The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on October 8, 1959 · Page 18
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 18

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Algona, Iowa
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Thursday, October 8, 1959
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^^;^r«r:,'-, £^-^4*;,, -- ~-,,"uJ>',. '. V -.,' ' 'If It;i ,» (IV,' ; '', if 6tl M«Jn« Thursday, Oct. 8, 1959 FEUD OUT IN THE OPEN The smolde*Hn& feud befween University of l«*we AfhIoH* Qiratfor P«ul iroehter and Fool- boll Coach Forest Evashevskt, U out in the open. ft hfcs bftfen simmering for idmetime. The lymrntf ;w|3S rettched when Brechler fcninounted hVwm rernalnJna at Iowa with a nice salary Increase. If Was }ollowe'd by Evashevski's on* hpuntement.thaf he was leaving Iowa at the end of his tohtrafit, which has until 1963 to 30, how* , Differences of opinion with regard to the recruiting program ore given as the cause of disagreement between the two men. This isn't the only feud in the midwest. Up IN 1960-MAYBE? The present year is going to pass with n6 teeming progress toward elimination of the city dump a& a municipal eyesore on the nroth approach to Algona. The dump, however, it nearing the end of its potential capacity and some action must take place in the near, future. , When this happens, we once,again broach the. Idea of converting the ofd dump area into a municipal park area, With facilities that Would prove inviting to traveling tourists who are camping along the way. This year more families than ever before have done their vacationing with camping equip- merit of their.own?.the trend will be greater as at Minnesota efforts to shako up the athletic the years pass. The only thing most of these Itafi'havo met e stonewall in the university campers need is a decent and protected place to' stop overnight/ with running .water and rest room facilities. We do not propose a large civic expend! ture to make this con version,, but we do propose to kill two birds with one stone — convert an eyesore- into a grassy park area, and offer an inviting reason for more .traveling tourist-campers to stop -overnight in Algona. A modern park area open to campers wil put Algona in every road map and campers' directory Ini trie country in a year or two, indicating the facilities available, Many of our own presideh>, Th$ president is soon retiring, how- eveh and when he does a top-to-bottom cleanup is likely to tqkfs place', That js, unless the Gophers ltarl,wmhlrtg OH th& gridiron. At Iowa, the situation is riot/ exactly the same; tho Hawkeyes under Evashevsk! have done'well. Last year, nearly 20 million people attended colllege and university football games and paid admission. This is big' business. Recruitment is a vital .part .of winning teams. There is a constant battle to maintain a balance between legal recruitment, and, outright subsidy, and athletic directors, coaches* alumni and university presi- dents'are bound to get mixed in turmoil. In the meantime,, the'Colorado Supreme Court has held that an Injured football player at the University of Denver was in legal fact an employee of the University hired to play football and entitled to collect wormen's compensation for disability from his' injury. Now where.does-.that, leave the line be- lw?en '^rrjpjeur'.'ian.a-,"professional" athletics? HOG PRICES DEPRECIATE Grundy^Regisier ~- 1 Ralph Moore, Grundy County A.S.C." chairman, sold two loads of hogs from his farm in