The Weekly Pioneer-Times from Deadwood, South Dakota on September 13, 1900 · Page 8
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September 13, 1900

The Weekly Pioneer-Times from Deadwood, South Dakota · Page 8

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Deadwood, South Dakota
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Thursday, September 13, 1900
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GOLD MINES OF CAPE NOME. AN INTERESTING LETTER. try and mining, and are prone fre- j quently to assert that superiority. A J 1 Food Prepared With "r., The Crown Hill Company. S. E. Young. General Manager for the Crown Hill Mining company, passed thru Deadwood yesterday on his way to Crown Hill, where his com I Free from ftocf, Salt. I Lima and AmiT.oi.ia ""VM Fr.end. ' bright red from the Iron. Very frequently small nuggets are found with white quartz imbedded in the gold. From the facts that can he gathered it is not hard to conceive how th? glaciers moved in the direction of the sea after th emergence of the land, bearing huge burdens of detritus; as the glaciers were disintegrated by th. sua and by becoming worn away the detritus was deposited, building up til" Something of the Manner in Which the Deposits Are Found There. The occurrence of gold at Cape Nome. Alaska, is unlike anything found in any other part of the mining world, from the fact that the process of erosion in that region has nor been cHrrit-d le so advhm - a stage Since favorite method is to regale the "chee-chockers" with fabulous stories of experiences and strikes about Dawson anything to dim the glory of Nome and the achievements of the novices at prospecting and development. This has culminated in the invention of the term "Yukon liar. ' which is meant to apply to everyone who has come down Descriptive of a Trip to Central California. The Frost boys, who formerly ran a feed store on Sherman street, and who recently left for their future home in California, write the following interesting letter Jo their successor, Steve Cornwall by whose mission we publish. The letter is il I'M Ti pt i e of pany has a large group of claims. Mr. ioung has been devoting his attention largely of late to the Spokane mining property, which his company pur-rhnvd in the southern Mills-. Me mus that property lias developed the operation of the drift an a,,... ...,a i, .g. ..f ta- .... . , . ,. ... - 1 nAUr H T - ' n an an i NCNESOCOC au'eti' a. - there ha ai i !u;j ( ,'. ;i ii y I. i n ,,, ,,: ;,,,v l-.md I and i collar -hipn.ent.s a,- being made 'sv!).. ' '"!lri- ''"'' " n"' ".'"T ho.-K.-r,. in- ' V " their trip, and the scenery they pass and will doubtless intei.M the icad , .1. ,. ,( , ,1 ... . t.. i ... . -.. i . .- i. ... . ' eiuoi, . i . t ; r j - i In ;!,,!,.. -:ie -Iter .n H.-nw i tl ,.,i,try .-1 1 1 . ! i t - i mm ;i - ' " ' . m it.i.e ., .m-m ii mi a mat- . oKltVil.l.i;. ( in good order :i il . Aim. ::i - Ai:.v., , ,. ,,(.. ,, ,,.,t of the n.ii.e at Hie l.,i !, un I. ; the that - :v '"' " -""'""i. : " I'l'Msr !:.. i ' a..,, .u.i . -r. rd.iy , , .,,. ,,.,,) T!u. j. ,.. . ,., ......j ,i. .... ' "I ! :..-it. w II .. w.(! 1, - ;, n, i- . u' s. n -i t i , , n. -- V.V.W.W.V.V.V.v.VJ KVeM Iiodv i - u. II ..,.:!,. ppv v, ,- . , , , , , . , . , u , , , . , I,.,.; ,,, , iT . ,,,,, :;;iis ; , ,,,, i na u .. : a i n 1 1; - : . . t . -t om, wlio !,.,!,, j;. , ,. . aie i !i.,i, ei, .i v, !::. 'i , , . .. ,. , ., , . ,, ,,, -rl.. , , , ,, , , . ,; ; -.. .. , i :, ,,, -'-'..';:! i n a u -I ! l..--., .m i!,.- Yuhon , ii i i ; m . a :im i n - :-1 m. ; . ma ( .ll.ii ' e -ai ; W. ,i 'V .:a , ; li; , ; , , t ! ; : I. '' ! !.