The Cincinnati Enquirer from Cincinnati, Ohio on September 16, 1991 · Page 42
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September 16, 1991

A Publisher Extra Newspaper

The Cincinnati Enquirer from Cincinnati, Ohio · Page 42

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Cincinnati, Ohio
Issue Date:
Monday, September 16, 1991
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Page 42
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D-2BusineSS Monday THE CINCINNATI ENQUIRER Monday, September 16, 1991 File away tips on getting organized Residential construction Commercial construction O'Connor In millions of dollars $80i l&J Working 60 40 850 750 650 550 450 350 f ij n n i miii" n .uj.uj jj yi 20' 0 A S 0 N D J F M A M JJ Apr. May June July scraps of paper hanging out of my very disorganized organization book. Clearly, it wasn't working. I guess I didn't have enough of a life to be as organized as that book would have made me. When the three months were finally up, I was relieved to return to my faithful 3-by-5-inch pocket calendar book. Here's the moral: If an organization system doesn't work for you, it just doesn't work. MAKE A DALY LIST. I didn't need such a detailed system for organization, but I did need some agenda for each day. What worked for me was to make a daily list of things to do. KEEP CURRENT. Staying organized is a gradual process. Every time you improve your system, you eliminate a bad habit. So keep at your system, keep improving it and keep getting organized. Got a column idea, question or problem? Write Lona O'Connor at P.O. Box 810091, Boca Raton, Fla. 33481. MORE WORK SURFACE. Because my desk is mostly covered by computer, printer, phone and answering machine, there is almost no work surface left, even after I had cleaned off the junk. I solved that one by adding a large work table opposite my desk. Big surprise: Given my propensity to collect piles of junk, I found that I keep the work table cleaner. That's because, by throwing out half my old files, I freed up enough storage" area so that I can actually store things on shelves. My worst fault has always been putting things down aimlessly but not putting them away. Then, of course, I lost them or forgot to do things. Now, because I have storage, I actually do put things away. KNOW THY LIMITS. This latest get-neat campaign of mine started when I was persuaded to start using one of those briefcase-size organization books. "Just try it for three months," the man pleaded. How could I say no? Soon people at work were cackling when they saw the random Throwing out junk gives you a fresh start I'm one of those cyclically neat people. So at those times when I get inspired to shovel out the mess in my office, I get born again' and write a column full of my latest tips for the rest of you slobs. (And I know you're slobs because many of you write to tell me so.) So here is my latest brainstorm on staying organized: I NEVER EVEN MISSED IT. While I was interviewing experts for a recent article on getting organized, I learned that about 60 of the material on your desk and 80 of your files can be tossed. I tried this and found it to be a very conservative estimate. Using superhuman control, I was able to throw out only about half my files. Now my file shelves are empty enough that I can read the labels The number of residential electric ;; meters connected by CG&E relied construction in Greater Cincinnati. (Black bars are 1 991 ; gray bars are 1990). The dollar value of commercial construction-including "''SS; manufacturing, educational, religious,:! administrative and recreational purposes in the seven counties of s Greater Cincinnati, on each folder and I can actually find a file when I want it. Added benefit: When you periodically cull your files, it's easier to remember what you have so you're more likely to use it. Before, I frequently would finish work on a project and then discover a file that would have been helpful had I remembered it was there. LIMIT STORAGE SPACE. Once you've removed 50 to 80 of the junk that you were keeping, you can control your tendency to collect more by limiting storage space. Then you'll be forced to decide what to keep. The best rule: If somebody else (your insurance company, a computer data bank, your attorney) keeps this information and can make it available, then why should you keep it, too? Job growth ! Unemployment 10,0001 9,000 8,000 J ;' 1 i 7,000 :5 : i 1 I " Mm 10001 Jjj 1 900 - : 800 700 j- $00 1 5 J il.i HiJI,,!h,,, 10 17 24 31 August 10 17 24 31 August Scoreboard The number of help-wanted ads in Cincinnati daily newspapers reflect job : Srowth in the local economy (black oars re 1991; gray bars are 1990). i The number of new claims for unemployment compensation filed in Hamilton County (black bars are 1991; gray bars are 1390). A tally of the last six months of trades by company officers and directors: Company Buys Sales Cincinnati Financial Corp. 6 0 Cintas Corp. 0 3 Cincinnati Stock Vehicle sales