The Cincinnati Enquirer from Cincinnati, Ohio on June 6, 1980 · Page 33
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The Cincinnati Enquirer from Cincinnati, Ohio · Page 33

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Friday, June 6, 1980
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Jordan's Companion Provokes New Gossip Martha Coleman Subject Of Probe KNIGHT NEWS SERVICE FORT WAYNE, Ind.-There are two mysteries for the solving: There Is a search for the sniper who wounded National Urban League executive director Vernon Jordan Jr. last Thursday morning with a single shot from a .30-06 rifle. Then there Is the mystery that surrounds Martha C. Coleman, the woman who was with Jordan when he was gunned down In a motel parking lot. The two mysteries seem at times to converge, like the rivers that snake to a confluence In this northeastern Indiana city of 200,000. Law enforcement authorities at one moment dismiss and then the next moment revive speculation that the shooting may have been a "domestic" Incident Involving Mrs. Coleman's private life. On the same afternoon that the agent in charge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) probe into the shooting ruled out Mrs. Coleman as an accomplice, Fort Wayne police detectives persuaded her to take a He detector, test "as a matter of professional thoroughness." PERHAPS BECAUSE of a lack of other clues to follow, law enforcement officials seem to be expending much of their energies rooting around in Martha Coleman's past. Federal and local authorities have said they have no Interest in her background, yet their Investigation quietly continues. Rumors about Martha Coleman are flying, but that is nothing new. Even before she Invited Vernon Jordan to her home on Fort Wayne's near southside before driving him to the hotel where he was shot, she was the subject of neighborhood gossip and the victim of taunts by children. Hers is a lifestyle out of step In a community described by one of her friends as "the world's biggest farm town." At 36, she has been married four times and four times divorced. But It was her attitude about race more precisely, her now-broken marriage to a black man and her continued socializing with black people-that raised eyebrows in her white neighborhood. Mrs. Coleman is white. "MARTHA'S ALWAYS thought they (blacks) have been the underdog," said Mrs. Coleman's 84-year-old aunt, Eva Braun. "She never thought they got recognition." Fort Wayne prides Itself on racial harmony indeed, It has remained calm in the aftermath of the shooting and black residents are important contributors to the local economy. But It is by no means a cosmopolitan city, and Mrs. Coleman's associations with MARTHA COLEMAN blacks were anathema to some of her neighbors. Prompted by the conversations of their parents, neighborhood children sometimes bothered her, sneaking up to her corner home at night to peer into the windows. A rock was hurled through the rear window of her automobile this spring, and a month ago her home was burglarized. Mrs. Coleman made a report to police, confided to friends that she was terrified, and had an expensive alarm system installed at her home. Adults, too, were often unkind. Coworkers at International Harvester, where Mrs. Coleman Is employed, gossiped that she lived well beyond the salary of a material-scheduling supervisor and wondered aloud where she had gotten the money to purchase four different properties in Wayne Township. ONLY A few close friends knew that Martha Anderson Coleman was the sole heir of a Huntington, Ind., farm machinery dealer who died in 1963. Magnus C. Anderson left his daughter an estate valued at $83,251, Including $70,221 in common stock, county records show. Huntington, where Martha Coleman grew up, Is a town of about 15,000 people, 20 miles southwest of Fort Wayne. "Folks here are kind of narrow about colored people," said Eva Braun, who still lives there. "There isn't a single Negro family here in town. Hasn't been." She described her niece as "a staunch Lutheran" whose "church comes first." She said Mrs. Coleman puts $25 into the collection plate each Sunday. It was in Huntington that young Martha Anderson first took a husband at the age of 18. She married VERNON JORDAN JR. shortly after her high school graduation in 1961 and was divorced within two years. By the time she was 26 she had been married and divorced twice more. HER THIRD husband was a Huntington attorney, Mark Mcintosh. A close friend of his, Brad Fahl, said that the marriage broke up "when Mark found out about her seeing (Robert) Coleman. The town was shocked." Huntington was shocked, not because the then-Mrs. Mcintosh was seeing another man, but because the man she was seeing, Robert Coleman, who also