- , - ' ill- . h , . I.i . . ' ' :.''. i ' l!.i !'!- ' . ' ,; t,, .1 the f.. t. an.; ,,1'e tiuit ,v lie,-,.! . ' " 111 L III '. 'a. -ii 1 : ! 'a 1 " i' la : ' ' ' ,,,,,, , , v : . , ' : . .. Tl. n ., ' : - - . ' ' ' i " , : r -a a' . . :i , I : . - . : . 1', r t o e , , a ;i i , ,,, , ; . . . .. i a ' i. 'I I, : a ' i h n' 1 1 ! ' - -' ' !. i ' i ' 1 , , . ..'.! I : r': ' 1 ' ' : ' 1 ' ' : ! 1 ' '" ' 1 ': .!.-,,, : . i . , ,: .. , ., .A j ( h t ll- I r i . . i - . ' '' r'! on ' h a. ii in i i ' ' : - ' I ;,. . ' ! ; ' . la'' ' a i ; ; i a, ' ' . x " 1 " ' ' : . I : a !: . aa a I :- . I u , re - - ': I. . 1 a a , a, .. ; , . , . - , ' i. a ' ' : i a I ' ' ' ' ' 1 i ... j,a 1 , ii , - i s ,- n , j n , , . ; ,, . a,, ni . of I" i a , i a . , , . . . ... i a .... 1 i , , . .. a : ' ' ' ' " "t 'A: i 1 a a r - : - : ;i t . fl v-- or - for .i n a . 1 1 1 ., a a a a ., ,. ., ; -a i ,. ; a. - ; . . ; 1 ' ' ' ' 1 " ! v r ' i. a I Ira1, a a l a -; a -. 'I i ,. , i , , - .. t '' the : '..i a a ia a 1 : i tV , , ;,,,.i i , , , . . .;. i : '!: 1 a- :!''' - . . ; . , , i .-, ; . . , , , , , , i, , , ,,.,.;,., , ,. ''-'-' a mo US I toy a 1 ( loriaa ;- ,r. 'o be t la- Ii ii ; . , m I, ., a. , j, . ; 1 ' ' ' I : .u I i . a a: i a ; . a . -a. . ;, , ' " " ' ' ''' ' 1 ' e.-t. -c . i:- in the w. hi 1 1 ? a . , . , (mi t . ... ; i , ,.', 1 1 , 1 1 ! i ' .-;.....! ; ' ' ' ' ' ' '' ' " :" : ' , .. .. i .a p. a !.,, - " 1 1 int. m t:na bit of i. , . late. ! . la : , i.,'... . !:.:,, I . .. r : ,' ! , ;' " ' ' ia - . : .ay ia . , ,,,ril ::lon , i, ,,,,, .. , i: ''' i ill i i, I oi.l,' ,J. UJl I'.ia I'd ' 1 1 i 1 1 ' 1 ,(;. i.,,,,. ... ,..., ,. ..a !o .:, I .:!..;,; Ij : .h,., i ' 1 ' " ' " ' ' ' ' '' " ' ' ' ' ' ' " 1 " 1 'lie- '..IV 1 1 : . 1 1: 1 . 1 1 1 1 1 - -. " i l 1 1 ! I e I " M'' i ! a : : a veiy ui'.l and rouah nature. CI..,- ,;,;.,, ., ,jt- ! v ... ' ' -a . a I; a - .,,. , , , ,. , , J P ' " . h t ! ti.aK. s I he riilo the more pi. tu i- ... , ;,., (l. , .. - : . .-a ..: ., 1 : -:- ! ' : v '!'!. .M.miahf i- the o-nuitie K-kiim.j A"! "! ait.. and st ai Mini; is the fact that Ha-v . . , ,., ,1M,. , .,, . ... l i h - :. i i ,., V' ':' ' ' ' "' -a-phr.. ,, .,.,,... is ; I th.- Ilil's. , , shoot aro 1 those orners at a laiod ( ( ini, ... lV L ,, , .... .; Two a in I a lie a - , i. n t t . -. ,,; it . . - . : a : ' ' ' ' "' !- a ; ,. -, ,,. . .In ,i moil a- t la I a lia n- a ion - i ho u , . j 1 1 "!" : ' ' "" 'r L : forty mile , lip. el'fei tin:,' a . on, tan? ,, lh . . annm ; ', a ia : a a. -a. . -i.m . :., : am .-: al' ' " : ' ! ''' '"' " !' ' : l, . ., Th, lv j 'al sa vv tie- van I,- :, chanue of tuoi am and scenery. We , ,, , ti.. ,o-,i- tl. .,. oom . '' 11 ' ! '' MiK. :iv rii.'nlie raih.r in ... iLo.i Your b--t liaiii -.pie t!,e rood tail? We were just itoin:,' Into a sharp bend at one point, and meeting tin: engineer coming out, I asked him for law of toba. , o. but bo didn't hau- tin,, to gi e it to 111.'. We stopped o, r a dav in Salt Lake and sa. talk al. .al sport. Wo took a car out I.. Saltan h. a. h. .-ixte. n mi!, s and 1 a t ir 11 lor .' ". . 1 I - They h.n one of tin til..--1 pa iliops ill the world tiler, t he -Ol I o p! . e where ' o 1 gel a sa i I I and dam. a (woolen ia; laiv-iri.ne .'- i.-in- .! te.. Tai. of ih.ia.,,,a ,!..,,. ,: . J " ' '' : -a I 'I 1 1 .-n : a 'ii ,-. - Ai A , all u:th 10.,, ,. h-tf r advice th,,. f . j . ... ,,!-,ia. w,l j,, ,-. pi , u -t. .m jif 'hi' ha.. . r. ;a' d..ui ha ! j " " :,;ii' An an-id." is anv iia:ve do.- 1 1 1 ' 1 ' - !'iiihi. .. -- :,. ,!V ,e.!a...l to a .on, - . ' .ad'..,-.. M; I The Yukon Vernacular. n u,..a U :, ,i:at has ,,.., ' .lys.ep,i.,. ...... . s ,.,.,,, , and it i- not nnak.