Lincoln-township) the past week. The hogs brought $1000 a load. Just a year before, he sqld twq loads of hogs of abou,t the same weight and received ,£lij506 a .load for v trjem,',That made a difference rof $1200.; That '.amount can be charged as depreciation,-much the 'same*as' the first year depreciation on a car. The'hog price depreciation Was higher than car depreciatibn. . , * -What .added more to- the shrink in price of hogs in one year is the increase in the price of the feed purchased to get the hogs ready for market. This;hog price depreciation means tha). average market'h.ogs now bring $15 less than, they .brought a year ago. As we market approximately a quarter million hogs in Grundy county in a year, the depreciation in hog prices in Grundy county in one year adds up to $3,750,000 or about 12% of the county's farm income - for. the past year. Other business a,si4e,from farming in the county will feel the loss farmers are taking from the dip in hog prices. The depreciation that farmers must take reaches the rest of us who have farmers as their customers. I Vi f V .. __.„ - T—.-• L _l Hipper pcs ,IRmucs Rl E, Call Street—Ph. CY 4-3535—Algona, Iowa .Entered as second class matter at the postofflee qt" Algona. Iowa, under Act of Congress of .March 3, 1879. l_ ._- v . --„, ,- , - -, r - _.' __ .j . ' Issued Thursday in 1959 By THE UPPER DES MOINES PUBLISHING CO. R. B. WALLER, Editor DON SMITH, News Editor CLIFF LONG, Advertising Mgr. FERMAN CHRISTOFFERS, Plant Foreman- citizens guides. -have already used such maps anc I ..*.. oroiighiy; « Of amttfit of" chimpanzee and jhte debut ift Disney's press room would seeln lafgfetwnw, . : .< • > rv Thus, we bffef the reieiig to you jt&t as it eamei to your Molly/ wood erfafld-bdy: -*• * ' * * *"W» .fuattir, ttiM .ttttMM something comman to all gfeat tjerJEormers, is "bemg radiated ut Hollywood named Mi 'Hailed mt PILE* pf tm . M I UPPER DfiS MOWtfiS act* n, ma < ' v ,# ,, * /'*';>• ; , A i»#nado awepi Ihfdugh wy< tt'ft " "*' .. Marjoric Si *^ . Moh- ttirnfef wan. . „ , „ „„ ,.. , ' » veteran of the film IK trSe 1 star stuff humility. He'll go far,' f for 'Stubbs He .has Was mowd fromJts'fOuttd-- 'S3 cents; soybe6ft|,,68*etitej hens, s shattered. A 10 cents; aftd dtrfte, sik cents. "Oops — thought the window wa* closed I" Washington /<~> " highlights * A Weekly Report from >:/tc Nation's Capital, by Ray Vtrn6n SHADOWS IN THE EAST — ary War, the War of 1812, the 'after'the storm Algona American: ^fiolffi>, post „,.,* » clock was,-left, standing on were set, for a big^hwmbership the mantle,. However,, all of the drive. The winning'.team was to nt £S m .H- , He ' u &° tlar i , •' parts had been bldwn'ifrtim the be treated .to a free-iUricheori.af- • "Sttifabs is an actor to reckon timepiece; -A;-goldfish, bowl was ter the drive oh, ArmisticfeDay. With. l He out*ears Gable, out- blowtf from the table to the floor,' . -^ • ' ''•>• ^^.-.ix/-!—L—. grihs Joe ••' E. Brown* and out- The water remained iff the bowl, . - , -v^, ;., < grunts Brando. He plays tha but ,>the ;l «fish'"; inside, !were dead. I annl N<yll£6'tt> ; '> violin worse than Jack Benny, joe~ Verbrtlgge, alsti-,frbjrn the Le Sr l V I 'V I !V**«? . and with his feet. He has as .Armstrong, area, lost a' double », OTie * OP itidempttHA'rtoj* ' ' 'much hair, on his chest 'and more corn crib and his car-was wrecked. NOTICE is HEREBY''cMVEtr"that on his back than any screen Extensive • damage, was also re- there has been incorporated under and lover. ' ported in the- Dolliver.