worked at International Harvester, was black. It was during her marriage to Coleman that Martha became interested in the work of the Urban League-but that marriage, too, ended In divorce before she became a member of the board of the Fort Wayne Urban League chapter. On the night of May 28, Mrs. Coleman Joined 450 other Urban League members and supporters each of whom paid $17.50 for a dinner of roast beef and a speech by Jordan. She had been a member of the committee that organized the dinner and did much of the work. MRS. COLEMAN was in the audience at the Marriott Inn's banquet room when Jordan rose from the small head table at 8:30 p.m. He spoke of the "dark midnight" of American democracy but emphasized his faith in the system. Mrs. Coleman, who had never met Jordan before, was one of those who gathered around him after the speech, and their conversation continued as they drifted toward the hotel bar, where she told investigators that they stayed until about 1 a.m. She told police that she drove Jordan to her house, about a 20-minute drive from the hotel, where they had coffee and talked for about 20 minutes before returning to the hotel. According to police accounts, Mrs. Coleman said she pulled her car to within 20 feet of Jordan's room and that as he climbed out of the passenger side, she heard a shot and a thudding sound. She told investigators that she thought at first that someone had shot out her rear window. When she realized that Jordan was hurt, she went into the lobby of the Marriott. CONSIDERABLE CURIOUSITY has been raised about her actions after that. According to the night clerk on duty, she walked up to him, calmly Informed him that "there's a man laying in the front parking lot. He's been shot." She then asked for a handful of dimes and went to a pay telephone to call her lawyer. Mrs. Coleman's calm detachment from the scene has led some Investigators to speculate that she and Jordan might have partaken of a substance other than coffee during the 20 or more minutes they spent at her home. In fact, police are Investigating; Mrs. Coleman's past associations with a motorcycle enthusiast known locally as "G-man," who county and city law enforcement officials suspect of dealing In marijuana, cocaine and amphetamines. Fort Wayne police called him in for questioning in the case Thursday. A long-time friend of Mrs. Coleman, Tony Rodriguez, defended her actions on the night of the shooting. "She's a very calm, poised person," he said. Rodriguez and another friend of hers, Claud Sigman, 45, both ridiculed the notion that Jordan might have been shot by someome jealous over Mrs. Coleman. "If it had been that," Sigman said, "they sure . . . would have shot me a long time ago . . . She and I had been good friends a long time." RODRIGUEZ, A manager of a Fort Wayne bar, described Mrs. Coleman as a "stay-at-home type, a little on the shy side." Some people speculated it was shyness that prompted her to go into hiding right after the shooting. However, police now say that she remained out of the public eye on their advice. "If Mrs. Coleman Is not suspected of being an accomplice," a reporter asked at a combined police-FBI press conference here this week, "then why do you care about her personal life?" There was silence from FBI agent Wayne Davis and Ernest Walters, assistant Fort Wayne police chief, before the city's mayor, Wlnfleld Moses, finally answered. "We don't," he said. But they do. Most of her neighbors always have. . i i j(Q) - m' ' i mim iiiiinfn -L ;,jMf. inn pjMMMMMjBWl. AP Laserptoto THE SHRIMPER Americana, seen from a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter, makes its way toward Key West with a heavy load of refugees Thursday. Freedom Flotilla Winds Down As 1800 More Refugees Arrive FROM ENQUIRER WIRES KEY WEST, Fla.-Except for some straggling -and haggling - it's all over for the Freedom Flotilla. By midafternoon Thursday, 47 boats carrying 1,837 refugees arrived In Key West, leaving fewer than two dozen boats In Marlel. Most of those were expected to return Friday. "After that there might be some stragglers come In," said Tom Casey, Federal Emergency Management Agency co-ordinator. The Miami Herald made radio contact with an American shrimp boat captain in the Cuban harbor Thursday who said only two shrimpers and about 20 smaller boats remained. The large 110-foot Cuban gunboat that once had kept boats from leaving Mariel until loaded with refugees, he said, has been replaced by a small launch. "I don't think they're too worried about these boats trying to leave the harbor," said Capt. Walter Noyes of the Miss Too Nicey at Marlel. MORE SHAVEN-HEADED prisoners emptied from Cuban Jails arrived Thursday, as Casey tried to play down their numbers. He insisted that "close