The Emporia Gazette from Emporia, Kansas on August 21, 1958 · Page 9
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The Emporia Gazette from Emporia, Kansas · Page 9

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Emporia, Kansas
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Thursday, August 21, 1958
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Page 9
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1? Emporia, Kansas, Thursday, Auguist 21, 1958 THE EMPORIA DAILY GAZETTE Ex-Soldier "Remembers Roy Acuff Emporian Recalls Shows At a Dismal Alaska Post The scheduled appearance of the Roy Acuff troupe at the Lyon County Fair Friday night has reminded Ray Call, Gazette photographer, of the last time he saw and heard the famous folk-singer. Mr. • Call's story follows During the Korean War the Army activated one of the most forsaken posts in the world. Jt was the Port of Whittier, Alaska, and it was four or five hours by train from the nearest town. Besides being isolated, Whittier had one of the worst climates on earth. Curing the summer when it was light 24 hours a day Whittier had continuous rain or drizzle; during the dark winter it was always snowing .... in fact, most winters the post had at least 50 feet of snowfall. It was reported to have the second wettest climate in the world. Morale of the troops assigned to 24 months duty at Whittier was generally low. The only way in and out of the Army port by land was on the one train a day that came down from Anchorage on the railroad through 10 miles of tunnels and many miles of rugged mountain country. Most of the men only got out once or twice during their entire tour of dutv, some not at all. Except for the post movie, there was not much entertainment in Whittier. Every time the rain stopped, troops played baseball or fished, or tried to find other outdoor activities; but most of the time the routine was eat, sleep, work; eat, sleep, work. The only USO show with a well- known star to play the port during my tour of duty was Roy Acuff and his Smokey Mountain Boys. They came down from Anchorage just before Christmas. More than half of the 2,500 troops stationed at Whittier were from the South or Middle West, and most of them knew the folk music played by the Acuff troupe .... so when show time arrived the 700- seat • theater was full, standing room was taken, and' a large crowd was packed around the doors in the lobby. Mr. Acuff probably never had a more enthusiastic audience. After many of his numbers, the applause lasted three and four minutes; and his "Great Speckled Bird" stopped the show for more than five min-' utes. • After the show Mr. Acuff left the theater through the main exit and saw the huge overflow crowd unable to see the show. He was with Lt. Donald Ecker, the port's Speciai Services Officer, and he asked why the men were there. Lieutenant Ecker told him they were men who had come' to see the show but couldn't get in. "He was one of the most humble men I have ever met," Lt. Ecker said later, "I believe he was truly proud to see his music was so important to those boys." *«co Mr. Acuff called the depot and had his special train held for another two hours. He took his troupe back on stage, set up the instruments and opened the doors to the soldiers who had not been able to get in to the first show. The theater was again filled to capacity— and many had to stand — but everyone who wanted to see the show was admitted. The Smokey Mountain Boys had another enthusiastic audience. When Roy Acuff and the Smokey Mountain Boys were ready to go back to the train to head back to Anchorage a large crowd fo grateful soldiers was waiting at the station to see them off. Drives Hot Truck KANSAS CITY, Kan. <AP>— Nearly every passing motorist waved at Robert F. McKenzie load of trash. "I knew I didn't know all those people," said McKenzie afterward. He discovered at his next stop that the trash was on fire. Reciprocal Trade Is Extended Four Years WASHINGTON (AP)-President -Eisenhower has signed legislation giving the reciprocal trade program four more years of life. It is the longest extension ever granted by Congress. The administration had requested a five-year extension, but Eisenhower made it clear in signing the bill Wednesday that he was quite happy with what Congress provided. Page Thre« Make