-ly . h.e : . ., -a. , h . i . n a.rj ,. -. ;...,e Heir ils.i'- 1 r'ie!it a from tl,.. -til..- Manv j I ae.imat im-,. i-iait.,1 ,.,, ,,. i ,omi , i ! eompaiiv will In' '! ep . n, t ' .!::..( as f; ., r...m- i .-a. h ;,.,,( j, ti hi : i ic.t.ti. r ''''- i"-i b am will be made up of Hoods Sa rsapa; ; I !.. ., ,,,,,, hoi.;,- ;i ha a I. ii - amount all",- a'- b. a .: I In, a a, ., . : a , - ! a : a a . i, n - in Tin foi in a i two or more d'tf.-r. tit kind of a n I j ( '"" i bat i"i, i s . a r- : , ,, ,,, , , ,. A i, , A ,, 1 1 nni ;. ni ai a b t lia t - i. !'. a a. i Tl.. ,r .-. a , , t ,, i , , . i - n n a n I , oini : I am- lt..i'.-. this i--it:ii dope to - ti I . ti - . cejits. v ,,;,,,! , v ;::,!,. na . v. x a- . ,r,i, , f.-m a .... . :. ' ' : a ' . I a- a . . I i, . , ,.,,1 a I a a n . . i , la 1 ' ! al ipialit ie-. Tla-iamv I .. i . ,, . .- ih.it1 ; - :i f. ,, i: ! i a , i or 1 1. : . . - , . a I ' : . i a -n 1 1 y a.a ml ii.ee- A poke ' :, la, i, -!. i n -a. , 'or i ". : h 1 : . Boston-South D.lkotl. I a ., ia ;.ava. : i. .,; ; ' .. ,:,wn; ,, , !: m w winds or d-i-t. aad wo:. ,- .n,,;,.-, : ..: , ; . , I , ., I I, I ..a-, .v .-.hi a. a a .T 1 . a 1 a , I a.l .- raia.-l ai l.n. a' , a : ' . ' ., a I a1 : a -. - nil ' ' 1 ' ' ' ' a ' one m. A ia -1 i 'Moan' .-. : a a ! . i , . .- ,, i .- a , '.a: ao.ii h I ... I-. a. i ',) a I, . i .ia.i :i i;- . ... : . . ! ' ' . a 1 I a n . t". . 1 1,, -. ! ! I U' r I ha t w a - , ,; i : n , I i ; a : ; , , , . . . . t ; j , . ; .. . you are tn,.. and only gel around I i,.u , on. p., i. 'A .-.s a; I ' a. I a ,,.. a ' 1 : i i , ' a lorn,. , a:. pea:;.;,.! ; Me aliau.. Ill . 'lie n.Oiv-.. 1 L a .,...,,, ,-, . '.. -.- m ; ... h -1 ; a . . .. , i... ...... i, :, , , . i ... . ...... ............. i i.. i .. .a .-i, . i.e. a . - ., ... a .. i ...... i . i .. , - , . . t u h e. Tin v hue a l ull or Loll I :. .-'I in I.I ! a . i a a in . .. ........ .,, ' . '. . .01 . , - 'II j ' - a , . 1 , I a .a . 1. 1. ..nals 01 w ni-ai, - la t!,,. r,,o,! 1 ... I :t:. v w ; ; 1 a .,, ... afternoon .m l , , nmj every day. an I the on! thing about the c om era the hai ge to1, is I ho li e of a bat bin g suit . II,.. 1 1 ills he l'oi.- ill I a', o ni. oit h- 1 a....- .oa 1 . . a b 1 1 1 . n la .1 ia.a 1 A I.1.-T..1 . . 1 . I ; la 1 nkon . 0,1 nl 1 ha .- --a nxai imn m 1!,, in1 i n a. ' la a t a .in t he a - al - i a i I ' -I-..1 .. i.. I ; I,. Yukon . ...i ni r 1, ,v in.. I ,,111 in the east on bus:- niar iap ilis a -i n .-omii :nto il, niit I h ai i - U -s -011111-.-. I 1 1 v ' o -, o: 1 ta po: 1 a ; .. .11 i - ma a t : ; 1 1 n: a , . I b u e. ,. 1 , 1, . a -I I I An i ! i 1 1 1 -. u . s j. -n i ii - th of lh and the surf. The water is as horn v ei l "in the native.; and It praitb ally marks where Bering m .i leaves oil and Norton sound b." lion, h and sell it for w hi-leA l,,- I ,, ., . ,. ..... ' I I.. 1! i ..I. Ill - Wellt. e .' ','.'- vhnh it is said to he a , subti- , ,. , ,, , , , . , at 1 .alena. Mini. lav n;a a th.,' tute, when propi rly 1 (impounded. ,:,t ... ..... 1 time since his return :i,aa ( uln at Nome it has ;vn place to re an 1 , , , ... , ' w here he went with a .