questioning" of the more than 4,000 refugees who arrived Wednesday showed that the percentage of prisoners among the recent arrivals wasn't increasing. "The number of people who have been in Jail Is still holding up at about 25," he said. "Our main concern Is the 1 we are finding guilty of heinous crimes." ' But a Customs official who refused to be Identified indicated the criminal percentage was much higher than Casey believed. Watching the arrival of the Ventura, a 35-foot pleasure boat carrying about 35 obvious recent prisoners, he said they looked "pretty bad.". "They are well-behaved," he said, "but most are still mostly criminals." It concerns the Cuban-American volunteers who are helping process the refugees, too. "At the end of the boatllft, we have found that the families we went to pick up are still in Cuba without work, without homes, and clearly identified as enemies of the regime," said volunteer Arturo Cobo. "Instead, many of those who came out are prisoners. Castro once again has made fools of us." Casey, though, argued that the prisoners included former political prisoners and those convicted for crimes that aren't penalized In this country. MEANWHILE, IN Washington, President Carter, stung by the open defiance of his ban on refugee boat traffic from Cuba, said on Thursday that a freighter that landed at Key West, Fla., with 731 Cuban refugees aboard had been seized and those who tried to evade the law would pay "very severe penalties." In a strongly worded statement issued by the White House, the President declared: "Illegal boat traffic in refugees is unacceptable to the United States. It will be stopped. Any ship-owner, captain or crewmember agreeing to travel from U.S. or foreign ports to Cuba to take refugees to the U.S. In violation of American immigration law will face the most severe penalties under the law. "Ships engaged in such efforts will be seized regardless of the nation of registry. Ship captains will face criminal prosecutions and maximum civil fines. Those who charter boats for these purposes will also face criminal prosecution." Penalties for aiding and abetting a conspiracy to smuggle aliens into the United States Include prison sentences of up to five years and fines of up to $2,000 per alien brought Into the U.S. China's Boss, Deng Announces He Will Quit Office, Posts Vice Premier's Intentions Viewed As Unprecedented 1980, THE LOS ANGELES TIMES SHANGHAI Deng Xioping, China's most Influential leader and the driving force behind its modernization campaign, announced Thursday that he will resign as vice premier this summer and retire from all his government and Communist Party posts by 1985. Deng's plans to retire, which were disclosed to American newsmen in a rare 90-minute Beijing press conference, are unprecedented in a country where top rulers have traditionally clung to their offices until they died, despite failing health. Both of the Communist regime's most illustrious leaders, party chairman Mao Zedong and Premier Zhou Enlai, scorned retirement and died in office. But the 75-year-old Deng, always a maverick, apparently has decided that a retirement system must be implemented so that when his generation passes, China can be spared a recurrence of the devastating political struggle that followed the 1976 deaths of Mao and Zhou. And Deng, though healthy, may be growing more aware of his advanced age. "I WANT to give up my vice premier's post so that I can get rid of some of my routine duties and concentrate on Important matters in the time I have left," Deng declared to a visiting delegation of American editorial writers. They were Joined by Beijing-based foreign correspondents. He plans to submit his resignation to the National People's Congress, the Chinese legislature, when it convenes in August, Deng said, adding; "Of course, I don't know whether they'll accept it. That must be decided democratically." As part of the retirement system he is advocating, Deng said a five-year limit would be Imposed on the terms of the party chairman and vice-chairmen, the real powers in this party-dominated country. Provincial party chiefs would be limited to three years In office. In the wide-ranging press conference, Deng also praised the U.S. Department of State's announcement that it is abandoning its even-handed approach toward China and the Soviet Union. The official declaration that the Carter administration will no longer treat the Communist giants equally, a policy that has been emerging for the past six months, was made Wednesday by Assistant Secretary of State Richard Holbrooke In a speech to the National Council on U.S.