-afea: A by virtue of Chapter 491 of the Code ii IA^J *..!.„_ u- 4»ii n iu«nn v»irf As^tr nn thtt:\Kf • TW *' t?ntt'5 "fartYi. of Iowa" (1854)'. and Acts •AntehdatoJ'^ And when he rolls those big cow on tne .w. • m. -noss *f ll £t thefetd, a corporation known' fas Kos- brown eyes, wow!' exclaims about five miles- norjnwest ot suth county cheese Corporation,-and Barton "In 'Toby Tyler*' Mr Armstrong, was killed'When-a to- its principal' office, and'place-ot.bus* canon. in xooy lymit uvu i , .„ 2 06l f ee t O 'f fencing W8S Iness is at the City of Burt. Kossuth. -toto its body,;during-the cow^iow^ natire -^'; theibusln ^ s «- .'••,"'•.' ' " • to be transacted by^ this corporation * *;"-*,,- ,' shall*be to produce, purchase, Manufacture, buy, sell, .trade, f and deal In manufactured forms, of milk,-'and ,to and his perform- m e s 01 " 6 ^ 01 V 1 ? 6 ^ 1 ?,. ^anuuya. w ]eas Sen or 'otherwise dispose ,*!,«*,;; One individual frOiA this vicinity O f-real and personal property,-,parti- luman. Jd ^ Q f correspondence cUlarly In connection with the manu- nnnrcpmi "Vinw,trt become a rur- facture of various products from milk. "Although he is the toast of ihe a° ur ^ n i, Carrier" Government . T X an JS untA ^ ? api « 8 f• T8 ,! oc ™i ltt1 ] 0 f' - - - ' ai man earner . vjuveiiiiiieuu j^ed by the Articles of»Incorporation, 'proved there Was no such is 250 shares of ,no -'par,-Value, * which key full of more tricks than a of f barrell - of oeot>le He is " «,, «1 * mm, comedy foil for young Corcoran, the runaway boy who a star on his tornado. • , s i ic it ers were a .9 lty "£ CK1e f s - tw ? r ®ij some • of the ,ld almost * To all outward appearances War with-Mexico and all.'of thq dressing room door, Mr Stubbs "IUMP" bpfn^^fferVd leeallv for must" be~fuiiy" "paid for'in money" or things couldn't be better in Red Indian' wars combined. -No, few- cou ld, if he had the words, relate that ouroose A woman's organ-' property when such, shares are issued, - - 10 Union ' n ™ci «* t & o M , oc anv Wnllviurnnrl P 8 /..P ur P. OS ?' _-J^°f? fif.._ ="". ahd the.'same, shall- be' non-assessable. , : NATIOlf AL REPRESENTATIVE Weekly., Newspaper Representatives, Inc. 4Q4 fefth/Ave,, New York 18, N. Y. 333 N,. Michigan, Chicago ;, 111. SUBSCRIPTION RATES IN KOSSUTH co. SfejtfP' to a< t v » nc ? ' --- C7 --- 7 --- ---- - ----- * ---- fiJ-W .Both Algona pppers, in combination, per year , — ,?5.QO ilnpe Copies -„ ------ , ---------------- ^ -------- JOp ION RATES OUTSID6 ^ lgpna papers in combination, one year r ...$6.00 ^cription ta&5 t^an e months. OPf JQJAl, CITY AND COUNTY NEWSPAPER Pisplay Advertising, per inch ..^ — ,-. ---- ,,, ---- , 63o ' The-job could be done, economically anc fairly easy — in 1960 maybe? * * * PROBLEMS OF "RELIEF" ' ' Some serious questions are being raisec with regard to the expenditures of public funds for so-called "relief." v In Ney/_York it has been ascertained tha unrestricted... migrants from Puerto'Rico, principally, are swelling the city's relief rolls to astronomical proportions. They are alsp filling the city jails with young hoodlums. The slum areas o\ New York^w.here migrants try to live, are blamec for the • rejjgf. and crime-problems.'Some New Yorkers, however, ai'e pf the opinion that the , mass exodus into New York should be halted. ; ;ln the, south, and some other areas, it has come to light that well-intentioned efforts a "aid to dependent children" have practically re suited in the breeding of as many children as possible