The Cincinnati Enquirer from Cincinnati, Ohio on September 15, 1991 · Page 125
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September 15, 1991

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The Cincinnati Enquirer from Cincinnati, Ohio · Page 125

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Cincinnati, Ohio
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Sunday, September 15, 1991
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Page 125
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Sunday, September 15, 1991 THE CINCINNATI ENQUIRER Business news1-3 """ri.UKhM,b NhAK MALL Deluxe 24 Unit Apt. Site TWO ACRES - ALL UTILITIES BUILD IMMEDIATELY (Partic ipate poolclubhnuse. Stock ownership. SIS. (Kill. I Land $125,000. LEASE OFFICE SPACE 1352 Sq. Ft. in West Chester Office Condo - Also Single Person Offices Call 777-0111 I Excellent finununx to qualified buyer. 371-3004 f (5 C Russia 40Meg HD .lMeg RAM 16Mhz VGA Monitor 1.2 or 1.44 FDD Soviet Republics Byelorussia Moldavia Georgl Armenia Tadzhlklstan Soviets CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1-1 trading blocs are seeking fewer internal divisions and broader markets. Roger W. Robinson, an international banking consultant in Washington and former official at the National Security Council, said that the clear preference of the U.S. government is to deal with a strong central economic entity. That view is reportedly shared by both private bankers and multilateral lenders such as the Interna j" Moscow I Not only do we have the PRICES you want... We'll back you with the SERVICES You Need. Networking Customized Systems ServiceSupport Training NCC Soviets face energy shortage BY TIM SANSBURY Journal of Commerce Energy production problems soon may transform the Soviet Union from an exporter of coal to an importer and later force it out of the oil-exporting business, according to a Soviet diplomat and an American expert on Soviet energy. Anatoliy Shurygin, who is attached to the Soviet Embassy, and Robert Ebel, a veteran Soviet energy analyst, said that declines in the output of oil, natural gas and coal, coupled with a poor harvest, could mean some citizens of the former communist state could literally be without food and electricity by February. Ebel is the vice president of international affairs at Washington-based Enserch Corp. The energy analysts offered their bleak assessment at a recent seminar on the outlook for Soviet energy, sponsored by Americans for Energy Independence, a group in favor of maximizing energy production from U.S. resources. : Shurygin said that although Soviet coal production was stable through the mid-1980s, two years of strikes and political struggle have demoralized the industry. He disclosed that an energy official in the former Soviet state, whom he did not name, announced last week that coal would have to be imported this year in order to meet energy requirements. In recent years, the Soviet Union has been an annual exporter of 37 million to 39 million tons of coal to markets in Japan, Europe and elsewhere. Total Soviet coal production was about 740 million tons in 1989. Shurygin said the equipment in the mines is old and broken and there's no money to buy new supplies. "Right now, in some coalmining areas, it's minus 5," he added alluding to the urgency of the home-heating situation. Ebel predicted that coal production will plummet this year to 620 million or 630 million tons. He also said the world's largest oil producer will see its production drop to 10.2 million barrels a day or lower in 1991, from 11.4 million barrels in 1990. Exports will drop this year to about 2.4 million barrels a day, from 3.2 million barrels in 1990, he predicted. Exacerbating the energy supply condition, the same problems that have vexed the oil and coal industries are starting to show up in natural gas production, Ebel said. To meet domestic needs for oil and to make up for shortages of natural gas and coal deliveries, "more and more (Soviet) oil (will come) out of the world market," the analyst said. iwin" X Iff 1 a totally different set," said Abraham Becker, director of the RandUCLA Center for Soviet Studies in Santa Monica, Calif. Experts agree that no matter what economic policies emerge from the political process, the Soviets must brace for a painful period that will last for years. "For the country we've known as a whole, it's hard to imagine anything other than a continuing decline," Stoga said. a: u .-t Jki: nfl Back by Popular Demand Mm Corporate 793-4141 Florence 371-4608 Computers M L u whatever t takes. ONE, CINCINNATI, NA Member FDIC 9 5 APR Thtse mtt an sublet to changr based m MB n tional Monetary Fund. "The IMF and the World Bank, know that they definitely don't like what they're seeing," Islam said. Observers agree that in the long term, the Soviet Union has the potential to achieve economic growth through reform. But their fear is that new divisions will only lengthen the period of economic crisis for as long as differences remain unresolved. 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NO CALLS, PLEASE. Your Everyday Resource 321 Cincinnati Classified. The only local resource that is updated daily, Whether you need to sell a Sentra or buy a BMW, Classified has what you're looking for! Just call 421-6300 HO i. .. application equiry loan detaih As of August 1 1991 If m Krrow up to $25,000 the rate is 11 A tht index. The maximum rate allcwdWr in Oho is 25. u What you should see is a great way to get a loan and actually over the phone and give you an answer within 48 hours, save money That's where a Bank One home equity loan comes If you would like to apply give us a call at 576-4444 or in. Not only do you get tax deductibility you also avoid closing just stop by one of our banking centers. hlgSnMP mere rViiir rm ilrl cpt vm 1 Vnrlr oc mi irh oc TSH Pli ic m lrnprcnn. hi ill cpp hrnr mi irVi cpnQP m ir VinmP DAAIMiX m VSlwC i r ii ai, proiessionai loan 01991 BANC ONE CORPORATION $ub(c

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