-China Trade. "WE WELCOME this change of police," Deng said. The Chinese had been offended by suggestions that the United States has been pursuing relations with Beijing only to pressure Moscow. The Chinese do not yet regard Americans as allies, Deng said, but hope the United States, Japan, Western Europe and the Third World "will unite with China to cope with Soviet hegemonism," China's catchword for Soviet expansion. "China is a poor country, a weak country, but it is not insignificant," he said. "We have a very sober assessment of our weight in the world situation, and the role we can play. We are ahead of some in that we long recognized that the main threat of war conies from the Soviet Union." THE CINCINNATI ENQUIRERFriday, June 6 1980 C-5 LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE TO PUBLIC OF REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS June 2, W80 City of Cincinnati 801 Plum Street, City Hall Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 ( 513) 352 3476 TO ALL INTERESTED AGENCIES, GROUPS AND PERSONS. On or about June 20, 1980, the City ot Cincinnati will request the U S Department of Housing and Urban Development to release Urban Development Action Grant (UDAO) funds under the Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (PL 93-383) for the UNION TERMINAL An Environmental Review Record respecting the aforemention ed proiect has been made by the City ot Cincinnati which documents the environmental review of the project i ne environmental Keview Kecoro is on tile at the above address and is available for public examination and copying, upon request The City of Cincinnati wilt undertake the project described above in uroan ueveioomeni Acnon Grant (UDAG) funds from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), under Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974. The Gtv of Cincin nati is certifying to HUD that The City of Cincinnati and Mr. Sylvester Murray in his official capacity as City Manager, consent to accept (he jurisdiction of the Federal courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibil- ties in relation to environmental eviews, decision making, and action, and that these responsibilities have been satisfied The legal effect of the certification is that upon its approval, The City of Cincinnati may use the lUOAb) iunds, and hud win have satisfied its responsibilities under the National Environmental Policy Act of mt. mud win accept an ooiecTion to it j approval of the release of funds jnd acceptance ot the certification only if it is on one of the following bases: ( a ) That the certification was not in fact executed by the chief executive officer or other officer ot applicant approved by HUD; or (b) that applicant's environmental review record for the proiect indicates omission of a reauired Process. Objections must be prepared and suominea in accordance wnn ine re quired precedure (24 CFR Part 58), and may be addressed to HUD at 200 N. High Street, Columbus, Ohio 43215 Objections to the release of funds on bases other than those stated above will not be considered by HUD. No obiection received after July 7, 1980 will be considered by HUD. By Order of Sylvester Murray City Manager City of Cincinnati, Ohio NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT EFFECT ON THE ENVIRONMENT JUNE 2, 1980 City of Cincinnati 801 Plum Street, City Hall Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 (513 ) 352-3478 TO ALL INTERESTED AGENCIES, GROUPS AND PERSONS: The City of Cincinnati proposes to request from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to release Urban Development Action Grant Funds (UDAG) under Title I ot the Housing and Community Development Act ot 1974 (PL 93-383) to be used for the rehabilitation and restoration of the UNION TERMINAL. It has been determined that such request for release of funds will not constitute an action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment ana, accordingly, the City of Cincinnati has decided not to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (PL 91-190). An Environmental Review Record respecting the aforementioned project has been made by the City ot Cincinnati which documents the environmental review of the project and sets forth reasons why an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. The Environmental Review Record is on file at the above address and is available for public examination upon request at Room 228 between the hours of 8 00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M. All interested agencies, groups and persons disagreeing with this decision are invited to submit written comments for consideration by the City to the Office of City Planning, Room 228, City Hall. Such written comments should be received on or before June 20, 1980. All such comments so received will be considered and the City wiM not take any administrative actions on the aforementioned