- h aaa. nt n: '""lrhon. .Mr. ( ollins has been .ai i. e. ms a r ..a... .a . .. ,. . ,. the Canadian l-'ninh. Tile verna. n la ' of the Yukon is unique and almost unintelligible to the ordinary user of the queen's tongue. Vet in some in n. ss connected with his company. II. was in Boston two weeks ago. where he observed that the stud; market was slow, on account of the big slump in copper. The Hoston-South Dakota company's stances it is remarkable how nicelv " 1 1 1 1 ins 1 1 1 1 u 1 1 e 1 . iv i oiiic; The Ladies Iowa, for the past two months. for the navigator of the Alaskan coast. Above the cape the coast stretches westerly in a uniform course and with a regular beach line, to Port Clarence; below it bears northeasterly quite to Norton bay. This part of the territory is virtually a peninsula of itself, formed by Norton Sound and bay on the southeast, and latter, w ho is the father in-law oil H. Stewart, a salesman at Wertilei er's has returned to hl3 oli EMIT much of it fits its use. ".Marche." says the French Canadian when he desires to start his clog team. "Mush," or "Mush on." is what the later arrivals make o'f it it seems to be as near as they can get. In walking the streets of Nome no lit- as a crystal, tho it contains about 2-per cent salt and other minerals which render it so dense that it Is impossible to sink in it at all. The whole crowd, probably a thousand, goes in for t lit swim, not like the Hermans, each one for himself, but all together. You cannot swim much In the Htuff and it Is the worst to take I ever ran up against, but It la lots of fun. When the Mormons struck that country In 1847 they had a colored man with them, the property of Hrlgham Young. They went over to the beach and went In for a dip, coon and all. Upon drying off it was discovered that the coon Jial been turned white by the salt Irystallzlng In the air. The Incident .was promptly Identified as a miracle The pleasant effect and perfect safe-ay with which ladies may use Syrup of Figs, under all conditions, makes it their favorite remedy. To get the true and genuine article, look for the name of the California Fig Syrup Co., printed near the bottom of the package. For sale by all druggists. . .City Ian kwood, who h it l)..ai!ij Illacktail property, the Esmerelda, Is running satisfactorily, 20 stamps dropping steadily, with good results. 'I he ore has developed remarkably since the company took hold of it. according to the reports of Mr. I'nderwood and Mr. Corkhill, the superintendent, and the proposition is even now on a paying basis. Mr. Underwoods company owns a large cement property in California and is carrying on exten last fall for Colorado, i- at Luke Kotzebue sound on the north. It is Colorado, and is doing iiiiiiini: 1 on the Lake Citv Times. Mr, Ltd wood's parents reside at Kapi.l a and he was in Deadwno.l a y.-ar I destitute of any timber near the sea tie difficulty is experienced on account coast, altho a scruo fir is found 80 orjof the great number of dogs. They 100 miles in the interior. There are monopolize the dry walks, public en-no harbors above Cape Nome until trances as well as private, and in fact, Port Clarence is reached, and vessels. all thorofares. At the ordinary, "Get of great draught cannot enter there, out." they are immovable, but "inush," Numerous creeks flow into the sea, 'or "mush on," invariably starts them. more, driving delivery wagon for 'I American Express coiupanv. K-1 sive operations in that section. . o . Electricity1 for drilling. getting out a good column in !h- t it y limes, and it is ei b iittM' a nu some oi mem are gooa sized knows something of mining A Deadwood man who w. on the Pacific coast w a- doubtless in painful recollection of the thump and lash. This has gradually become to be applied to everything which it is desired to move animals and men, and it seems capable of application in several senses of meaning. In fact, it is urged by some that it be made a regular verb of the streams, hut bars have formed at tneir outlets, and none but the