Trip to Wesv BUSHONG-Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Basen returned to their home in the 109 community Tuesday after a trip to Colorado and Arizona. They drove to Wichita, and went by plane to Aurora, Colo., whore they visited Mrs. Basen's son, Ronald Lentell, and his family, and to Sedona, Ariz., where they were guests of Mrs. Basen's daughter, Mrs. Bill Herrick, her husband and family. While the Basens were away, Mr. Basen's uncle, Floyd Ketcham, stayed at their home and did the farm chores. CHESTER FOWLER, a 1958 graduate of Emporia High School, has been granted a 19581959 scholarship to the College of Emporia. At Emporia High he was a member of Future Farmers of America, and received the State Farm Award and the District Swine Production Award. He was also president of 4-H and active in dramatics, and was a member of the cross-country, wrestling, and track teams. At the College of Emporia, he plans to take a pre-engineering course. Fowler lives with his~ grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Fowler, Rt. 2, Emporia. Dr. J. T. Sandefur to Head E-State Department The appointment oí Dr. J. T. Sandefur as associate professor and head of the department of secondary education in the Division of Teacher Education at Ern- poria State Teachers College was announced today by John E. King, president. Since 1955, Dr. Sandefur has been principal of the Davies county high chool at Owensboro, Kentucky. He has had six years of previous teaching and administrative experience in Kentucky high schools. A graduate of Western Kentucky State College at Bowling Green, Dr. Sandefur holds the master's degree and the doctorate from the University of Indiana. He completed work for the later degree this summer. Corduroys, knits and Smith Is Finally Declared a Winner TOPEKA <AP)-The State Canvassing Board has officially certified Republican Congressman Wint Smith as winning renomination in the Sixth District by 51 votes. The board certified 12,039 votes for Smith, 11,988 for Keith Sebelius, Norton attorney, and 2,759 for Joe Gunnels, Colby. Unofficial returns had a 41-vote margin for Smith. He seeks reelection to his seventh term. Seb- V clius said yesterday he would not ask a recount. Smith will face Elmo Mahoney of Dorrance in the general election. Mahoney, who was defeated by Smith in 1954 and 1956, defeated Milo Sutton, Salina publisher, for the Democratic nomination, 7,486 to 4,611. The Sixth District votes were the first announced by the beard. Official returns showed Smith carried 16 of the district's 26 counties. His top margin over Sebelius was 385 votes in Smith County, Sebelius made it close by winning pluralities of 742 in his homi county, Norton, and 712 in Saline. :•'.•; ;. ;. .•*.' The one "audience rating"advertisers can depend on every day throughout the year is newspaper READershipZ- adv. * .•'••- * FOR ATHLETE'S FOOT , USE T-4-L BECAUSE— J It sloiifhs off ln/fctcd sWn. Expose» morY ftrms to its killing: acllon. l.V I IIOUE if not pleased with STRONG, instant dry- In^ T-4-L liquid, four J8c back at aoj- drag store. Use T-1-L FOOT POWDER too— gire 3. film of antiseptic protecUoi Now at Morris Drug Co. — adv. '' dark-tone cottons for sizes 5 to 13 5.98 It's such fun to wear small {unlor sirei when you have such thrifung styles to choose" from ot Wards! The perkiest cotton knits, the newest-Jerking Dan River plaids, the most interesting textured and corduroys. Full-skirted, shirtwaist, Jumper sever oí onhi» Rfict 1 WARDS WAR. O Hurry down to Wards and shop., then count your healthy savings! YOUR MOST CONVENIENT ONE-STOP SHOP FOR GET A FREE ESTIMATE ON WARDS LOW-COST INSTALLATION SERVICE TODAY» ROOFING, SIDING MIUWORK CUSTOM KITCHENS SALE! Storm-screen all-aluminum window 1ATH OUTFITS up lo 74 combined inches • Heat hardened, extruded aluminum • Panels remove from inside home Pre-scored flanges assure custom fit. . .steel sprir.gs hold inserts any heigh. Assembled, .cartoned. Each 5 or mori. SALE! 7-8" aluminum stor-screen door 29 Wards lowest price ever! •-- : • Z-bar frame for custom fit ' • Knob latch, pneumatic closer Install to swing either right, left. Bottom adjusts for draft-free closure. In six sizes. . . , all hardware included; •.'•'•.-. WATER HEATERS _WATER PUMPS ": BUY NOW... 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