in illegitimacy — each one brings an extra monthly stipend for the mother. A benevolent and , somewhat, indifferent public is coming to life and asking a few questions on the subject of "relief." There have even ,been a few asked in this area. In the .past few days two employers of part-time h'elp locally have stated that their efforts to hire individuals have met with failure. The income from "relief" is more attractive, they sqy. One.man wanted general help requiring no particular experience except a willingness to work; the other wanted someone to be a plumber's helper, and not-necessarily calling for specialized knowledge of the job. So long as doing nothing is more attactive than working, the relief rolls will continue to be large — and. just as long as the general public is indifferent to the ,cost of maintaining this "relief" the abuses of a well-intentioned system will continue. * * • * COMMENTS ON STATE FAIR Winterset-Madisonian — Slate fair attendance down and in looking for reasons they blame the polio scare and the starting of schools. These things have an effect of course, but we think there are other reasons. Something like the diminishing activity in small to\yns on Saturday nights, People are just finding thing? more interesting to do; they lake a trip to Colorado, go to Minnesota and Canada fishing, take a trip to the Ozarks or some of the Iowa lakes. After these vacation periods which arc usually just before the state fair, spending a couple of days at the show in' Des Moines seems sort of too much to bother with. The lack of a t«ood farm machinery exhibit has quite a bit to do with it, too, in our opinion. RELIEVED THAT RUSSIANS ARE GONE Grundy Register -^11 is a i-elief for the American people that the Russian Premier and his big delegation were able to leave our country without any tragic mishaps. Had anything happened to the Premier or any member, of his family while they were guests of our country, a Third World War might hsve broken loose. There are cranks and Russian haters in our country who are bitter enough to try x to kill the Russian leader. The precautions that were .taken to prevent such a tragedy, while th<?y may have seemed overdone were wholly justified, There was danger involvec in asking the Russian Premier to pur country, bu since he was able to return home in safety good results should come from the visit. China. When ;• Russian Premier Nikita.Khrushchev arrived there and nine for the 10th anniversary of the death here. "Peoples Republic of China all was smiles. Word leading out of generals Confederate met the church's may seem fit,< or -as may; acquired serenity ana a lonaness, "«'"<=..."v «M«.I ««*»»»«...-..-,,,-£- ?>.;_" .^.iBi-mi for the simple .life. s He wears a organi Z atic»ns in ^ he ent a e ^e, anhul m, a past as teary-as any Hollywood izatio £ & a nearby town fwas The corp««5on'"5)™eTwdTi33ESS success story. ' " pa id $50 by a salesman when the ' on the aist day of- August, .1959, ana ' "Born in a Congo jungle, or- the group agreed to sponsor some its corporate existence is perpetual. —'—- •> phaned in babyhood, shipped to sor t O f. promotion. The'club got - be conducted by th^Boa^^f Directors AN EARLY REMINDER —It's a strange new world wmle still it s $50. okay, but the -customers, O f not less than one or-more than three that Communist-dom-inated land not too early 'to start 1 sending 'on cocoanut itiilk, raised .by 'got,stung. A church, also in this ' in'.number... The >, directors'-shall be shows