smaller boats can pull into them for shelter. Large boats must lighter their cargoes ashore, and that is only possible in favorable weather. (Back from the beach the ountrv RETURNED FROM THE BIG HORNS 15. F. Kinney and i-arty Get Back From Thermopolis. I). F. Kinney, the plumber, has returned from a two months' outing in Wyoming, getting into Sturgis the last of the week and coming up to Deadwood Sunday. He made a trip overland to the Big Horns in company with J. F. Henry and .Mr. IJonovan of tturgis. leaving the Hills July Jo. They drove to .Mournnfl. Wvoming. In n followed the Belle h'oiir lie nearly to its head, cutting a. ns I'iom there to the nolo in tile Wall iiiuntiy. Tin", had a waon and live hordes, four on the wagon an. I oin- tor the .-.chile. When they cain.e.l ai night ih. hob bled the woi k horses ami slaked out the saddle animal, with whhh ihiv , and rather grieve. a I press dispatches telling ..' of the big steel Am. a a Flint in San 1'ian. i-. night oi September s T; Vailed with coal I'l .a 1 -' rises gradually, terminating in a range Knglish language, of rugged hills, twelve or fifteen miles) ".Mush," or "mush on has a great bile going un the b.r. ' .a '- arow of the I. -if V h a 1 a phi ! 'hat I her., w .. get the crew- off. Til- ' the third largest -la;. tour-masted, steel slnar! ' 3 : i t beauty. She . at i vas to cover all the tin i. - " conntry. o Value of Man's L fe. .The supreme courts la. .- ',,e rounded up the others when ready to move. They had plenty of fee,l all decided thaf the life of th- a versa man is worth just what he is abli inland. It is impossible to see enoiish of the formation to form any ae urate com lusions without much work and study, since the moss obscures nearly everything. But there He numerous places where stifrVient outcrop is found to give some idea. Several quartz ledges have been Ton nil and excellent ore taken from them, altho it is difficult to determine whether they are continuous or segregated masses. Prospecting for quartz in the region is attended by much labor and disadvantage. It is impossible to study the float, owing to the tundra moss, which is so soft in summer that it is impossible for a man to travel far across it in r day. Everything is blind, or nearly so, and it is remarkable that any ore has been found at all. It is apparent in an instant that the placer gold in the country came from the direction of the mountains of the interior. Persons unacquainted with the fundamental principles of geology have expressed the belief that it was "washed up by the waves of the sea,"' and they believe the process of deposition is still going on. Such a proposi by the elders, but thin was soon proven to be erroneous by the shelling off Oi the salt. There still remains traces of Mormon power and Mormon energy as well, altho the old boys lost their grip several years ago, Gentiles controlling the city government altogether. We went thru the old Tabernacle a great dome building about two hundred and fifty feet across the base, with no support other than the curve of the roof. It is wonderful the way sound is carried across this room. A pin dropped an inch on a chair at one side can be distinctly heard at the other. One end is occupied by ah organ with pipes sixty-four feet high, made by the Mormons themselves. Standing beside this building Is the famous Mormon temple, probably the most costly church edifice in America. The workmen were all Mormons and worked without ryemunertfon and none other than believer in tbe faith are allowed to enter the temple. Interesting stories are told of persons who have gained admiration