protect prior to the date specified in the preceding sentence. By Order of: Sylvester Murray City Manager City of Cincinnati, Ohio NOTICE TO PUBLIC OF REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS City of Cincinnati 801 Plum Street, City Hall Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 (513) 352-3478 TO ALL INTERESTED AGENCIES, GROUPS AND PERSONS: On or about June 20, 1980 the City ot Cincinnati wiH request the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to release Federal funds under Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (PL 93-383) for the following projects: Included as part of its 1979 Community Development Block Grant, Local Option Program. Project Number 96390 WALNUT HILLS MONTESSORI CHILD CARE CENTER Conversion and rehabilitation ot City-owned property for use as child care center, (Walnut Hills ) Project Number 93064 WAVERLY AVENUE DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS street widening, with curb and gutter installation. (South Fair-mount) An Environmental Review Record respecting the aforementioned projects has been made by the City ot Cincinnati which documents the environmental review ot the projects. The Environmental Review Record is on file at the above address and is available for public examination and copying, upon request. The City of Cincinnati wilt undertake the projects described above with Block Grant funds from the U S Department ot Housing and Urban Development (HUD), under Title I ot the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, The City of Cincinnati is certifying to HUD that The City of Cincinnati and Mr. Sylvester Murray in his official capacity as City Manager, consent to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal courts if an ac tion is brought to enforce responsible ties in relation to environmental reviews, decision making, and action, and that these responsibilities have been satisfied. The legal effect of the certification is that upon its approval The City of Cincinnati may use the Block Grant funds, and HUD will have satisfied its responsibilities under the National Environmental Policy Act ot 1969, HUD wiH accept an objection to its approval ot the release of funds and acceptance ot the certification only it it is on one ot the following bases: (a) That the certification was not in fact executed by the chief executive officer or other officer of applicant approved by HUD, or (b) that applicant's environmental review record for the project indicates omission ot a required decision, finding, or step applicable to the project in ihe environmental review Process. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required precedure (24 CFR Part 58), and may be addressed to HUD at 200 N. High Street, Columbus, Ohio 432 IS Objections to the release of funds on bases other than those stated above will not be considered by HUD. No obiection received after July 7, 1980 wiH be considered by HUD. By Order of Sylvester Murray City Manager City of Cincinnati, Ohio NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT EFFECT ON THE ENVORONMENT City ot Cincinnati B01 Plum Street, City HaN Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 (513) 352-3478 TO ALL INTERESTED AGENCIES, GROUPS AND PERSONS: The City of Cincinnati proposes to request the U.S. Department ot Housing and Urban Development to release Federal funds under Title I ot the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (PL 93-383) to be used for the following projects included as part of its 199 Community Development Block Grant, Local Option Program. Proiect Number 96390 WALNUT HILLS MONTESSORI CHILD CARE CENTER conversion and rehabik-ati'- of City-owned property for use as child care center, (walnut Hills). Protect Number 93064 WAVERLY A ,'FNUE DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS - sireet widening, with curb and gutter installation, (south Fair-mount) It has been dptwmined that such request for release of funds wiH not constitute an action s;?ntficantly at-fecting the quality of the human environment and, accordingly, the City of Cincinnati has decided not to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act Ot 1969 (PL 91-190). The City hereby reaffirms its obligations under Section 106 ot the National Historic Preservation Act ot 1966, and Executive Order 11593, and through consultation with the Ohio State Historic Preservation Office and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, the City h in the process of establish a programmatic memorandum of agreement tor its Community Development Block Grant Program. Notwithstanding the execution of the programmatic memorandum of Agreement, the uiy is proceeoina lowaros compie tion of its Section 106 Compliance Re views for the aforementioned