that all is not well. Those Christmas _gifts",to American strangers in Boston Until sold-to vicinity, was surprised to find and shaUhoia^fflM^n«i their su™ poor peasants who were promis- troops overseas. The' big ques- a professional trainer — those that song books, t valued at $30 c^ssors'are elected and qualified. The ed so much under Communism tion is what do they need. The 'are the high-lights, or low-lights, which they received - free, had officers of the corporation shall be a must now have their.doubts; The 'USO asked the men and women of his infancy. " ' actually, been paid; for, by^$250 v™***^*^^ £«jffifi-furuSjrS- Red Chinese leaders have been , in uniform and here's the answer. "But, he is no. angry young worth of pho boasting how they would £obn >'They'd lake: subscriptions 1 to chimp. Along the way he'has by operators be passing up some Free World .home-town newspapers, pictures acquired serenity and a fondness, narne. .All other countries industrially' but things of sw aren't working out that way,".-i cookies _. They bragged - that they -would j telephone' produce 18 million tons of coal 'pictures last year. But they struggled ,-not like to reach 12 million, That-record- in PX'and ships stores such as breaking 525 million tons of grain watches, cameras^ film, records,'- Detroy, a showman' who, hirilike ^posea *or •f^ 1 B°n a vas11 > ""j- ant j E rv j n Purdeu" ; bf~BuTt. Iowa shall they predicted-only amounted to --cigarettes, "store-made" .candies his protege, has made a fortune arrangements had been compietea • be . president, - George', .Anderson of __ w *^ ,,_ * »«-•».•» ,t ,» • - . * . . * . . V\tr -fVir* f^Vi Qt"*lHa»» nr f 1 r\Vn*YlDT i f»O Tr\T* t /^n^lnvi tP«11*« TAiifn cVt-ill Ko tM*in_«Y'a^t_ 275 million. Meanwhile, .there -, and cookies. are other problems.- Every'year, • • 13 milliorf 1 'Chinese - babies are ! STAMP OF APPROVAL born. Finding-'" 4 , food,, 1 , clothing f When Uncle, Sam-stamps "O.-_. and she}ter i -for this explosive.! O n the meat you buy in stores' Disney .was looking for a chimp population '- may be mor,e', than'j you can 'be sure it's good to, eat. to star in 'Toby jTyler' when, he he Reds'^can .'handle. V7 <J ;"'"'i Nearly 100 million animal car-, saw - the act on television. He "'- •;•— o—»'-. • ' '.> , Icasses received the familiar pur- gave.' Mr Stubbs a screen test ',JOB^,PEPT*-5-iTeachers with plftst,amplast ypar. ,At.the same' and the rest-is history; Jie'juj-ge ,to"trlveWmight' do well < t$ie v ;the ,-Agricutufa,l •"-'-—--^ - - <r n-+—- - — .* -«-.». o look" into the national teacher ! Service condemned, "' xchange program., Applications maj* Carcasses : and . „ ire now being-accepted for posi- • parts of slaughtered animals as P. etr .9y.- _„_ ions • abroad ' next yeai- in 48;unfit for consumption. This is him! UNQUOTE. ountries. In addition to salary ' the 53rd year of continuous meat ransp'ortation is paid both ways. [ inspection. ' Inspections were :'Mr Siubbs belongs, io'-Gene this announcement — ".Santa .t.mv. * R v.r,wW, n TT «7hn tnViHiro. Booked For Algona Visit", but .Cedar Falls; Iowa were to sponsor the visit. CHECKING THE DINNER • TABLE — .The Department of Agriculture reports that young lomomakers • 'are putting out a nore nutritious' spread for their amilies than older homemakers,. As _ people get older, • the study hows, they eat more meat, joultry and fish until they reach >0 then' these foods level off. corporation debts and liabilities. ; , ' • -KOSSUTH COUNTY < . . .. . . . ,. - , .CHEESE CORPORATION ; A rat i thai caughi fire caused .