and Ceen carefully "removed" by the "Avenging Angels." Of course Jlmmle, who had stopped over in Denver, came along In a few days and photographed all these things for future reference. Our journey across the Oreat Desert was comparatively devoid of interest, partly on account of tho nature of the country and partly from the fact that the service on the Southern Pacific is greatly inferior to what we had become accustomed to on the Burlington and D. R. G. We struck 8acramen-'to at 12:30 p. m., and having a few hours lay-overchased out and looked at the town. Sacramento U a dead sort of place, considering the surrounding country, being only a few' feet above sea-level and consequently unhealthy. Afetr another short run of seventy-two miles due north, we drew up here, at a iA.tr MMAiHAu r t- earn. A man's earnings depend ti variety of meaning. Tho dog and horse drivers use it in command to their teams; if the presence of man oa animals is ohjei tionabie. they say "mush." When they walk or move over the divide they call it "mushing." Its "mush" over the divide, up the beach, up the ireek. or to the postof-fice or store. nen they come in from a trip across the tundra they say they have been "mushing." Any one who has been across the tundra in summer, or has walked the streets of Nome during the last few weeks, will appreciate the fitness of the word. Many people not familiar with the derivative believe it to have actually sprung from the sloppy condition of the earth in that particular region. "Cheechalko" is what the native Alaskans call a late arrival, or more literally, a white person. Consequently the early white settlers of the territory term all those who have arrived there this season "cheechockers," which is equivalent to "tenderfoot" in the vernacular of the western states. The late arrivals have retaliated. When the first rush from the outside reached Nome this year the earlier Otto Grantz Thinks Steam and Air Will Be Supplanted. Otto P. Th. (irantz brought ai k from Denver on his recent trip some literature on the New lira electric rock drill, which he saw in operation while there. He says electricity is undoubtedly destined to take the place of all other power for the operation of machine drills, and he thinks the New l'.ra the finest drill manufactured. horse power operates! it. it has only three working parts, it saves half the time in changing the bit. and for 10 expense it will cut as much rock as most drills will for $."0. Mr. Cruntr says ehe one he saw workiny was a marvel. It will run a hole at any angle, and was started out slowly at first, then gradully Increased the speed until it was striking 480 strokes a minute, and the bit waa going thru the rock about like a man would run his finger thru a loaf of bread. It Is run by a one horse power motor, connected therewith b ya flexible shaft. It Is guaranteed to work as well in hard as in soft rock, and it strikes a cushioned blow, and when not In contact with rock It is a perfect reamer. The electricity does not enter the drill, and Mr. Grants says it is so simple that any part may be taken out, examined and replaced in a few minutes. It is 150 and 200 pounds, respectively. Judd Grant, who is well known in the Black Hills, was the person who first called Mr. Granti's attention to the machine, and took him up to the company's factory, which is located tn Denver. There has been a tremendous demand for the drill from Colorado and all over the southern mining country, and the company has been unable to get motors fast enough to fill the orders. Mr. Grants expects to be able to demonstrate what the machine can do