proiects which are subied to such re views. An Environmental Review LEGAL NOTICES Record respecting the atoremention ad proiects has Been made by the City ot Cincinnati which documents the environmental review of the proiects and sets forth reasons why an Environmental Impact Statement is not required The Environmental Review Record is on file at the abovp address and is available for public examination upon request at Room 228 between the hours of 8 00 AM and 5 00 P M All interested agencies, groups and persons disagreeing wtfh this decision are invited to submit written comments tor consideration by the City to the office of City Planning, Room 228, City Hall Such written comments should be received on or before June 20, 1980 All such comments so received will be considered and the City will not take any administrative actions on the aforementioned proiects prior to the date specified in the preceding sentence By Order ot Sylvester Murray City Manager City ot Cincinnati, Ohio NOTICE TO PUBLIC OF REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS Cityot Cincinnati 801 Plum Street, City Hall Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 (513) 352-3478 TO ALL INTERESTED AGENCIES, GROUPS AND PERSONS: On or about June 20, 1980, the City ot Cincinnati will request the U S Department of Housing and Urban Development to release Federal funds under the Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (PL 93-383) for the Wowing projects Included as part of its 1980 Community Development Block Grant Program Project Number: 10 Industrial Land Acquisition purchase ot available land from Government Services Administration and State of Ohio tor redevelopment (Bond Hill, Paddock Hills). II. Industrial Neighborhood public Improvements improvements to streets and public utilities in deteriorated industrial areas (Queensgate, Camp Washington). 17 Melish Avenue Extension acquisition and relocation for Cross-town Thoroughfare system connecting Melish Avenue at Gilbert Avenue to Madison Road at Victory Parkway. (Walnut Hills). 20. Low Income Recreation Center Renovation rehabilitation and'or expansion ot several City-operated indoor recreation facilities. (Winton Hills, Carthage, California, East End, west tna, camp wasnmqion 1. 23 Taft Playtield Redevelopment Project acquisition, relocation and clearance of blighted property adia-' cent to Taft High School. (West End ). 24 Low Income Neighborhood Facilitiesrepair and or renovation of neighborhood facilities. (East End, East Price Hill, Lower Price Hill, Madisonville, West End). 25. New Neighborhood Health Centers development of two public health clinics. (Over-The-Rhine). 26. Avondale Housing Re valuation Area renovation of two neighborhood facilities, housing programs including incentive loans, grants, homesteading recycling HUD-held properties and street improvements (Avondale). 30. Northside Housing Revitaliza-tion Area-improvement to neigh- , borhood recreation center, housing rehabilitation incentive grants, relo- i cation and clearance activities (Northside). 31. Northside Commercial Revital-iiation Area additional off-street parking, streetscape improvements, rehabilitation loans and clearance. (Northside). 32 Queensgate II Housing Revital-iiation Area public improvements including open space, parking and street rehabilitation, Housing loans and grants, and clearance. (West End). 33. 0'Bryonville Commercial Revl-talization area-provision of additional off-street parking, traffic signalua-tion, street imporvemenfs and commercial rehabilitation and'or facade renovation, (O'Bryonville). 34. West Fourth Street NSA acquisition, relocation, street cape improvements, and Revelving Loan Fund. (CBD). An Environmental Review Record respecting the aforementioned projects has Been made by the City of Cincinnati which documents the environmental review of the projects. The Environmental Review Record is on file at the above address and is available for public examination and copying, upon request. The City of Cincinnati wiH undertake the protects described above with Block Grant funds from the U S Department ot Housing and Urban Development (HUD), under Title I ot the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974. The City ot Cincinnati is certifying to HUD that The City of Cincinnati and Mr. Sylvester Murray in his official capacity as City Manager, consent to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to environmental reviews, decision making, and action and that these responsibilities have been satisfied. The legal effect of the certification is that upon its approval, The City of Cincinnati may use the Block Grant funds, and HUD will have satisfied its responsibilities under the National Environmental Policy Act ot 1969. HUD will