- - . . By Clyde Johnson, anxious moments - - at the P. J. ' Secretary-Treasurer., Schiltz home west-of Bancroft re- ,'.-'•• : ' , (39-40-41-42) fo qua! if y-you must be an Amer-'made last year in-529 slaughter- newspapers purchased on the can citizen, have ' a bachelor's Jipus.es and 805 meat processing . degree and must have taught for plants in 546 cities, t least three years. .F,or further nforma-tion write: Teacher Ex- hange Section, Office of Educa- ion, Washington 25, D. C. ' Behind The Movie Sets WITH BUDDY MASON There 1 were average day last year than were purchased on the average day 60 years ago. •, -,.,,'" - .,, .,, , . ,, , - Hollywood, Calif. — Every so hey continue to eat foods made ; 0fteni a columnist--becomes a of gram just as much as before, delighted reader. In the welteu Younger, homemakers are using , 0 ,f press releases-thaf come to his more prepared foods such as flour , desk) one day he ^^ across a nixes, potato chips .cannedvege- . yaro which i s ' m0 re than a aWes and baby foods. While the ."springboard" for a story, older homemakers tend to maka j s more than ess use? of frozen vegetables and Tiik juices they make greater use of dried fruits and vege- , a inum , b er of closely related incidents from past pictures. ' • As you scan this release for rALGONA INSURANCE , ; •;••,• AGENCY- " J. R. (Jim) .KOLP Surety'Bor^ds r-JAll Lines V-, of Inpurance 206 .East State ..St. : . '• ""-Phone -G.Y 4-3170 ' T • :,'BLOSSOM INSURANCE . -, -, .-;-'> w '• AGENCY. -,,'-,-..-,/;. All -Lines,, of Insurance •-<; v ^ '. -Automobile -/Furniture Loan. 7 N, Dodge*- • Phone, CY 4-2735, news of current ^ee-Westinghouse Super Deluxe .production and more"than an?dd S e ° rmaticl desfaned fo'S^T ^=^S! s ^^^^ 3%™ d ?^& 4 5«a; 803-A Sewing Machine • BOHANNON INSURANCE IG NEWS is the revolutionary .„ ^ , SERVICE N.-- -t ». **k> ,/ Vy U* UV*tt4 1 \r\lt & J.V«V.U«3W .J-W J, \t\nnn 'useable material, you suddenly ,-ables, DRAWING UP SIDES we forget, there arc; 21,000000 lo the roali2a u on that you nen under arms m this so-called ar p be i ng entertained, The yarn era of peace. The United Slates . is ^one so cleverly that, some» n ^nnnn lllht ? r ^ all - esa of° untfo \' where along the way, you slop- S • '5 / nd i n^ SSU V Chl ?n9fin d -ped culling it for siuff thai would *eir Red salcWitos have 10,200,- fa you r requirements -and be- The neutral or mdepend- ^ ame an interested reader. Nations have 2,000,000 in ,,1 , ,, , ,_, chine designed to "do everything" . . . doing it simply, easily, with perfect precision. ' . ' As Low As $89.88 TERMS , Bjustrom Furniture Tfefff> IJl^h'olii S«yina that >e.op!0 qre knftwn by the company they keep/' Thf»t misht elfp »pp!y to other things, f«r initnn$9. mony of America's latest >ctvrar» vst «on?iit«nt i,, qnd so te|||^j|«tWfii;^r^^' , , apjiPiraa&^^rj-'.v • •, .,-. . .. , 'Wg-^t.'W^ 1 !'?^*' *; -;. • f . l .. , '.- ••.•'. " •?-' w" .; , TH1 AMKWA UPPER DIS MQINE5 iy Oyer 5,400 Fomilies Each Issue 000. ent their combined armed forces, This 21,000,000 armed force is spread out over 33 countries — free and- Communist. In the remaining 84 Nations of the world there are fewer than 100,000 men in uniform. BUSTING OUT ALL OVER— "'• Well, it seems country living will almost be a thing of the past in ' the not too distant future. By ' the year 2,00p, some experts say; 85 percent of the country's population will live within urban ; areas. To take care of this ex- '" pansion the Nation's 300 largest ^ metropolitan areas will need " about 55,000 square miles of addi- ,'"- tional land.