The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on July 16, 1959 · Page 34
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 34

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Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Thursday, July 16, 1959
Page:
Page 34
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Compare the cost of Clabber Girl, ounce for ounce, with that of other leading brand* .. You'll be surprised! Clabber Girl is exclusively known as the baking powder with the balanced double action — balanced for uniformity in both mixing bowl and oven. BALANCED D»uble Action IM SETTER Baking CLABBER GIRU KCfK ON OKAMEmS PACKAGE PHOTO CREDITS Cover Photo by H. Armstrong Roberts; J. C. Allen and Son; A. M. Wettach; Donald K. O'Brien; Foto/Find. BECAUSE ... Ounce for ounce. Clabber Girl costs less than other leading brands! BECAUSE... Clabber Girl is exclusively known as the baking powder with the balanced double action... balanced for uniformity in both mixing bowl and oven. [CLABBER I BALANCED Double Action Means BETTER Baking CLABBER GIRL BAKING POWDER Yield: about 11 medium glasses (5'A Ib*. jam) 4% cups prepared 7 cups (3 Ibs.) fruit (about 2 sugar qts. ripe straw- 1 box{l%oz.) berries) powdered fruit pectin First, prepare the fruit. Crush completely, one layer at a time, about 2 quarts fully ripe strawberries. -Measure 4/j cups into a large saucepan. Then make, the jam. Measure sugar and set aside. Add powdered fruit pectin to fruit in saucepan and mix welL Place over high heat and stir until mixture comes to a hard boil. At once stir in sugar. Bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and skim off foam with metal spoon. Then stir and slcim by turns for 5 minutes to cool slightly, to prevent floating fruit. Ladle quickly into glasses. Cover with Je.inch hot paraffin. E women swing into our own JAM SESSIONS as fruits ripen and we begin filling our empty cupboard shelves with jam, jelly, marmalade, relishes and fruit butter. In planning ahead, we know well not only want sweet spreads tor table use, but jelly to use in tarts that will be tucked into lunch boxes, jam for winter-time coffee cakes. We'll need "fixings" for snacks and jelly for mouth-watering jelly rolls. Then there's our Christmas lists to keep in mind, and we'll want a few extra jars that can be shared with shut-ins. Our cupboards will be bulging at the hinges before our JAM SESSIONS are over! The steady flow of fruit ripening throughout the season provides interesting possibilities for variety. By this time, we've undoubtedly started making strawberries into jelly, jam and marmalade — but if we run short, we can always supplement our supply at a later date by using frozen berries and the commercial fruit pectin in either liquid or powdered form that we rely upon in most of our jelly and jam making projects because it takes ouj: the guess work and guarantees perfect results. Of course cherries ripen at different times in different sections of the Midwest but we can use either sweet or sour cherries in making cherry jam. However, well obtain a stronger cherry flavor by crushing a few cherry pits and adding during the simmering period, then add Ji teaspoon of almond extract to each batch before ladling the jam. Cherry relish is another good idea, too. Sour cherries may be combined with peaches in making a jam that's sweet, yet tart. Cherries also co-star with blackberries in another jam that's a treat. It won't be long before we'll have peaches, pears and plums all ready to use and here again each can be used individually by itself, or one or more fruits used together. We mentioned the use of peaches with cherries, yet peaches can be used alone in a jam, or by adding sliced candied ginger to peach jam you can come up with a jam with a piquant and rather unique flavor. Or you can make some of your peaches into a marmalade. Some of those same peaches can also be used with plums, but when it comes to plums, though they can be used in jelly or jam by themselves, be sure not to make the mistake of putting up too many plums without combining them with peaches or pears to give them a lift, for plums are inclined to be flat when used alone. You'll have many uses for pears of course, but a novel spread is made by using whole oranges with peeled pears and adding walnuts. Soon grapes will be ripening and we'll be making them into jelly, jam, grape butter, grape conserve and spiced grape jam. Apples will be ready about the same time and though you'll want apple jelly and apple butter, don't forget to make some Cinnamon Apple Relish. Remember too that you can replenish your supply at any time in the year, making additional jelly from frozen berries, canned grape juice, or even canned crushed pineapple. Actually your JAM SESSION can be a year round event. SPICED GRAPE JAM Yield: about 13 medium glasses 6 cups prepared fruit 7V4 cups sugar 1 2'A oz. box powdered fruit pectin First, prepare the fruit. Slip skins from about 4 pounds fully ripe Concord or other loose-skinned grapes. Add 1 cup water to pulp; then add Jl to 1 teaspoon each cinnamon, ginger, and allspice, or any desired combination of spices. Bring to a boil and simmer, covered, 5 minutes. Sieve to remove the seeds. Chop or grind skins and add to pulp. Measure 6 cups into a very large saucepan. Then make the jam. Measure sugar and set aside. Add powdered fruit pectin to fruit in saucepan and mix well. Place over high heat and stir until mixture comes to a hard boil. At once stir in sugar. Bring to a full rolling boil and boil hard 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and skim off foam with metal spoon. Then stir and skim by turns for 5 minutes to cool slightly, to prevent floating fruit. Ladle quickly into glasses. Cover jam at once with ?s inch hot paraffin.

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