accept an obiection to its approval ot the release of funds and acceptance of the certification only if it is on one of the following bases: (a) That the certification was not in fac' executed by the chief executive officer or other officer of applicant approved by HUD; or lb) that applicant's environmental review record for the protect indicates omission of a required decision, finding, or step applicable to the protect in the environmental review Process Obiections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required precedure (24 CFR Part 58), and may be addressed to HUD at 200 N. High Street, Columbus, Ohio 43215 Obiections to the release ot funds on bases other than those stated above will npt be considered by HUD. No obiection received after July 7, 1980 will be considered by HUD. By Order of Sylvester Murray City Manager City ot Cincinnati, Ohio NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT EFFECT ON THE ENVIRONMENT City ot Cincinnati 801 Plum Street, City Hall Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 (513) 352-3478 TQ ALL INTERESTED AGENCIES, GROUPS AND PERSONS: The City of Cincinnati proposes to request the U S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to release Federal funds under Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act ot 1974 (PL 93-383) to be used for the following proiects included as part ot its 19a0 Community Development Block Grant Program. Project Number: 10. Industrial Land Acquisition-purchase ot available land from Gov ernment Services Administration and State of Ohio for redevelopment (Bond HID, Paddock Hills). 1 1. Industrial Neighborhood Public Improvements-improvements to streets and public utilities in deteriorated industrial areas (Queensgate, Camp Washington). 17. Melish Avenue Extension-acquisition and relocation for Cross-town Thoroughfare system connecting Melish Avenue at Gilbert Avenue to Madison Road at Victory Park way. (Walnut Hills). 20 Low Income Recreation Cen ter Renovation-rehabilitation and or expansion of several City-operated indoor recreation facilities (Winton Hills, Carthage, California, East End, West End, Camp Washington) 23 Taft Playfiek) Redevelopment Project acquisition, relocation and clearance ot blighted property adia-cent to Taft High School. (West End ) 24, Low Income Neighborhood Facilitiesrepair and'or renovation ot neighborhood facilities. (East End, East Price Hill, Lower Price Hill, Madisonville, West End) 25 New Neighborhood Health Centers development of two public health clinics. (Over-The-Rhtne). 26 Avondale Housing Revitahza-tion Area renovation ot two neigh borhood facilities, housing programs including incentive loans, grants, homesteading recycling HUD-held properties and street improvements (Avondale). 30 Northside Housing Revltaliia-tion Area improvement to neighborhood recreation center, housing rehabilitation incentive grants, relocation and clearance activities (Northside). 31 Northside Commercial Revital-iiation Area - additional off-street parking, streetscape improvements, rehabilitation loans and clearance INorthside). 32 Queensgate II Housing Revital iiation Area-public improvements including open space, parking and street rehabilitation. Housing loans and grants, and clearance. (West End) 33 O'Bryonville Commercial Revi taluafion Area - provision of additional off-street parking, traffic signals ation, street improvements and commercial rehabilitation and or facade renovation (OBryonviHe). 34 West Fourth Street NSA -acquisition, relocation, streetscape improvements, and Revolving Loan Fund (CBD). It has been determined that such request for release of funds will not constitute an action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment and, accordingly, the City of Cmcinnali has decided not to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of I969(PL91-IW) The City hereby reaffirms its 0W1 nations under Section 106 ot the Na fional Historic Preservation Act ot 1966, ar c . 'ive Order ' 593, and through consult et:" with the Ohio State Historic Preservation Office and the Advisory Co on Historic LEGAL NOTICES Preservation, the City is m the process ot establishing a programmatic memorandum of agreement tor its Community Development Block Grant Program Notwithstanding the en ecu tion ot fhe programmatic memorandum ot Agreement, the City is proceeding towards completion ot its Section 106 Compliance Reviews for the aforementioned protects which are subiect to such reviews An Environmental Review Record respecting the aforementioned proiects has been made by the City ol Cincinnati which documents the environmental review of the protects and sets forth reasons why an Environmental Impact Statement is not required The Environment Review Record is on file at the