— an area about the f ; size of Illinois, Forty years ' from now, these experts say, ten "•. super-metropolitan areas will; contain one-third of the expected 320 million population. ••, ' VALLEY QF"°DEATH — IF y' you're interested your Congress- .,:. man can probably get you a copy of a highly-interest book-" let put out by the Civil War Centennial Commission. It con- '" ' tains numerous fascinating facts '''" about that great conflict. Fqr -, example, an area barely go ^ square miles in Virginia, became ;• America's bloodiest battle ground. *^' In this one little section of land, • more th,an half a million men ? fought in deadly cojiibat. MOJ-Q, . men were killed and wounded in ''>this one place than wuru killed' fl1 woundtd ai the JRcvolutiuu- t a TF , 1 N. Dodge St. " Ph. CY "4-4443 ' Home - Automobile - Farm" • : f Polio Insurance ' --\ CHARLES JX PAXSQN. ; Dwelling, Auto, Liability. . , ' ' Life, General- ,Phone CY 4-4512 ';; ,\<, KOSSUTH MUTUAL .7! INSURANCE ASSOCIATION Over $74,000,000 worth 1 of insurance- irt foyce. A home • company. Safe, secure. Phone CY 4-J3756 Lolp gouffbanj. IOWA'S INTERSTATE HIGHWAYS COST WITH HERBST INS. AGENCY For Auto, House, .Household (foods, and. Many .Qther \Forms , Phone CY 4-3733 . ; . Ted S. Herbst ANDY QRAWFQRD ' 1 'Genjeral Agent Iowa Farm Mutual, Ins. Co, Affiliated with Farm Bureau Auto .-(with $10 ;pe,ductiblp) kife - H.ail - Tractor ' : Phone* CY 1-3351 HAROLD c,. T , State Farm Ins. Co," 706 89; Phillips - It's a matter of recprd. AS of tymi 19^,9, :&§; jjiHe '-cost of modern- Asphalt cqristruQtiQn phli Interstate HigJiwuys was 10,8% less than eo able cement construction, Both 1 'stlirid'' iip^e well, and modern Asphalt costs no more .to maintain « Pf you? <w/}fc4(ty# WGU$ ttk$ mp$Jjfof«/7^ this important issue* just smd a : request* fp the address -PALE W, Representative. , The Eguita.We Life Assurance. Society Of , '", < The yru'ted plates'.'' "'/• IQWI> .' Phone 801 Chiropractor Eta* D, P, Arnold Chirppracjtor Over penney's *• ft Hours:, &QQ Pr, William L. CJegg ASPHALT FAVINS ASSOCIATION QW JQWA 72O Grand Avenue f Pea Momes, Iow» E, Qi^^e St, ffouxsf 9:00 ^ 6;OQ thru Sat. 9:00 — 9:00 Friday Ph. Oil CY 4-4677 Res* CY 4-3465 DENTISTS DR. .PATRICK J.- MULLIGAN . . '- ; DENTIST ' 11? North-Moore Street , Phone',Cypress 4-2708 DR, KARL.R, -HOFFMAN .Office- ia-Home Federal Bldg, -.';..Offi5ei ; phone CY 4-4341 •_jL 1 ' 1 ! •. \ r < ! "•• i : DR. Jl B. HARRIS, JR. Dentist, New Location .On. Corner Phone CY 4-23;u , At 622 E. Slale DOCTORS MELVIN^.G.^BOURNE, M. D. •• 'Physician &' Surgeon 118 'N.- Moore St. Office phone CY 4-2343 •Resident phone. CY 4-2277 J^N/KENEFICK; M. D. . e phone .CY "4-2353 1 Resident phone', cy.. 4-2614 "JOSEPH M. H06.NEY/ : \. Physician : & 3 Surgeon ,. .;„ IH N, .Moore Office phone CY ,4-2224 Resident phone 'CY "4-2232 OHN"IOcH,yTTERT"M.D Physician 5? : ' Surgeon 220 No. Dpdge, Xteona Office phone CY 14-4490 Resident phone v ,Cy 4-2333 OPTOMETRISTS Drs. SAWYER and ERICKSON . ' • Kves Examined ' . _ Contagt .Lenses IJe^wng Aid Glasses % 9 : Easf State Street «u'-' - A te 8 t Iowa Phone CYpres§. 4-2198 ; 9;OQ a.m.' to 5;00 p.m. - Saturday Afternoons , ' , OR, 0. 'M, O'CONNOR ':. .. ' ' Qptcunetrist Visual Analysis & visual Training • 108 -South Harlan St. (Home Federal Bldg.) Serving Humboldt Polo Alto & Kossuth Countiei

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