In the Black Hills within a short time. ereat extend nnon his health, and3! always within his nower to imlH his condition. The stoma, h Is measure of health and strength erv man mav be bright, active "I the way. and experienced no "trouble with their stocK, five miles being the farthest their hobbled horses ever wandered from camp. They saw lots of game, particularly antelope, which are seen in great numbers aroun3 the head of the Belle Fourche river. The Wyoming game laws are severe, however, end rigidly enforced, the country being patrolled by wardens, who are exceedingly vigUant while strangers are traveling: ttiru the country. Mr. Kinney and warty went as far as Thermopolis, vhere the famous Hot Springs are situated. It is becoming a popular resort, and the waters of the springs are said to possess remarkable feurative properties. Mr. Kinney came back with a complexion as good as salt tea tan, and he says the trip has done him a thousand dollars worth of good. happy, if his digestion is i It is Tint Hnatettpr's Stoma, il Bit"' will make it so. It mits the oreana in ennditlnn to nroperl. MP and assimilate food. Try it for 4 stlnation. indigestion dvspepsia. tansnpaa Itror nr kiiln.'V tronUf There is nothing just as good. lH genuine has our nrivate revenues tion shows a reckless disregard of the over tho noplr nt tho hnttle. TotH by all druggists. specific gravity of gold to begin with, settlers were found subsisting on an It takes bpt a brief study of the coun- admixture of sour dough and saJeratus, try to show that the gold had been! for baking powder was scarce and deposited with the detritus borne along .costly, and few bachelors make yeast by bergs and glaciers. The moraines . bread. ' Everyone, therefore, who has of the region are very pronounced, and are frequently the repository of considerable gold. The gold found on the wintered in Alaska is called a "sour dough" by the more recent comers. The two designations seem destined to M TtcOPCcsllsTpglng Chfldbearing is a perfectly natural function, but it is robbed of its terrorsvhere the virtue of "Mothoiu Fr4ond" V ' externally, relaxes all the muscles, so that beach Is well worn and rounded by , be permanent, since they receive popu-the action of the waves, with a bright lar sanction, even by the classes con-lustre. This is also true along the cerned. streams where the currents have acted There is another element of whites altho not to so great an extent In in Alaska those who have been there the heads of the gulches and draws, several years, particularly the early and on the tundra or bench claims, the prospectors of the upper Yukon and gold particles are more angular, and ( Klondike. Naturally they feel rather lack the lustre of the beach metal. The superior to the later arrivals In Arctic water in the sluice boxes Is often a experience and knowledge of the coun- iT&e ordeal is Easy wired our folks. If outward appearances go for anything, the country is all one could ask. - Everybody Is' prosperous and contented and enthusiastic about the climate and resources. Flowers are blooming everywhere and fruit of every description grows in abundance. ' "Each speech he makes adds ten names to the roll of our dead and a hundred to the Filipino dead." That Is what democratic ex-Mihister Chas. Denby, member jot the first Philippine commission, said of Bryan's an tl Sotdbrmllhrv I..c.- " "IjT l.M per fcMtl. .ct, tMothcrfcoat. 111''" VTtX BOLT, of LymwHe, low, write 'Mother Ftfagsd kM letiewd my wifaof H c.nmp.whi:h mile it wort tise saossey. - d firb, Kjlrd ft?- ,,,V

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