above address and is available for public examination upon request at Room 228 between the hours ot 8.00 AM and 5 00 P M. All interested agencies, groups and persons disagreeing with ths decision are invited to submit written comments tor consideration by the City to the office of City Planning, Room 2?B, City Hall. Such written comments should be received on or before June 20, 1980 All such comments so received will be considered and the City will not take any administrative actions on the aforementioned protects prior to the date specified m the preceding sentence. By Order of Sylvester Murray City Manager City ot Cincinnati, Ohio 135564 34 EMPLOYMENT SERVICES AND CONSULTANTS BAKER PERSONNEL 414 Walnut St 421-1530 BUSINESS AID BOB Vine 241-1312 careers unlimited 4th Floor 630 Vine Street -Cincinnati Ohio 45202 (513)421-5233 engineering financial mafkettna) CLERICAL-KY. Type 35-45. Lots of people contact. SMSO-17,540. Corell, 309 Dixie Term., 721-4950. COLLEGE GRA0S ANY DEGREE Sl0,0O0-$13,000 If you have graduated from college this May, we would like to discuss your first career position, We have many malor corporations with im mediate openings In areas of Man agement, bates, insurance, Manufacturing & Distribution. All corporations offer excellent growth potential & complete coverage of benefits. Consolidated Personnel 800 Central Trust Tower 4? i 1646 CUSTOMER SERVICE Large local firm needs H.) 1 rdwith customer contact expenef (phone contact preferred) Will answer inquiries and give information Excellent benefits. College tmttor refund program plus complete y d Insurance and cost of living. Siart 1720 to $760. TOWER PERSONNEL INC., 2301 Carew Tower, 241-4012 DATA PROCESSING Reluctant to use an agency1 Ask a rriena in me inousTry aooui w a. hiii and Asso. Inc. 2301 Kroger Bldg. Onti.,Ohlo 45202. 241-1255. FRONT COUNTER U50mo. start. Mature. Downtown. Follow-through with customers in printing field. Core, 309 Dixie Term., 721-4950. GENERAL OFFICE $10,400-$1 1,700 This Is an excellent position for someone with good steno skills. You wiH be typing (eners and correspondence, make deposits, pay bills, customer contact by phone, ordering, etc. Looking for a bright individual with a good math aptitude. Benefit package company paid. Merit raises and promotions. For Immediate interview come In or can until 7 00 on Tuesdays. 24l-e675, 432 Walnut St., Suite 208 Tri-State Bldg. EMPLOYMENT AGENCY. LEARN FINANCE 1750 mo. start. Train tor future branch mgmt. Top rated local co. Co-reH,309Drle Term., 11 1-4950 PROGRAMMER ANALYST Our suburban client Is rapidly ex panding and requires programmer Analysts with at least 3 years experience In COBOL and OS'JCL. Salary S18.60u-S27.WO SOURCE CUf, 5I3-69-M80 4015 Executive Park. W02 EMPLOYMENT AGENCY, Fee Paid RESIDENT MGR Ideal for mature couple. Supervise and manage retirement complex Apt. Furnished, all utilities 1650 mo. Mt. Healthy Area. Corell, 309 Dixie Term, 721-4950. RETAIL - PRINTING $650 mo. start. Mature. Downtown. Over counter activity. Corell, 309 Dixie Term., 721-4950 SALES, ADMINISTRATIVE, AND TECHNICAL POSITIONS. MANAGEMENT TRAINEE TO EXECUTIVE LEVEL OPENINGS. BARON 130 E. 6th St. 721-4770 SALESworkt.INC 1 1750 CHESTERDALE RD. BLDG 7 (513 ) 772-4400 SECRETARY TRAIHEE S75OO-S7800 On the job training meeting and greeting clientele, answer phone, fake messages, type and file oeneral correspondence and personnel records, assist In monthly report preparation as you are trained into personnei. Call 721-8338, IBA, 49 E. 4th Street. SECURITY INVESTIGATOR $14,000-516,000 Implementing and evaluating security programs for commercial accounts. supervise j-4 security personnel. Submit daily reports. Call 721-8338. IBA, 49 E. 4th Street. SHILOWE 563-8184 TEACHERS Oh, Ky, Ind. Prlntino or araohlcs, Enolish 9-12. English Volleyball, girls basketball ?-12, guidance counselor, Latin, LD, EMft, ED, BD, Special ED, Principal, general science btologyrench English, 1st Grade, Band Director, Coach, Comprehensive Science, Speech ' Hearing, Asst. Supt., Severe Behavior Disorders, PEHead Football Coach, WuslcVocallnstrumental, Math' Algebra, Vocational Agriculture. CaN or come In today or Sat 10-12, Corell, 309 Dime Term., 721-4950. TELLER TRAINEE H'S grads - Some college preferred or some cashiering experience Excellent benefits, including college iwiHjn reruna program, aiarr 3BU. TOWER PERSONNEL INC., 2301 Carew Tower, 241-6012. TRAIN TO MANAGE 19,000 start. Tram to learn t phases of the financial for future branch mgmt. Corel, 309 Dixie Term., 721-4950. TYPIST Downtown-H'S Grad. Good Typing, Good Benefits. Start S575 to J590. TOWER PERSONNEL NC. 230 Carew Tower, 241-6012 GOrtSUUATiTS Jw SALES (513) 772-5900 IWTrKountyPkwy. 4

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