good It is! Made of the choicest, tenderest leaves that the crop affords, we claim Certified Cremo't quality is tastier than that of any other cigar. Don't let . its 5c price stand In your, way. Your physician has in mind a cigar like Certified Cremo when he ' recommends a mild smoke in place of heavy brands, . , . . Crush-proof, . . immaculate , . , foil-wrapped . Certified Cremo Is the kind of cigar the late Vice-President Marshall undoubtedly waa thinking of when he said "What this country needs Js a good 5c cigarl" Of course the spitter earns your disgust , , , his filthy hahit ia revolliug. Why not feel the same way about the old-fashioned cigar the cigar rolled by dirty fingers and tipped with pit? Remember, more than half of all cigars made in this country areTetiU made byhandanCL therefore ubjectto the risk of spit! v .Certlfled Cremo protecte you against this ahomlnat tlon! Every tobacco leaf entering the clean sun ny Certified Cremo factories ia scientifically treated by methods developed by the United States Government during the war. And its purity is safeguarded along every step of iherway by amazing inventions that foil, wrap and lip the cigars with, out the possibility of spit! r to m Itugny will alo furnish fine training for the American fame, since It dcmnnrU Mnarl-er, faxtersntl bettor l arrnind lns, A ctwhI f!ucliT rhi)'- j er l-ri't siipf .'(...vl frt h.ne a ' hall fHrmvn intn 1-U ! tr pi'ltt rW'fcr l"'H 1 z . ."sK'h. lie can mke it pfi t.'e t . i. htoM out of h turntn or C 'H cut of a e "r..".. Or th r rya V' " ' ' ' 1 il f f' T f.c' frost. Low net. t Tied for 2nd ami 3r4 pt.

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