Exchange volume an option for 8,375 and sold 8,375 shares between $48.32 and $88 a share on July 1, and no longer holds shares in the company; Jerre L. Stead, chairman, exercised an option for 62,000 and sold 62,000 shares between $52.50 and $88 a share on July 1,1991, and no longer holds shares in the company; Gerin S.A. Merlin, beneficial owner, indirectly purchased 369,460 shares at $88 a share from July 2 to July 26, and now indirectly holds 24,229,554 shares. S.A. Schneider, beneficial owner, indirectly purchased 369,460 shares at $88 a share from July 2 to July 26, and now directly and indirectly holds 24,229,744 shares; Parisienne Enterprise Et Part Societe, beneficial owner, indirectly purchased 369,460 shares at $88 a share from July 2 to July 26, and now indirectly holds 24,229,544 shares.. Square D Acquisition Co., beneficial owner, purchased 369,460 shares at $88 a share from July 2 to July 26, and now directly holds 24,229,544 shares; S.A. Telemecanique, beneficial owner, indirectly purchased 369,460 shares at $88 a share from July 2 to July 26, and now indirectly holds 24,229,544 shares; Juris Vikmanis, retired, exercised an option for 34,900 and sold 34,900 shares between $48.32 and $88 a share on July 1, and no longer holds shares in the company. By tracking stock transactions made by key officials of the region's publicly traded companies, investors often can scoop up "inside" information on how a company is faring. The thinking goes that if a firm's executives are selling their shares, it might be a sign of future earnings disappointments and a faltering stock price. Conversely, if the officers are buying stock, it might indicate their bullishness on the company's stock. Trades reported Aug. 19-26 (all shares are common stock unless otherwise noted): Cincinnati Financial Corp.: John J. Schiff, director, disposed of by gift 19,721 shares at an unreported price on June 1, and now directly and indirectly holds 588,990 shares; John J. Schiff, director, indirectly acquired by gift 11,926 and disposed of by gift 1,000 shares at an unreported price from June 1 to June 5, and now directly and indirectly holds 655,337 shares. Cintas Corp.: Scott D. Farmer, vice president, indirectly acquired by gift 420 shares at $47.50 per share on June 13, and now directly and indirectly holds 131,690 shares. Square D Co.: Philip H. Francis, vice president, exercised an option for 15,850 and sold 15,850 shares between $52.50 and $88 a share on July 1, and no longer holds shares in the company; Dexter S. Free, vice president, exercised an option for 23,825 and sold 23,825 shares between $48.32 and $88 a share on July In millions of shares 3i 1 2.5 2 i.5 n n toll M T W T F 1,4001 1 1,300 n 1 1,200 j: 1,100 I 1 I; i,ooo i-ftM- ! !- 900 ;J I. eoolU 1 Hi U J a I I 14 21 28 4 August Sept. 1, and no longer holds shares in the company. John C. Garrett, vice president, exercised an option for 17,600 and sold 17,600 shares between $52.50 and $88 a share on July 1, and no longer holds shares in the company; Jodie K. Glore, vice president, exercised an option for 17,550 and sold 17,550 shares between $51.82 and $88 a share on July 1, and now directly holds 1 share. Charles L. Hite, vice president, exercised an option for 26,130 and sold 26,130 shares between $52.50 and $88 a share on July 1, and no longer holds shares in the company; Walter W. Kurczewski, vice president, exercised an option for 26,350 and sold 26,350 shares between $48.32 and $88 a share on July 1, and no longer holds shares in the company; Donald E. Marquart, vice president, exercised an option for 24,550 and sold 24,550 shares between $52.50 and $88 a share on July 1, and no longer holds shares in the company. Charles E. Quentel, vice president, exercised The daily trading volume on the Cincinnati Stock Exchange lor last week. The exchange is one of nine operating in the nation. New vehicle registrations each week in Hamilton County indicate consumer spending (black bars are 1991; gray bars are 1990). IN- Compiled by Mark Braykovich. Source: VESTNET Inc. 7u .wiumnifiiu-itl .itvir us a tiultrr t r.ntrd i,nl. Kevikiiif: Line of Credit Farilih .Hid I .case Line of Credit H.R,B., Inc. l imint iiiu .tmmuril ,uul mn . h ih- hiiI' imuiii iI FIFTH THIRD BANK anil FIFTH THIRD LEASING COMPANY Dim annmincemenl aiiean an a nultcr uj recited only. Thu announcement nimin an a nutler 11 ntW unlv. i aniuwii'i'iiv'tif af'ar.i a a matter reciml unh. 3400,000 Kquipment Financing $2,000,000 Revolving Line of Credit Facility and $1,500,000 Letter of Credit M78,000 Municipal Lease City of Covington DISTRIBUTING COMPANY TBM, Inc. and Setco Sales Company Financing arranged and prm ided hy the undemgneii ftn.mrinu nmmuil ami inn itl, fl h ihr unilmiunnl Financing arranged and iirmitkd by the umlersignnl. FIFTH THIRD LEASING COMPANY FIFTH THIRD BANK FIFTH THIRD BANK ThinkQfThemAs Economic Building Blocks. (0 FIFTH THIRD BANK The only bank you'll ever need!

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